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“The series takes as its premise the societal need to discuss in civil fashion topics about which we tend to hold strong and impassioned opinions. Too often, we are simply shouting at each other or we don’t discuss the topics at all — which means that we are not updating our perspective, even as the world keeps turning and changing around us. Further, universities are by definition the repositories and testing grounds for ideas big and small, so even as much research carried out on campuses is geared towards pre-professional and professional audiences, they are also part of communities, so natural forums for the discussion of ideas important to most everyone.”
Robert Kibler, chair of the Division of Humanities

University Communications

Division of Humanities begins Campus and Community Dialogue Series

MINOT, N.D. – The Minot State University Division of Humanities debuted a new Campus and Community Dialogue Series Tuesday at the Northwest Arts Gallery.

The event, titled “Is Religion Still Relevant?,” lasted an hour and a half and attracted nearly 100 individuals from both on and off the Minot State campus.

“The series takes as its premise the societal need to discuss in civil fashion topics about which we tend to hold strong and impassioned opinions,” said Robert Kibler, professor of literature and humanities and chair of the Division of Humanities, about the event in a release. “Too often, we are simply shouting at each other or we don’t discuss the topics at all — which means that we are not updating our perspective, even as the world keeps turning and changing around us. Further, universities are by definition the repositories and testing grounds for ideas big and small, so even as much research carried out on campuses is geared towards pre-professional and professional audiences, they are also part of communities, so natural forums for the discussion of ideas important to most everyone.”

Each installment of the Campus and Community Dialogue Series features a moderator and two or more faculty or community members organize some basic and differing ideas about the topic. For the first event, Micah Bloom (Art) and Robert Kibler (English) offered differing perspectives, and Christina Paxman (Communication Arts) moderated.

The next Campus and Community Dialogue Series will take place during Shakespeare-Fest, on Tuesday, April 24. The second event is titled “Should We Just Get rid of Shakespeare? A Discussion About the Contemporary University Curriculum.” There is no charge for the events.

ABOUT MINOT STATE UNIVERSITY
Minot State University is a public university dedicated to excellence in education, scholarship, and community engagement achieved through rigorous academic experiences, active learning environments, commitment to public service, and a vibrant campus life.

Published: 02/21/18



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