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Education Specialist in School Psychology

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Graduate Student Handbook

Introduction

Welcome to the School Psychology Program at Minot State University (MSU). This Handbook is designed to provide you with important information you will need while a student in the program. It describes the policies and procedures to which you will be expected to adhere. You are also strongly encouraged to consult with your advisor on a regular basis to ensure optimal progression toward your degree completion.

The School Psychology Program is housed in the Department of Addiction Studies, Psychology and Social Work within the College of Education and Health Sciences at MSU. Education related programs are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). The School Psychology Program is, in turn, conditionally accredited by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) at the Education Specialist (Ed.S) level.

Mission of Minot State University

The Minot State University Mission is to provide graduate and undergraduate programs in the liberal arts and sciences and in professional education; to promote excellence in teaching and learning; to support research, scholarly and creative activities; and to provide service to the State of North Dakota.

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Mission of the College of Education and Health Sciences

“The College of Education and Health Sciences prepares quality professionals and pre-professionals in education, human service, and health science to meet the needs of others within a changing society. “

In keeping with the mission of the MSU College of Education and Health Sciences is to prepare professional educators by developing their reflective decision-making and leadership skills through a systematic integration of theory and research in collaboration with professional practices and experiences. The mission is continually being refined and up-dated in order to be current, and to educate professionals who will be responsive to the needs of all learners. The College of Education and Health Sciences reaffirms its primary focus of excellence in teaching, research, and service.

In line with the mission of the College of Education and Health Sciences, the mission of the School Psychology Program is to prepare professional leaders who possess competencies in knowledge, skills, and dispositions to meet the educational and mental health needs of children of diverse backgrounds.

Vision of the College of Education and Health Sciences

The College of Education and Health Sciences has a regional, national and international reputation as a college:

Program Philosophy

The theme of Preparing Leaders who are Reflective Decision Makers is a guide to the mission of the School Psychology Program at Minot State University. This theme prepares students to become competent leaders in the field of school psychology with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to make effective professional decisions via reflective decision-making.

The conceptual framework that supports the theme of "Reflective Decision Making + Leadership" includes the following thematic strands:

Underlying the conceptual framework is the belief that preparation for all professional educators must be aligned with state content, national and professional standards. This includes the following: a strong emphasis on the development of the student's knowledge, skills, and dispositions, inclusion of all learning environments, relevance to diversity and technology integration, and the development and enhancement of partnerships.

Decision-making is viewed as an on-going interactive process in which a myriad of factors must be understood and balanced in making sound professional decisions. Using the scientist- practitioner approach, students are trained to consider input from a variety of sources, synthesize the information after reflection, and make data based decisions, which result in positive changes for children and their learning environments. Also inherent in the theme are teamwork efforts and promoting collaboration with other individuals; this prepares students to become professional leaders who are “Reflective Decision-Makers” following the three major aspects of the Action Reflection Knowledge (ARK) model.

Program Goals and Objectives

The goals of the School Psychology Program at Minot State University are to prepare competent school psychologists who possess the knowledge base, necessary clinical skills and dispositions to serve the educational and mental health needs of children of diverse backgrounds and to function as leaders within the educational context who promote problem solving through team work and collaboration.

Graduates of the school psychology program are prepared to provide direct and indirect school psychological services for children, parents, teachers, related personnel, administrators, and community agencies.  Continuing professional development is also offered annually to area professionals in education and mental health fields (e.g. School Psychology Symposium).

Anchored in the mission, philosophy, and goals stated above, the program subscribes to the following objective for students enrolled in the Minot State University School Psychology Program:

      promotes their understanding of educational settings as systems.

      as current professional standards and issues.

      based service delivery.

      social, behavioral, affective, and adaptive skills of children.

       processes pertinent to serving the educational and mental health needs of children,

using various models and techniques.

      remediation and intervention, including instructional and behavioral interventions,

      counseling, and consultation.

       positively engage in teamwork efforts.

      community and to promote partnerships in providing comprehensive service to

       children and their families.

      acquire skills to work with children from diverse backgrounds.

      dispositions.

       students to integrate theoretical knowledge, empirical research, and professional

      experience in practice.

       relevant to school psychology.

      professional organizations, participation in state and national conventions, and

      attendance at workshops and seminars.

Degree Offered

Ed.S  School Psychology

A minimum of 67 (non-thesis option) or 70 (thesis option) semester hours beyond the baccalaureate degree with emphasis on the professional practice model.

Minimum Requirements for Admission

Ed.S   An earned Bachelor's degree with a GPA of 3.0 or above or an earned Master's degree with a GPA of 3.0 or above from an accredited institution, GRE aptitude scores with a minimum total of 900 across the two areas of Verbal and Quantitative, three letters of recommendation, and a personal statement of professional goals.   These requirements will be evaluated in committee and will be recorded using the Admission Evaluation Form Appendix G.

Minot State University and the School Psychology Program in particular value human diversity. Therefore, applicants with diverse backgrounds are strongly encouraged to apply.

Requirements for Residency

For degree of Education Specialist, a full-time continuous residency is required for all students. This means students must carry a minimum of 9 graduate credit hours per semester in fall and winter, and 6 graduate credit hours during one summer semester in order to maintain full-time student status with the exception of their internship year.

School Psychology Symposium and Continuing Professional Development

The program offers a continuing professional development opportunity for practicing school psychologists and other professionals in education and mental health fields. This opportunity is the school psychology symposium, which is offered annually, at which various current professional issues are presented and discussed. All students in the program are required to attend these symposiums. The tentative schedule for the symposium is as follows:

8:00 – 8:30      Registration

8:30 – 12:30    Presentation

12:00 – 1:00    Lunch on your own

1:00 – 4:00      Meeting with current interns

Student Program Progression Criteria

Each year, student progress in the program and professional dispositions are carefully monitored and evaluated by the program faculty, using the Student Progress Evaluation Form for Ed.S (Appendix A) and Professional Dispositions Assessment  (Appendix B). The criteria for student retention and progression in the program are as follows:

Procedures for Remediation

For those students who do not meet the criteria for progression and retention, the following procedures will be implemented with all steps documented in writing and communicated to the students during an annual conference with their advisor and/or other appropriate program faculty.

following options: Determine that remediation has been successful and the student is allowed to continue in the program;  Continue remediation with an updated remedial plan and a new date set for re- evaluation; Or dismissal from the program. The student may appeal the decision and make a request for exception with the School Psychology Committee.

Requirements for Graduation

Transfer of Intellectual Assessment Credits

Students who have a Master's in school psychology or related areas from other universities and who intend to transfer their previous course work in assessment of intelligence must submit a tape of an administration of the WISC-IV, its protocol, and a written psychological report of the test results. The tape, protocol, and report will be reviewed by the School Psychology Committee with respect to the skill competency of the student to determine if the requirement of Psy Cognitive Assessment can be waived. If deemed necessary, the committee may request that the student take Psy 514 Cognitive Assessment to remedy his or her deficiencies in basic testing and interpretive skills.

Transfer of Internship Credits

Students who have a Master's school psychology from other universities and who have completed a year internship as part of their degree requirements shall be allowed to transfer no more than a total of 750 clock hours, of the 1200 hours required, toward their internship hours at the Ed.S level.

Transfer of Credits from Master's and Specialist Work from Other Universities

Students who desire to transfer their graduate credits from other universities toward their Specialist degree in School Psychology at MSU must submit to their program advisor a course syllabus and/or an official course description of each course that they intend to request for transfer to verify the equivalence of the course content. The grade for each course must be at least a B (3.0) and earned within the last seven years. The evidence of course equivalence will be forwarded to the School Psychology Committee for final decisions.  The maximum number of credits for transfer is 12.

Program of Study

The program requirements are developed in terms of core and supporting areas of study. They reflect NASP Standards for Training and Field Placement Programs in School Psychology (NASP, 2000) and are consistent with the program's goals/objectives (Appendix H).

The alignment of course work with the NASP Domains of School Psychology Training and Practice is demonstrated in the School Psychology Ed.S Content Matrix (Appendix I).

Typical Schedule for Ed.S Program

After admission to the program, the student must file an approved Program of Study in the Graduate School Office prior to the end of his/her first semester.  A copy of the Program of Study must also be filed with the Director of the School Psychology Program.  The student should keep a copy for his/her records.

If a student wants particular courses waived, the requested modifications must be submitted in writing to the Director of the School Psychology Program.  The petition should include supporting documents (transcripts, course syllabi, and rationale).  The Program Director brings that petition to the consideration of the Dean of the Graduate School.  If course work is being transferred in from another institution, it must be current (taken within the last seven years).  If the course work is not current, the Minot State University School Psychology faculty member who teaches in that subject area must certify to the Graduate School that the applying student’s skills are appropriate to current best practice.   

This Program of Study is used by the University to check that all requirements have been fulfilled by the student in order to receive his/her degree.  The maximum time limit for completion of a graduate program is seven years.  This is calculated from the date the student first enrolls in course work for graduate credit which is required for the degree.  Should any of the course work (resident or transfer) exceed the time limit, the classes would have to be repeated.

Student Program of Study - Regular Sequence

First Year - Fall

            PSY   503  Statistics........................................................................... 3

            PSY   511  Human Growth and Development............................... 3

            PSY   518  Child Psychopathology .................................................. 3

            PSY   525  Role and Function of the School Psychologist .............. 3

            Total  ................................................................................................. 12 semester hours

Spring

            PSY    512  Research Design and Measurement ............................. 3

            PSY    513   Research Seminar..................................................................2

            PSY    514  Individual Cognitive Assessment ................................ 4

            PSY    533  Social and Behavioral Interventions in School............. 3

            Total................................................................................................... 12 semester hours

Summer

            PSY   592 Special Topics:  Diversity in the Schools......................... 3

            ED     540/541  Reading:  Advanced Diagnosis and Remediation 3

            PSY   590  Counseling Skills............................................................. 3

            Total................................................................................................... 9 semester hours

Second Year - Fall

            PSY    592 Graduate Seminar Special Topics in School Psychology....................... 3

            PSY    584  School Psychology Practicum I..................................... 3

            SPED  542 Methods and Materials of

                                        Teaching the Developmentally Disabled............. 3

            SPED  550 Special Education Assessment....................................... 2

           

            SPED  533 Clinic Practice................................................................. 1

            Total................................................................................................... 12 semester hours

Spring

            SPED 561 Behavior Problems of Exceptional Children.................. 3

            PSY    585  School Psychology Practicum II.................................... 3

            SPED  572  Methods of Teaching the Learning Disabled............... 3

            PSY 586 Clinical Experience............................................................ 3

            Total................................................................................................... 12 semester hours

Third Year - Fall

            PSY 598  Internship.......................................................................... 6 semester hours

Spring

            PSY 599  Internship.......................................................................... 6 semester hours  

            PSY 597 Thesis Credits..................................................................... Variable

                                     Can be taken any time during the second or third year.

Course Description

ED 540   Reading:  Advanced Diagnosis and Remediation (2 SH)

Students learn to evaluate and remediate children's reading problems within a Response-to-Intervention framework..  This course includes a practicum experience (ED 541) in which students must administer a formal and informal reading test to a child and formulate recommendations for instruction based on the results.

ED 541   Clinical Practice in Remedial Reading (2 SH)

This course focuses on applying concepts from Ed 540 to actual clinic work with a student experiencing difficulties with reading.  It is complementary to ED 540.


PSY 503   Statistics (3 SH)

This course provides instruction in the tools necessary for understanding contemporary educational research, including probability, measures of central tendency, sampling theory, and simple parametric and nonparametric methods of analysis.

PSY 511   Human Growth and Development (3 SH)

Theory and research in the areas of sensorimotor, language, cognitive, emotional, social, and moral behavior of the normal child.  The interaction of the biological and environmental factors influencing growth and development are stressed. 

PSY 512   Research Design and Measurement (3 SH)

A variety of research methodologies, as pertains to school psychology, will be examined, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of their use.  Nature and type of measurement in school psychology are also examined.  Social controversies about measurement and the construction of measuring devices will be discussed.

PSY 513   School Psychology Research Seminar (2 SH)

This course is a practicum in research design and implementation.  Students will design a research projects relevant to issues in school psychology.  Students on the thesis track will select and meet with an advisor regarding the preparation of the project, and have their research proposals approved by the graduate committees and the Institutional Research Board.  Students who are not on the thesis track will develop a research proposal to present to the class and the instructor for evaluation and feedback.

PSY 514   Individual Cognitive Assessment (4 SH)

Concerned with theory and methodology as well as procedures and techniques of administering a wide range of group and individually administered tests of intelligence.  Some of the tests the students will learn are the SB-V, WISC-IV, WAIS III, etc.  The students will be required to complete 20 test administrations and protocols and ten written reports, one of which will be a cap-stone report where some child has been administered at least three tests.


PSY 518   Child Psychopathology (3 SH)

Behavior problems are considered from the point of view of genetic abnormalities, teratogens, deviations in normal development, effects of social and family stressors, and failure to develop appropriate social skills.  The major theories and research related to the development of deviant behavior in children are examined within this framework.

PSY 519   Human Relations and Diversity (3SH)

This course explores the nature of the interrelationships between culture, gender, and ethnic background in a diverse nation.  It is intended to meet North Dakota standards for certification as a School Psychologist.

PSY 525   Role and Function of the School Psychologist (3 SH)

This course is survey of historical and current topics, related issues, and professional problems relative to the practice of school psychology.  Emphasis is given to the roles and functions of the school psychologist, to professional standards, and to legal and ethical considerations.

PSY 533   Social and Behavioral Interventions in School (3 SH)

Using the Response-to-Intervention framework, measurement of social, emotional, and behavioral issues, and the application of research-based interventions to the social and behavioral problems of children and adolescents in the school setting will be discussed.  Mental health issues in the schools are also considered.

PSY 584   School Psychology Practicum I (3 SH)

The practicum provides an opportunity for students to apply their learning from content courses to elementary and secondary students who are at the Universal, Strategic, and Intensive levels of service in the Response-to-Intervention framework.  Practicum I gives school psychology students hand-on experience with students, faculty, and parents in the school setting.

PSY 585   School Psychology Practicum II (3 SH)

This is a cap-stone course wherein the students apply information learned and skills acquired in previous courses in evaluation and intervention planning to actual school-based cases.  It is a continuation of Practicum I, in which theory and techniques are applied to assisting school children at the Universal, Strategic, and Intensive levels of service.  Emphasis will be placed on deciding whether an intervention or consultative role will best meet a particular child's needs.

PSY 586   Clinical Experience (3 SH)

This course provides the didactic experience in counseling which accompanies participation in the Minot State University School Psychology Clinic.

PSY 590   Counseling Skills (3 SH)

This course will equip the students with the counseling micro skills of active listening, and will help the students explore various counseling modalities within a Response-to-Intervention framework.  The students will understand the background and rationale of these skills and modalities.  Moreover, they will develop beginning level skills through practice with supervised feedback.  Opportunities to observe these skills being applied and supervised implementation in the public school will be provided during the second year.

PSY 592   Special Topics in School Psychology (3 SH)

This course provides a seminar format for instruction and discussion of current topics of interest in School Psychology.  These will include consultation and collaboration, early childhood evaluation and intervention, specific behavioral techniques (Functional Behavioral Assessments, writing Positive Behavior Supports), and informal evaluation and intervention using the Response-to-Intervention service-delivery model.

PSY 598   Internship (6 SH)

The internship will involve spending 600 hours in schools or appropriate community setting.  The internship will involve an integrative experience where the individual will demonstrate competencies in assessment, programming, consultation and counseling.

PSY 599   Internship (6 SH)

The internship will involve spending 600 hours in schools or appropriate community setting.  The internship will involve an integrative experience where the individual will demonstrate competencies in assessment, programming, consultation and counseling.


SPED 542   Methods and Materials of Teaching the Developmentally Disabled (3 SH)

A methods course in instruction of young children and older learners with severe or multiple handicaps, birth through 21 years.  The course emphasizes current best educational practices and research-based programs in curriculum development, delivery and monitoring, including individualized program planning and adaptations, specific instructional strategies, and organizing for the delivery of instruction.

SPED 550   Special Education Assessment (2 SH)

An introduction to evaluation techniques that are commonly used to assess and intervene with student learning difficulties as they move from the Universal level of the Response-to-Intervention framework to the Strategic and Intensive levels.  Particular emphasis is placed here on continuous progress monitoring in order to document positive responses to interventions.

SPED 533   Clinic Practice (1 SH)

This course, taken in conjunction with SPED 550, provides practicum experience in the administration of commonly used education evaluation and assessment techniques.

SPED 561   Behavior Problems of Exceptional Children (3 SH)

Principles and techniques of behavior management are related to classroom structure, development of academic and social skills within a Response-to-Intervention framework.

SPED 572   Methods of Teaching the Learning Disabled (3 SH)

This course focuses on the application of instructional methods for students with – or at risk for – high incidence disabilities.  Students enrolled in the course will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the theoretical framework underlying instructional practices that have been shown effective for students with mild disabilities, to select and implement appropriate modifications that support learners with special needs in content-area classes, develop appropriate lessons based on assessment information and models of effective instruction, and correctly apply instructional techniques and curricular materials associated with positive outcomes for students with learning disabilities.

Practicum

The School Psychology Program embeds practicum experiences throughout the student's course work. Also required is a two-course Practicum series during the second year of residency (Psy 584/585, Practicum I and Practicum II). These practicum experiences are designed to allow the student to apply information and skills acquired in their classes to real life. 

Student experiences such as job shadowing, attending school board meetings, attending local and regional conferences, and participating in the Minot State University School Psychology Clinic are all considered practicum experiences, in that they represent the kinds of activities undertaken by practicing school psychologists.  However, the bulk of the Minot State practicum experience and instruction takes place during Practicum I and II.  These 3-credit courses combine direct classroom instruction with placement in a regional school under the field supervision of a practicing school psychologist.  Along with work assigned in class, the student is expected to be available to the field supervisor a minimum of one school day a week across the length of the school year.

In order to assess student practicum performance, each field supervisor for Practicum’s I and II is invited to fill out the Minot State University Practicum Student Evaluation form (see Appendix C) once per semester.  Also, practicum students’ university supervisors exchange information once a month with field supervisors to maintain personal contact.  Finally, each student keeps a running log, throughout the program, of their practicum-quality experiences.  The running log will include the date of the practicum, what class it was associated with, what the student experienced, and the student's reflections.  Reflection of practicum experiences include the students personal feelings of the impact the practicum had on themselves, any learning experiences that can be related to the program, and any implications the practicum experience may have on future life expectations of the student.  The practicum log is used in both Practicum I and II, as well as other courses when appropriate practicum experiences are assigned.  Specifically, the log is to be submitted during the last week of class to instructors who have assigned activities which they deem to be practicum-quality.  These classes may include, but are not limited to, Child Psychopathology, Individual Cognitive Assessment, Reading, School Psych Practicum I, and School Psych Practicum II.   It is the instructor’s discretion whether the log will be included in the course grade.

During Psychology 584/585 (Practicum I/II) each student will also be required to submit a Weekly Contact Log (Appendix D) to the course instructor. This log is a brief accountability of practicum experiences and other activities related to these experiences. Weekly contact logs should be submitted each Friday. Excessive delinquency in submitting this form in a timely manner will be reflected in one’s student evaluation.

Performance-Based Program Assessment

In accordance with the NASP Standards for Training and Field Placement Programs in School Psychology (NASP, 2000), the school psychology program at MSU employs a comprehensive, performance-based assessment system to evaluate program quality via the assessment of candidate competencies throughout the program of study. The purpose of the comprehensive and systematic assessment of candidate performance is twofold: 1) to ensure that candidates at the completion of their training demonstrate professional competencies which reflect the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that a new professional should possess; and 2) to use the resulting information to monitor candidate progression as well as to evaluate and improve program quality. At each point of assessment, data are aggregated to monitor program quality and to determine strengths and weaknesses of the program. The school psychology faculty members meet on a regular basis, including the scheduled fall, spring, and year-end retreat meetings, to discuss the assessment results and, if appropriate, consider possible changes to any aspect of the program. As stated earlier, the goals of the School

Psychology Program at MSU are to prepare competent school psychologists who possess the knowledge, skills and dispositions to serve the educational and mental health needs of children of diverse backgrounds and to function as leaders within the educational context. These goals are achieved via continuous performance- based assessment of both individual candidates and program outcomes.

The following details the sequence of performance assessment, various methods for assessing and documenting outcomes, and the data used to monitor and improve program quality.

Program Assessment

First Year

During the fall semester of the first year, students must take the preliminary exam, typically given in November. The exam consists of 4 essay questions that are designed to tap into the students' broad knowledge base pertinent to school psychology and their ability to write in a coherent, organized manner.

The Professional Dispositions Assessment (PDA, Appendix B) is given to at least two of the course instructors at or near the end of the first semester to evaluate the students' professional dispositions.

During the spring semester of the first year, preliminary interviews take place in the last week of January or the first week of February. The purpose of these individualized interviews is to provide students with feedback on their progression in the program based on their preliminary exam results, instructors' ratings on the PDA, and their first semester GPA's. A copy of the Student Progress Evaluation Form (Appendix A) is provided, along with written notification of the preliminary exam results. If warranted, specific recommendations for improvement are given, followed by a copy of the remediation plan being sent to the student and his/her advisor.

Second Year

During the second year, students' performance is evaluated via field placement for their practicum. Students are placed in school settings in and around Minot. Toward the end of the fall practicum, site supervisors complete the School Psychology Practicum Student Evaluation Form (Appendix C) and the Professional Dispositions Assessment (PDA). The students continue to acquire field experiences at the same sites during the spring semester. Near the end of the spring practicum, students' performance is again evaluated by the site supervisors, using the School Psychology Practicum Student Evaluation Form and the PDA. The class meets on a weekly basis and the course instructor provides on-going feedback.

Supervisor ratings on the School Psychology Practicum Student Evaluation Form for the spring semester are aggregated across students, specific to the NASP domains of training, to evaluate and improve the components of the program at the year-end faculty meeting. PDA ratings are also aggregated for faculty review. Upon completion of practicum, students are provided with a copy of the Student Progress Evaluation Form and, if warranted, specific recommendations for improvement are given, followed by copy of remediation plan being sent to the student and his/her advisor.

In addition, during the spring semester of the second year, students are required to take the comprehensive exam, typically offered in April (see Graduate Student Handbook for specific dates). The first day of the exam covers all of the supporting area course work and the second day all of the core area course work. Whereas the first day exam consists of 5-6 essay questions, the second day exam is comprised of 4-5 case vignettes pertinent to, for example, ethics, consultation, intervention, and assessment. A written notification of the results is sent to students. Students who fail the exam or pass it with conditions will be notified of a meeting date and time with the School Psychology Committee to discuss the results and develop a remediation plan.   

Third Year

During the third year, internship takes place over a period of the entire academic year. The Internship Evaluation Form-Site Supervisor's (see Internship Guidelines) is completed by the site supervisor on two separate occasions. The first evaluation occurs approximately halfway through the internship, preferably during the last week of the first semester. The final evaluation occurs at or near the end of the internship.

 Students are also required to develop an electronic portfolio of internship experiences to document a full range of professional competencies. The guidelines for developing a professional product portfolio are included in the Internship Guidelines (pg. 19, Internship Guidelines). The Electronic Professional Product Portfolio (EPPP) is to be turned in near the end of the internship and is rated by the university supervisor(s).

Student ratings on the Internship Evaluation Form as well as ratings on EPPP are aggregated specific to the NASP domains of training to evaluate and improve the components of the program at the year-end program meeting.

Internship feedback is provided via two mediums of communication: site conferences/ visits (students who are interning more than 250 miles from Minot will receive University supervision by phone and internet) and the on-campus School Psychology Symposium. A site conference/visit takes place approximately midway through the internship unless the site supervisor indicates a need for an earlier discussion. A final conference/visit will occur near the end of the internship. All interns are required to return to campus on the first Friday of February to attend a morning symposium. Student/faculty meetings are scheduled in the afternoon following the symposium. During these meetings, feedback is provided in groups and/or on an individual basis.

All students must take the Praxis II exam and obtain a passing score (660) for graduation. Students are strongly encouraged to take the exam during the first semester of internship or the summer prior to the internship to avoid unnecessary delay in graduation. That is, if the student fails to obtain a passing score, he/she must retake the exam, which will usually take a period of several months for re-registration for the exam. For program evaluation and improvement, the Praxis II exam results are aggregated across students specific to the areas assessed and are reviewed at a spring or year-end program meeting.

Post Program Assessment

Approximately one year following graduation, the Graduate Survey (Appendix E) and the Employer Evaluation forms (Appendix F) are mailed to all graduates and their employers to solicit their feedback on the program's training quality. It is, therefore, important to keep your mailing addresses up to date with the graduate office. Ratings on the Graduate and Employer Survey forms are aggregated specific to the NASP domains of training to inform program quality and be used for program improvement.

For those students with a master's degree in School Psychology from an accredited program, the course sequence typically starts at the 3rd year level. However, the students must take the preliminary exam during the first semester of study at MSU. The comprehensive exam is taken prior to completion of internship.

Professional Intervention and Due Process for Impaired School Psychology Students

Most students who enter a graduate program believe they are embarking on their chosen profession. Some discover that this is not what they desire, or that they lack the talent to perform effectively in their chosen field, and drop out of their program. Because school psychologists continuously intervene in the lives of others, it is very important that only competent beginning- level clinicians be allowed to graduate. It is, therefore, the ethical responsibility of the school psychology faculty to identify, alert, and advise those students who are severely lacking in academic, personal, and clinical skills.

Dismissing an impaired student from the school psychology program is a very difficult situation for both faculty and students. Because of the seriousness of this action, the following document contains the definition and categories of impairment, subsequent procedures for professional intervention, and due process.

Impairment

For purposes of this document impairment is broadly defined as an interference in professional functioning, which is reflected in one or more of the following ways:

Due Process Procedures

Due process ensures that decisions made by educational programs are not arbitrary. The following due process procedures apply to all students and incorporate appropriate appeal procedures available to the student so she or he may challenge the program's action. The procedure used to address an impaired student and/or advise the student regarding their career choice is:

Academic Honesty

The integrity of the University community is contingent upon fulfillment of a trust-that the members of the student body will engage in reasonable behaviors to promote and protect the educational environment. The Minot State University School Psychology handbook defines academic dishonesty in this way:

At the discretion of the instructor, a student caught engaging in any form of academic dishonesty may be:

Furthermore, violation of the University Academic Honesty Policy could result in the University taking disciplinary action, including expulsion from school (see MSU Student Handbook).

Americans with Disabilities Act Policy

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), any MSU student with a disability is eligible for services.  Written documentation of the disability, usually in the form of a diagnostic report, should be provided by the student to the Disability Services (DS) coordinator prior to receiving any accommodations.  Also, students who suspect they have a disability should meet with the DS coordinator to discuss his/her concerns.  If appropriate, a referral for formal evaluation will be made.  Referrals are made to professionals or agencies in the community who do diagnostic work in the specific area of disability.  For more information on DS, please call 701-858-3371 or go to www.minotstateu.edu/disability_services.

School Psychology Faculty

Core Facility

Casey Coleman, EdD in School Psychology, University of South Dakota. Director of the Minot State University School Psychology Program, with nine years experience in school practice. Research interests include behavior management and anxiety/test performance.

Darren E. Dobrinski, PhD in School Psychology, University of South Dakota.  Director, Minot State University School Psychology Clinic.  Research interests include Autism Spectrum Disorders, particularly Asperger’s Syndrome.

Supporting Facility

Rita Curl-Langager, PhD, University of Kansas.  Developmental Psychology.  Research interests include both child and geriatric human development.

 Shirley Cole-Harding, PhD, University of Colorado.  Statistics and Statistical Methods.  Research interests include the effects of caffeine and alcohol on human behavior and performance.

Paul Markel, PhD.  Research Methods, University of Colorado.  Research interests include behavioral genetics and haptic memory.

Deb Olson, PhD, University of Massachusetts. Research Methods and Thesis Development.  Research interests include ethology and haptic memory.


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Student Progress

Evaluation Form

(Appendix A)

Student’s Name_________________________________ Program Advisor______________

Year Entered the Program _______________________

Year 1

To be completed January - February of Year 1

Date of Preliminary Interview ____________________

To be completed May - June of Year 1

Date of Review  ____________________

          (If unsatisfactory, attach copy of Remediation Plan)

        Comments ________________________________________________________________

      __________________________________________________________________________

Student Signature ________________________________           Date___________________

Advisor Signature ________________________________           Date___________________

Year 2

To be completed May - June of Year 2

Date of Review  ____________________

Assessment Ratings:                              Fall __________        Spring __________

          (If unsatisfactory, attach copy of Remediation Plan)

        Comments ________________________________________________________________

      __________________________________________________________________________

Student Signature ________________________________           Date___________________

Advisor Signature ________________________________           Date___________________

Year 3

To be completed May - June of Year 3

Date of Exit Interview  ____________________

        Comments ________________________________________________________________

      __________________________________________________________________________

Approval for Graduation (circle one):               Yes                  No

Student Signature ________________________________           Date___________________

Advisor Signature ________________________________           Date___________________


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Professional Dispositions

Assessment

(Appendix B)


Student’s Name________________________________  Class_______  Semester_____  20__

CRITERIA*

N

1

2

3

Human Diversity

  • Demonstrates awareness of own values and beliefs.

  • Respects all persons and is sensitive to the value systems of diverse groups. *

  • Understands group and within-group differences.

  • Relates appropriately and professionally with persons of diverse backgrounds

  • Demonstrates ability to recognize the limits of own multicultural competency.

*   e.g., physical , mental, emotional, economic, social, cultural, ethnic, & racial characteristics: gender, sexual orientation; and religion

Comments:

Communication Skills

  • Is aware of own communication style and its impact on others.

  • Demonstrates active listening skills.

  • Demonstrates effective and reflective communication skills.

  • Has ability to communicate effectively in writing.

  • Articulates with clarity and fluency.

Comments:

Interpersonal Relationships

  • Demonstrates respect for the feelings, opinions, knowledge, and abilities of others

  • Is genuine and authentic in relationships

  • Displays the ability to handle conflicts in a constructive manner.

  • Accepts suggestions and/or constructive criticisms from others and is willing to make necessary changes.

  • Collaborates and cooperates effectively in group or team settings.

Comments:

Personal /Professional Responsibility

  • Demonstrates awareness of own values and beliefs.

  • Respects all persons and is sensitive to the value systems of diverse groups. *

  • Understands group and within-group differences.

  • Relates appropriately and professionally with persons of diverse backgrounds

  • Demonstrates ability to recognize the limits of own multicultural competency.

Comments:

Personal Growth & Adaptability

  • Displays appropriate affect and emotions.

  • Recognizes own strengths and weaknesses.

  • Reflects upon and takes responsibility for own behavior

  • Solicits and considers alternative view points

  • Demonstrates consistent enthusiasm for position/profession

Comments:

Rating Scale:                        N         No opportunity to observe

                                     1         Unacceptable

                                     2         Acceptable

                                     3         Target

Scoring Rubric

UNACCEPTABLE

ACCEPTABLE

TARGET

Student is not familiar with the professional dispositions delineated above.  S/he does not model these dispositions in class and outside class as well as in his/her work with clients, families, and other professionals.

Student is familiar with the dispositions expected of professionals.  His/her conduct in and outside class as well as in professional capacity generally reflects the dispositions delineated above.

Student’s conduct consistently demonstrates the dispositions delineated in all settings.  S/he recognizes when his/her own dispositions may need to be adjusted and are able to develop plans to do so.

OVERALL RATING OF STUDENT’S DISPOSITIONS (circle one):

Below 2                             2                              Above 2

If the overall rating is “Below2”, list the specific characteristics that must be addressed by the student:

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

* used with permission from the University of South Dakota


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Practicum Student

Evaluation

(Appendix C)


Supervisor’s Name ___________________________________  Position ________________

Certification Number ______________________  State Where Certified _______________

Practicum Placement __________________________________________________________

Practicum Student Evaluated: __________________________________ Date ___________

Please write the number in the far right column to show the level of competence of the student for each item.  Your ratings should be based on the level of competence you would expect of a student prior to beginning his or her internship.  If the student was not expected to complete a task, then write N/A in the column for the item.

                                               

1  =  Below Average      2  =  Average      3 = Above Average      N/A  =  Not Applicable

DEMONSTRATION OF KNOWLEDGE AND/OR SKILL

SCORE

  • Identifies the nature of the referral problem and plans assessment accordingly.

  • Selects appropriate assessment methods tailored to referral concerns & language/cultural factors.

  • Knows the strengths and limitations of various assessment instructions and techniques.

  • Reviews school records to gather pertinent information.

5.  Conducts adequate behavioral observations of referred persons & of their instructional environments

  • Interviews parents, teachers, students, and others to identify needs and strengths of individuals referred.

  • Conducts norm-referenced psycho educational tests according to standardization.

  • Scores various protocols in an accurate manner and, when appropriate, using computer scoring programs.

  • Accurately interprets the results of various assessment measures.

  • Integrates test and non-test data from multiple sources in a coherent and meaningful manner.

  • Translates assessment results into empirically based decisions about service delivery

  • Uses data to select research-based interventions to meet the individual’s needs.

  • Uses data to determine the effectives of interventions.

  • Writes reports that are thorough, concise, and understandable by parents and related professionals

  • Effectively communicates assessment results and recommendations orally.

  • Develops appropriate cognitive and academic goals for individuals with different ability, disabilities, strengths, and needs.

  • Formulates academic interventions that are empirically validated.

  • Uses curriculum-based measurement when appropriate.

  • Develops appropriate behavioral, affective, and social goals for individuals with different ability, disabilities, strengths, and needs.

  • Understands and accurately applies principles of behavioral change in the schools.

  • Conducts functional analysis of behavior.

  • Formulates behavioral interventions that are empirically validated.

  • Demonstrates skills to provide counseling.

  • Applies a systematic problem-solving process to consultation.

  • Collaborates effectively with teachers, administrators, parents, and other professionals in various situations and settings.

  • Participates and contributes during team meetings aimed at meeting students’ needs.

  • Displays sensitivity to bias when selecting, administering, and interpreting assessment techniques.

  • Demonstrates sensitivity and understanding of individual differences, abilities, and disabilities and how diversity might affect an individual’s education.

  • Understands educational agency policies and organizational structure and procedures.

  • Understands procedures for referrals, assessing student records, contacting parents, etc.

  • Demonstrates understanding of schools and other settings as systems.

  • Recognizes the symptoms and/or precursors of emotional, behavioral difficulties of students.

  • Demonstrates knowledge of various preventive strategies to promote the mental health of students.

  • Demonstrates knowledge of crisis intervention and applies it when needed.

  • Promotes prevention programs and participates in their development.

  • Promotes partnerships between families and schools.

  • Collaborates with others in the development of educational and support programs that assist parents.

  • Is familiar with and appropriately utilizes community resources.

  • Understands and adheres to state and federal rules and regulations.

  • Adheres to ethics and practices consistent with the National Association of School Psychologists.

  • Participates in professional development activities.

  • Uses technology to enhance effectiveness and quality of work.

  • Demonstrates the ability to access and utilize information technology.

Additional Comments _________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________

Signature of Site Supervisor



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Weekly Contact Log

(Appendix D)


NAME:____________________________                                                            Week of _________ to _________

DATE

Case # / Class

Purpose

TIME

Supervision

Observation

Session

Prep

Other

DATE

Case # / Class

Purpose

TIME

Supervision

Observation

Session

Prep

Other

DATE

Case # / Class

Purpose

TIME

Supervision

Observation

Session

Prep

Other

DATE

Case # / Class

Purpose

TIME

Supervision

Observation

Session

Prep

Other

DATE

Case # / Class

Purpose

TIME

Supervision

Observation

Session

Prep

Other

(Minutes)     Previous Total __________ Total this Week ______________ Cumulative Total ___________



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Survey of Graduates

(Appendix E)


Name and title (person completing form): ________________________________________

Organization/agency: _________________________________________________________

Overall, rate your preparation as an MSU school psychology program graduate preparing for employment within an organization/agency (circle one):

Exceptional         More than           Adequate            Less than             Unprepared

                                                Adequate                                            Adequate

Comment: ___________________________________________________________________

Please complete the following survey examining how successful you feel the school psychology program was in preparing you to enter your profession by rating the quality of training you received on each of the following areas of competence or skill:

Areas of Competence or Skill

Above

Average

Average

Below Average

Comment, particularly if below average

1. Data-Based Decision-Making and Accountability.  Understands and use various methods of assessment and use collected data to make decisions regarding individual and program needs.

2. Consultation and Collaboration.  Have knowledge of consultative and collaborative models and methods and demonstrate effective skills in regards to academic and behavioral concerns.

3.  Effective Instruction and Development of Cognitive/Academic Skills.  Understand processes for meeting academic needs of students, how to collect and analyze data, select and implement evidence-based interventions, and evaluate outcomes.

4.  Socialization and Development of Life Skills.  Have knowledge of behavioral, affective, social and life needs, select and implement evidence-based interventions, and evaluate outcomes.

5.  Student Diversity in Development and Learning.  In conjunction with other areas of competence and skills, understand how diversity (including but not limited to race, culture, ethnicity, SES, gender, and disability) may impact decisions regarding individuals and programs.

6.  School and Systems Organization, Policy Development, and Climate.  Have knowledge of history, policies, and systems of school organization/agency, understand how the organization/agency operate, and facilitate policies that promote positive learning environments.

7.  Prevention, Crisis Intervention, and Mental Health.  Have knowledge and skills to promote the mental health and physical well-being of students within the service parameters of the organization/agency, individually or through systemic programs.

8.  Home/School/Community Collaboration.  Able to work effectively with families, educators, and others in the community in meeting individual and family needs of students and actively promote parent involvement.

9.  Research and Program Evaluation.  Use data from scholarly literature or local data collection to implement and evaluate intervention for collection to implement and evaluate intervention for individual as well as systemic programs.

10.  School Psychology Practice and Development.  Practice in ways that are consistent with professional and ethical standards and participates in opportunities for professional development in order to increase knowledge and skills.

11.  Information Technology.  Use technology to increase efficiency in completing duties, in acquiring and disseminating information, and in ways that safeguard the quality of services.

Thank you for participation in this survey.



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Survey of Employers of Graduates

(Appendix F)


Name and title (person completing form): ________________________________________

Organization/agency: _________________________________________________________

Date survey completed: ___________________  Employee’s name: ___________________

Number of MSU School Psychology graduates hired within the past five years: _______

Overall, rate the preparation of the MSU school psychology graduate (s) for employment within your organization/agency.  Circle one:

Exceptional         More than            Adequate             Less than             Unprepared

                                                Adequate                                             Adequate

Comment: ___________________________________________________________________

Please rate the employee on each of the following areas of competence or skill:

Areas of Competence or Skill

Above

Average

Average

Below Average

Comment, particularly if below average

1. Data-Based Decision-Making and Accountability. The employee understands and uses various methods of assessment and uses collected data to make decisions regarding individual and program needs.

2. Consultation and Collaboration.  The employee has knowledge of consultative and collaborative models and methods and demonstrates effective skills in regards to academic and behavioral concerns.

3.  Effective Instruction and Development of Cognitive/Academic Skills.  The employee understands processes for meeting academic needs of students, how to collect and analyze data, select and implement evidence-based interventions, and evaluate outcomes.

4.  Socialization and Development of Life Skills. The employee has knowledge of behavioral, affective, social and life skills development and uses this knowledge to assess needs, select and implement evidence-based interventions, and evaluate outcomes.

5.  Student Diversity in Development and Learning.  In conjunction with other areas of competence and skills, the employee understands how diversity (including but not limited to race, culture, ethnicity, SES, gender, and disability) may impact decisions regarding individuals and programs.

6.  School and Systems Organization, Policy Development, and Climate.   The employee has knowledge of the history, policies, and systems of your organization/agency, understands how the organization/agency operates, and facilitates policies that promote positive learning environments.

7.  Prevention, Crisis Intervention, and Mental Health.  The employee has knowledge and skills to promote the mental health and physical well-being of students within the service parameters of the organization/agency, individually or through systemic programs.

8.  Home/School/Community Collaboration.  The employee works effectively with families, educators, and others in the community in meeting individual and family needs of students and actively promotes parent involvement.

9.  Research and Program Evaluation.  The employee uses data from scholarly literature or local data collection to implement and evaluate intervention for individual as well as systemic programs.

10.  School Psychology Practice and Development.  The employee practices in ways that a consistent with professional and ethical standards and participate in opportunities for professional development in order to increase his or her knowledge and skills.

11.  Information Technology.  The employee uses technology to increase efficiency in completing duties, in acquiring and disseminating information, and in ways that safeguard the quality of services.

Thank you for participation in this survey.



Image 10

Admission Evaluation Form

(Appendix G)


Applicant’s Name  ________________________________________

Bachelor’s received from _______________________________            Date_______________

Points for Experience

Social Work       Counselor       Elem.Teacher     LD/SpED                                                                          _____

                          5                        5                        8                          10              

GPA          __________

2.50 -2.75            2.76-3.00          3.01-3.50              3.51-3.75           3.75-4.00                                                  _____

          0                        5                        7                          9                          10

GRE          __________          __________          __________

                 Verbal                            Quantitative                 Total

                     

                      Minimum 800 Required     <800                    800-865             866  +                           

                            0                          10                           15                   

GRE Analytic Writing _________                                                                                                               _____

                                                                                                                                TOTAL GRE

Image 11Recommendations*:

1.  ________________                         Average                         Good                    Outstanding

2.  ________________                         Average                         Good                    Outstanding

3.  ________________                         Average                         Good                    Outstanding

                                                                     0                                  5                            10

*a poor recommendation removes the applicant from consideration                                                                                  _____

Personal Statement

                                      Poor                Average                         Good                    Outstanding

                                                                    0                                    5                          10                                                      _____

Bonus Points, up to 7, for field, minority status, experience                                                            _____

                                                                                                              TOTAL POINTS                    ________

Image 12


Decision Made                                 YES                                NO

to Interview?                                     Average                         Good                    Outstanding

                                                                     0                                  5                            10                                                     _____

Goal Orientation                             Average                         Good                    Outstanding

                                                                     0                                  5                            10                                                     _____

Accepted       Rejected

Comments:  ____________________________________________________________________



                    

                                                                                                

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