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Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

Confirmed Speakers

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Doğan Çömez to Speak On The Mathematics of Modern Communication

Doğan Çömez studied mathematics at the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey, and received his PhD degree in mathematics from the University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Following a two year teaching experience in his alma mater, he joined the Department of Mathematics at North Dakota State University in 1985.  His main research interest is in dynamical systems and operator ergodic theory, particularly on the convergence of additive or superadditive processes and ergodic Hilbert transform.  He has also been involved in various interdisciplinary research collaborations in pharmaceutical science, in operations research, and in mathematics and science education.  He has made numerous mathematical presentations for the 4-H Club, the Kiwanis Club, Sonya Kovalevski Math Days and the North Dakota Governor’s School. He is a leading advocate for departmental programs aimed to attract students to Science and Mathematics. He is currently the director of the GraSUS Program (originally NSF-funded, currently institutionalized at NDSU) that places graduate students in local high schools, and the ND-PRIME Project (funded by North Dakota State DPI) that provides professional development for K-12 mathematics teachers.

ABSTRACT: Over the last 100 years our means of communication have been improved and increased, both in variety and quality, in numerous ways; and this change/increase is continuing in a faster pace.  With the advance of computer technology, new and more effective means of communication have been introduced.  Although the general public may not be well aware of it, mathematics is one of the main factors that contributed to this change.  None of the modern means of communication we have today (telephone, telex, fax, e-mail, radio, television, mobile phone, etc.) would be possible without innovative use of mathematical concepts.  Surprisingly, many of the concepts that made all these technological advances possible are those that form a part of typical math curriculum in our universities.  In this talk, I will discuss some of these concepts and how they are utilized in communication technology.  Some of these concepts are part of capstone projects or undergraduate research projects of students at NDSU whom I advised.

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Ryan Zerr to Speak On Being Mathematically Inquisitive: How a Simple Beginning Can Lead to a Wealth of Interesting Questions

Ryan Zerr is a Professor and the Associate Chair in the Mathematics Department at the University of North Dakota.  His background is in operator algebras, but he’s had the pleasure to work with a number of undergraduate students on research projects in dynamical systems.  He is also very interested in undergraduate education generally, devoting considerable time to teaching a wide variety of undergraduate courses in mathematics, as well as directing UND’s First-Year Seminar Program.

ABSTRACT: What is mathematical research, and where does one get started?  There are many answers to this question, but they all likely involve being mathematically inquisitive – wondering about the nature and behavior of mathematical “things.”  This talk will show how a surprisingly simple starting point, along with a bit of curiosity, has led to a variety of mathematical research questions accessible to both high school and undergraduate students.

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Place Photo Takayuki Yamauchi to Speak On “Mathematical Theory of Mechanism of Innovation in Math-Teaching” and “Japan’s Math Teacher Training Programs and their Impact on Japan's Innovation and Economy”

Taka Yamauchi is currently a tenured assistant professor of mathematics at Valley City State University (since 2007). He studied mathematics and physics at Michigan Tech and U.C. Berkeley as an undergraduate, and earned M.A at Western Michigan University, M.S at Michigan Tech, M.A and Ph.D in Mathematics at Johns Hopkins in 1996. He then was a research associate at the Dept. of Chemical Engineering of Johns Hopkins, a research associate at Ryuka Patent Law Firm, a research associate at the Dept. of Computer Engineering of University of Delaware, a visiting assistant professor of mathematics at SUNY Oswego, an assistant professor of mathematics at DePauw University, and an assistant professor of mathematics at Lincoln University. He has publications in the mathematics of nuclear fusion, Lagrange Multiplier Rule in the context of continuous equi-measurable rearrangements of functions and optimization theory, and the constructability of constant mean curvature surfaces in hyperbolic 3-space. He has also been doing research in innovation-based teaching efficiency maximization methods. He has established a self-contained math teaching method that does not require students to read the text at all. Mathematical Theory of Mechanism of Innovation in Math-Teaching

ABSTRACT: According to K.I. West, "Strengthening a Country by Building a Strong Public School Teaching Profession", Journal of Mathematics Education at Teachers College, Spring–Summer 2013, Volume 4, (p. 77) On the other hand, at the K–12 level, a Michigan State University report entitled “Breaking the cycle: An International Comparison of U.S. Mathematics Teacher Preparation” states, “the weak K–12 mathematics curriculum taught by teachers with an inadequate mathematics background produces high school graduates who are similarly weak. Some of them then become future teachers who are not given a strong preparation in mathematics and then they teach and the cycle continues” (p. 31). This report does not explore the root cause or mechanism of why the weak K–12 mathematics curriculum taught by teachers with an inadequate mathematics background produces high school graduates who are similarly weak. In this presentation, the root cause of this fact is explored by characterizing the mechanism of innovation in math-teaching using elementary combinatorial analysis. Japan’s Math Teacher Training Programs and their Impact on Japan's Innovation and Economy

ABSTRACT: Math major requirements at Japan’s public universities are compared with those at America’s public universities. Their influence on Japan’s high school graduations rate, university graduation rate, college job placement rate, innovation index, technology trade balance ratio, net external assets will be presented.

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Place PhotoDavid to Speak On The Simplex Method

ABSTRACT: The Simplex Method, an algorithm used for mathematical optimization, was developed by George Dantzig. This algorithm has an interesting past and is widely used today in industry. This talk will provide a brief history surrounding the discovery (invention) of the method as well as examples of how the Simplex Method is used today.




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Place PhotoMitra to Speak On Modeling spatial data using Geographically Weighted Regression

ABSTRACT: In this study, a relatively new approach, Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) is used for modeling data with spatial nonstationarity. The model performance of Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) and GWR were compared in terms of coefficient of determination (R2) and corrected Akaike Information Criterion (AICc). Moran’s I and Geary’s C were used to test the spatial autocorrelation of OLS and GWR residuals. The study showed that all the GWR models performed better than the analogous OLS models. Test of spatial autocorrelation of residuals revealed that the OLS residuals had higher degrees of spatial autocorrelation than the GWR residuals indicating that GWR mitigates the spatial autocorrelation of residuals. A real world data set (crop residue yield potential data) of 10 North-Central states of the USA was used as an application.

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Place PhotoLaxman to Speak On Longitudinal Analysis of Data on Weight Gain in Rats Exposed to Thiouracil and Thyroxin

ABSTRACT: Longitudinal data consists of the repeated measurements of the same subjects (individuals) over time. In such data, there is a high correlation among the measurements due to the measurement of the same subject repeatedly. We did longitudinal data analysis for the rats’ weight gain data originally available in Applied Longitudinal Analysis by Fitzmaurice et al. (2004).We performed Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA), and fitted linear mixed effects model for the data. The result showed that the treatments had different effects on weight gain of rats.

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Place PhotoNate to Speak On "Philosophy of Mathematics"

Nate Speidel grew up in Hazen, North Dakota. He attended Bismack State College, Saint John's University (MN), and earned his Bachelor's degree in math education from the University of Mary. In 2010, he attended the Klingenstein Summer Institute through Columbia University and completed his master's degree in math teaching through Minot State University. Nate is currently in his 6th year of teaching mathematics at Shiloh Christian High School. He also enjoys chess, travel, playing music, coaching hockey, and longboarding.

ABSTRACT: Many students have been left unsatisfied with the conventional defense of math education. Is mathematics truly worth understanding, and, if so, for whom? In order to justify the time invested and struggle experienced by many, we ought to investigate more than math’s potential application, even more than its academic reward. Why, fundamentally and philosophically, is mathematics important to study? “Philosophy of Mathematics” will address these critical questions, exploring appropriate responses from the mathematics community.

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Place PhotoBreanne to Speak On Parameter Estimation in Avascular Tumor Growth Model

ABSTRACT: This talk outlines a number of mathematical models describing the growth of avascular tumors. The
models assume a continuum of cells in two states, living or dead, and depending on the concentration of generic nutrients the living cells may reproduce or die. A simple inverse problem technique is used to estimate model parameters.


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Carson to Speak On  Light Outs: An Analysis

ABSTRACT: Lights Out is a game played on an n by n grid (traditionally 5 by 5) of "light buttons" wherein each button press inverts the state of the button pressed and the crosswise adjacent buttons.  The object of the game is, given a randomized starting grid, to turn off all the lights.  In this talk we explore the solvability of Lights Out subject to various conditions using basic linear algebra.


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Chloe to Speak On Identification Problem in Parabolic Partial Differential Equation

ABSTRACT: In this work, we consider an inverse problem involving the identification and estimation of distributed parameters in parabolic type initial boundary value problem. Unique solution of the initial boundary value problem  is derived. The time dependent parameter is determined by using observational data.




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David to Speak On Numerical Approximations to the Heat Equation

ABSTRACT: This talk provides a practical overview of numerical solutions to heat equation using the finite difference method. The forward time, central difference, the backward time, central difference, and Crank‐ Nicolson schemes are developed. The results in one dimensional mesh for a model problem are established. Dependency of truncating errors on mesh spacing and time step is shown.


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Place PhotoElliot to Speak On Concave Platonic Solids

ABSTRACT: This presentation will focus on concave Platonic solids. In geometry class last year, we constructed Platonic solid mobiles and were assigned a research topic; mine was about the differences between convex and concave Platonic solids. After doing some research and finding few results, I was intrigued by the concave figures and decided to explore their construction. Several results as well as approaches to finding dimensions of these unique figures will be discussed.



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Place PhotoJohannah to Speak On Schrodinger Equation in Modeling Energy Level of Hydrogen Atom

ABSTRACT: The hydrogen atom is modeled in spherical polar coordinates as an electron orbiting a proton due to an electric coulomb potential. The time independent Schrodinger equation for hydrogen is then solved by using separation of variables method. The radial, azimuthal, and magnetic quantum numbers are calculated. The total wave function describing the quantum states of hydrogen atom is derived.

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Place Photo Justin to Speak On  Finite Difference Method for the Black‐Scholes Option Pricing Model

ABSTRACT: Finance is one of the most rapidly changing and fastest growing areas in the corporate business world. Through these changes, modern financial instruments have become extremely complex. As a result, mathematical models are essential to implement and price these intricate financial instruments. In this particular interdisciplinary approach, we focus on a ground‐breaking result in finance via mathematics called the Black‐ Scholes model. In this work, we implement finite difference methods to solve the Black‐Scholes equation. Stability, error, and numerical examples are also explored.

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Place PhotoMichal to Speak On Numerical solution of Heat Equation by Spectral Method

ABSTRACT: Spectral method is used to solve heat equations numerically, Orthogonal basis are used to establish computational algorithm. Numerical results are presentes. the accuracy and efficiency of proposed model are discussed.



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Nicholas to Speak On A Markov Chain Approach to Baseball Run Forecasting

ABSTRACT: We apply the Stochastic Process of Markov Chains to the game of baseball to calculate a team's expected run scoring potential and analyze significant forecasters of a team's offensive output.





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Thomas to Speak On Introduction to Simulated Annealing

ABSTRACT: Simulated annealing is a search method used for finding a close approximation of the global optimum solution within a solution space. This presentation is intended to provide an introductory overview of simulated annealing, accompanied by some examples.





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