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MSU Teacher Education Unit (TEU)

B.S.Ed. with a major in History

BSE in History requires 128 hours minimum
*Credits are in semester hours

History

North Dakota State Standards 8.22 (History)

8.22.1 In the subject major curriculum, the program requires the study of the nature and scope of history of the United States and globally and the study of a second social science beyond the introductory level. The program uses a variety of performance assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

Historyís required core (39 cr) ensures that candidates receive rigorous methodological training while retaining the flexibility to tailor an individualized program within broad guidelines that ensure a distribution of coursework across the departmentís diverse curriculum.
Specifically, in section A of the program, "Surveys," candidates are required to take six credit hours of course work among a list that includes the two U. S. history surveys, the two western civilization surveys, and one world civilization survey. Although candidates can elect to take more survey hours (See Section C: Chronological History Electives), capable students are encouraged to do more of their work toward the degree within upper level electives, with a corresponding increase in focus on undergraduate research. Section B of the program, "Historical Methodology," requires candidates to take six credit hours of course work intended to support the programís emphasis on undergraduate research. Section C and D of the program, "Chronological History Electives (6 cr)" and "Distributed History Electives (21 cr)" provide a range of coverage across categories of chronology, geographic region (U. S., European, and non-western), and theme or topic. By limiting the number of courses at the 100- and 200-level candidates can take, the program ensures that upper level course work, with its accompanying emphasis on research, critical and analytical thinking, and writing, becomes the focus of the candidatesí historical training. Although the History Department has always encouraged its candidates to take elective credit in additional social science disciplines, this recommendation has now become proscriptive. The requirements of "Social Science Support Courses (12 cr)," provide serious study of a second social science discipline beyond the introductory level. It enables the candidate to acquire the requisite number of hours required by the state to teach in a second social studies discipline.

8.22.2 The program requires study of structure, key concepts, methodology, and generalizations that connect the various social studies, including the examination of professional standards and expectations for P-12 education. The program uses a variety of performance assessments of candidatesí understanding and ability to apply that knowledge.

All candidates must take 6 credits of Historical Methodology:

*History 280 Practice and Method. This colloquium introduces candidates to the tools, research and writing methods, resources and theoretical approaches required in upper level history courses. It includes s small candidate-initiated research project that will allow candidates to refine their skills. The course also features discussion of readings that illustrate a wide variety of historical approaches and methods.

*History 401 Historiography. A course to consider both the philosophy or theory of history as well as the mechanics of "doing" history.

All candidates must take SS390 Secondary History/Social Science Teaching Methods. This is a methods course designed for those intending to teach history and social studies at the secondary level. The course includes a study of classroom techniques, a micro-teaching experience, and a practicum in a secondary level social studies classroom. As part of their Professional Education Sequence, all candidates must take 25 credits of education courses that include as part of their curricula the examination of professional standards and expectations for P-12 education.

8.22.3 The program requires study of multi-cultural, cross-cultural, diversity, global issues and multiple perspectives. The program uses a variety of performance assessments of candidatesí understanding and ability to apply that knowledge.

All candidates must take 39 credits of history courses. The history department ensures that all candidates study history subject matter and methodology through such perspectives as globalism, multiculturalism, gender, and ethnicity. Distributed History electives ensure that all candidates take six credits of upper level U. S., six credits of upper level European, six credits of upper level non-western, and three credits of topical/thematic history courses.
In addition, all candidates are required to take SS 283 Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in America, a course that examines the historical development of American ethnic and cultural diversity, including Native American, and places that diversity in global perspective.

8.22.4 The program requires study of current events including controversial issues. The program uses a variety of performance assessments of candidatesí understanding and ability to apply that knowledge.

All candidates are required to take six credits of Chronological History Electives, three of those credits must be taken in courses whose thematic material is classified as "since 1900." All candidates, then, study course material that takes them into the present and the study of current events, including controversial issues. In addition, any number of upper level history electives as well as the second half of the survey courses presents material directly relevant to current events. Moreover, in all of its courses, the history department ensures that all candidates make connections to the present, as the past continually informs the present.
All candidates are required to take History 280 Practice and Method. Part of the curriculum for this course involves a study of contemporary controversial historical issues. Recent topics have included the Enola Gay exhibit controversy at the Smithsonian Institution and the National History Standards controversy.
All candidates are required to take SS 283 Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in America. Most readings deal directly with current events. As ethnic and cultural issues are often controversial, all candidates confront and deal with these issues directly. Examples of reading material for the course can be found at http://history.minotstateu.edu:8080/ss283f2003ethnicj under "Readings" and "Group Assignments."

8.22.5 The program requires studying methods of teaching social studies including current trends in social studies with an examination of various teaching methods and techniques. The program uses a variety of performance assessments of candidatesí understanding and ability to apply that knowledge.

All candidates are required to take SS 390 Secondary History/Social Science Teaching Methods. This is a methods course designed for those intending to teach history and social studies at the secondary level. The course includes a study of classroom techniques, a micro-teaching experience, and a practicum in a secondary level social studies classroom. Each candidate must also complete Education 493 Student Teaching, supervised teaching in secondary school. Prerequisites include recommendation by the candidateís advisor, division/department chair, and TEAC; admission to Teacher Education; and completion of all other required education coursework.

8.22.6 The program requires the study of current, appropriate instructional technologies. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

The History Department incorporates technology into all of its courses. It has led the university in the use of collaborative software to facilitate teaching, strengthen learning outcomes, and foster candidate interaction. In addition, each candidate is required to take ED 380 Technology in Teaching 2 cr. Candidates learn strategies for the instructional uses of technology including multimedia presentation, e-mail, internet, spreadsheets, data bases, and emerging technologies.