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MSU Teacher Education Unit (TEU)

B.S.Ed. with a major in Biology

BSE in Biology requires 144-147 hours minimum
Credits are semester hours

Biology

North Dakota Sate Standards 8.21 (Science)

8.21.1B CONTENT: Biology
The BSE- Biology Program offers majors a broad-based, contemporary biology education.

Study includes:
* Cellular and Molecular Biology
* Organismal Biology- Botany and Zoology
* Population Biology and Ecology
* Genetics
* Chemistry, Physics, and Geoscience
* Statistics
* Research Opportunity
* Professional Education

See above for program requirements. It is useful to note that biology is a diverse field of scientific inquiry relying on a broad-based curriculum that includes biology, mathematics and statistics, chemistry, physics, and, in the case of the BSE-Biology program, geosciences. While students acquire most of there specific biological instruction by taking biology courses, it is important not to consider coursework from the other scientific areas as separate but as completely integrated.

8.21.2 NATURE OF SCIENCE
The program requires study of the history and philosophy of science as well as interrelationships among the sciences. The program uses varied performance assessments of candidate’s understanding and ability to apply that knowledge.

Examples of performance assessments may include how to...
* assist students in understanding that study of science is continuous, integrated process of observing, questioning, investigating, reflecting
* construct age-appropriate learning activities that assist students’ understanding of common scientific concepts such as systems, evidence, models, constancy and change, form and function
* engage students in comparing and contrasting scientific and nonscientific ways of knowing; integrating criteria of science in investigations and case studies
* develop learning experiences for students which demonstrate an interdisciplinary understanding of science
* develop student understanding of the relationships that exist among science, technology, societal needs, and community issues

The biology program requires three introductory courses that also satisfy campus-wide General Education courses (Biol 150, 151, 154). Each of these courses addresses various historical aspects of science as well as the basic nature of science (i.e., scientific method). The so-called history of biology also permeates all biology course offerings.

Performance assessment of candidate’s abilities to apply this knowledge in teaching is integrated into SCI 391 Teaching Science in the Secondary School, which includes a teaching practicum in the public schools, and ED 493 Student Teaching.

8.21.3 INQUIRY
The program requires study of the processes of science common to all scientific fields. The program uses varied performance assessments of candidate’s understanding and ability to apply that knowledge.

Examples of performance assessments may include how to...
* locate resources, design and conduct inquiry-based, open-ended investigations, interpret findings, communicate results, make judgments based on evidence
* use listening and questioning strategies that encourage inquiry and probe for divergent student responses * plan/implement data-based activities requiring students to reflect upon their findings, make inferences, and link new ideas to preexisting knowledge
* encourage productive peer interaction and plan both individual and small group activities to facilitate inquiry
* promote student use of scientific process, decision-making, and analysis skills for investigating science-related real-life problems

The process of scientific inquiry is integrated in some way into all biology courses taken by candidates. In several courses, including the introductory sequence, students are afforded the opportunity to conduct inquiry using the scientific method. Assessment of candidate’s abilities to apply this knowledge in teaching is integrated into SCI 391 Teaching Science in the Secondary School, which includes a teaching practicum in the public schools, and ED 493 Student Teaching.

8.21.4 CONTEXT OF SCIENCE
The program requires the study of the effect of social and technological context on the study of science and on the application and valuing of scientific knowledge. The program prepares candidates to relate science to the daily lives and interests of students and to a larger framework of human endeavor and understanding. The program provides the candidate with an understanding of the relationship of science to industry, business, government, and multicultural aspects of a variety of communities. The program uses varied performance assessments of candidate’s understanding and ability to apply that knowledge.
Examples of performance assessments may include how to...
* engage students in activities and projects in which they examine important social or technological issues and implications related to their discipline(s)
* analyze how ethics and values affect scientific knowledge and its applications in technology and society
* relate science to the personal lives and interests of students, to potential careers, and to knowledge in other domains
* use data relevant to a variety of communities, their culture, and their resources to relate science lessons that are appropriate for those communities

The context of science is integrated to introductory biology courses (the Cultural strand). The impact of the biological sciences on the human condition is reflected upon primarily within the introductory courses but also within specific upper-division courses in biology.

Performance assessment of candidate’s abilities to apply this knowledge in teaching is integrated into SCI 391 Teaching Science in the Secondary School, which includes a teaching practicum in the public schools, and ED 493 Student Teaching.

8.21.5 SKILLS OF TEACHING
The program requires the candidate to demonstrate proficiency in methods of teaching science. The program uses varied performance assessments of candidate’s understanding and ability to apply that knowledge.

Examples of performance assessments may include the candidates being able to...
* foster competency in the use of scientific processes to investigate phenomena, interpret findings, and communicate results
* engage all students in the study of science, providing for differences in gender, socioeconomic background, culture, ethnicity, academic ability and disabilities
* select and use a variety of age-appropriate instructional strategies, materials, and assessment methods for teaching and evaluating student success in science
* identify goals, objectives and related assessment in science instruction
* state a philosophy and provide a rationale for choosing particular science teaching strategies
* identify common student misconceptions or naïve conceptions in the content field, their source, and appropriate teaching responses
* reinforce the learning and understanding of key concepts from several perspectives
* apply grade-level appropriate mathematical and computer skills to the scientific investigation of phenomena and the analysis of data

General methods of teaching are learned by candidates in courses that are part of the Professional Education Sequence. Methods of teaching science are covered specifically in SCI 391 Teaching Science in the Secondary School. This course is designed to acquaint the candidate with down-to-earth approaches for teaching "hands-on" science at the secondary level. Emphasis is placed on learning theory, lesson and curriculum design, and instruction methods. Among specific topics addressed by SCI 391 are: design and delivery of "hands-on" science lessons, utilization of educational resource materials required for the design and delivery of such lessons, identification and guidance of reasoning skills required for the scientific enterprise (including guided induction by questioning), appropriate use of media, classroom management skills, construction and delivery of both written and practical examinations, politics of the education profession, and defense of personal philosophical positions on science education.

Performance assessment of candidate’s abilities to apply this knowledge in teaching is integrated into SCI 391 Teaching Science in the Secondary School, which includes a teaching practicum in the public schools, and ED 493 Student Teaching.

8.21.6 CURRICULUM
The program provides candidates with information necessary to identify, evaluate, and apply a coherent, focused science curriculum that is consistent with state and national standards for science education and appropriate for addressing the needs, abilities, and interests of students. The program uses varied performance assessments of candidate’s understanding and ability to apply that knowledge.

Examples of performance assessments may include how to...
* relate instructional goals, materials, and actions to state and national science education standards, analyzing strengths and weaknesses in a particular classroom context
* identify, evaluate and assemble science curriculum and instructional materials from a variety of sources, including the internet
* develop and implement long-range and unit plans, with clear rationales, goals, methods, materials and assessments
* understand the role of technology in education and define a rationale and long-range strategy for including technology in science education
* design and implement learning activities that thematically relate science with other school subjects and community resources

General aspects of curricula are learned by candidates in courses that are part of the Professional Education Sequence (particularly ED 320 Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment). Curricular aspects of teaching science are covered specifically in SCI 391 Teaching Science in the Secondary School. This course is designed to acquaint the candidate with down-to-earth approaches for teaching "hands-on" science at the secondary level. Emphasis is placed on learning theory, lesson and curriculum design, and instruction methods. Among specific topics addressed by SCI 391 are: design and delivery of "hands-on" science lessons, utilization of educational resource materials required for the design and delivery of such lessons, identification and guidance of reasoning skills required for the scientific enterprise (including guided induction by questioning), appropriate use of media, classroom management skills, construction and delivery of both written and practical examinations, politics of the education profession, and defense of personal philosophical positions on science education.

Performance assessment of candidate’s abilities to apply this knowledge in teaching is integrated into SCI 391 Teaching Science in the Secondary School, which includes a teaching practicum in the public schools, and ED 493 Student Teaching.

8.21.7 ASSESSMENT
The program prepares candidates to use a variety of performance assessment strategies to evaluate the intellectual, social, and personal development of the learner in all aspects of science.<.p>

Examples of performance assessments may include experience with and knowledge of how to...
* identify and use the most appropriate methods for gathering information about student learning
* align assignments with instructional objectives
* demonstrate the ability to use multiple strategies to assess teaching and learning authentically, consistent with national standards and goals for science education
* engage in reflective self-assessment and develop a system for self-assessment as a practicing teacher

General aspects of assessment are learned by candidates in courses that are part of the Professional Education Sequence (particularly ED 320 Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment). Assessment aspects of teaching science are covered specifically in SCI 391 Teaching Science in the Secondary School. This course is designed to acquaint the candidate with down-to-earth approaches for teaching "hands-on" science at the secondary level. Emphasis is placed on learning theory, lesson and curriculum design, and instruction methods. Among specific topics addressed by SCI 391 are: design and delivery of "hands-on" science lessons, utilization of educational resource materials required for the design and delivery of such lessons, identification and guidance of reasoning skills required for the scientific enterprise (including guided induction by questioning), appropriate use of media, classroom management skills, construction and delivery of both written and practical examinations, politics of the education profession, and defense of personal philosophical positions on science education.

Performance assessment of candidate’s abilities to apply this knowledge in teaching is integrated into SCI 391 Teaching Science in the Secondary School, which includes a teaching practicum in the public schools, and ED 493 Student Teaching.

8.21.8 ENVIRONMENT FOR LEARNING
The program prepares candidates to design and manage safe and supportive learning environments in the classroom, laboratory, and field. The program reflects high expectations for the success of all students. The program uses varied performance assessments of candidate’s understanding and ability to apply that knowledge.

Examples of performance assessments may include how to...
* maintain a positive classroom environment conducive to learning of science
* identify and promote the elements of an engaging and stimulating science learning environment
* plan and develop opportunities for students to investigate and learn from resources, artifacts, exhibits, events, displays and the environment
* structure age-appropriate laboratory and field experiences for students
* help students understand the appropriate use of scientific equipment and materials
* set up procedures for safe handling, labeling and storage of chemicals, electrical equipment, and other materials and know actions to take to prevent or report an emergency
* demonstrate knowledge of legal responsibilities and know how to act to prevent potential problems with liability and negligence, especially as applied to science teaching
* practice the safe and ethical use and care of animals for science instruction within the standards and recommendations of the science community and applicable regulations

Candidates learn general aspects of learning environments in courses that are part of the Professional Education Sequence (particularly ED 460 Managing the Learning Environment, and ED 470 Teaching Diverse Learners). Learning environment aspects of teaching science are covered specifically in SCI 391 Teaching Science in the Secondary School. This course is designed to acquaint the candidate with down-to-earth approaches for teaching "hands-on" science at the secondary level. Emphasis is placed on learning theory, lesson and curriculum design, and instruction methods. Among specific topics addressed by SCI 391 are: design and delivery of "hands-on" science lessons, utilization of educational resource materials required for the design and delivery of such lessons, identification and guidance of reasoning skills required for the scientific enterprise (including guided induction by questioning), appropriate use of media, classroom management skills, construction and delivery of both written and practical examinations, politics of the education profession, and defense of personal philosophical positions on science education.

Performance assessment of candidate’s abilities to apply this knowledge in teaching is integrated into SCI 391 Teaching Science in the Secondary School, which includes a teaching practicum in the public schools, and ED 493 Student Teaching.

8.21.9 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE
The program prepares candidates to participate in the professional community, improving practice through their personal actions, education and development. The program uses varied performance assessments of candidate’s understanding and ability to apply that knowledge.

Examples of performance assessments may include how to...
* developing and stating personal goals and a philosophy of teaching based on research and contemporary values of the science education community
* demonstrating understanding of the concept of a community of learners and interacting with instructors and peers as a member of such a community
* documenting and reflecting upon personal strengths and weaknesses in an effort to improve their preparation to teach science
* taking personal responsibility for growth and assisting others who are preparing to teach science
* demonstrating the ability to handle problems and tension calmly and effectively, and relating to students, peers, instructors, and supervisors with integrity
* participating in professional associations and activities and reading professional journals in an effort to improve teaching and stay abreast of current events and needs in the field

The biology program at Minot State University is an extremely successful program that fosters a learning atmosphere where students (learners) are actively engaged in learning. Many of our courses rely on the primary biological literature for content allowing learners (students) to stay abreast of trends in contemporary biology.

Performance assessment of candidate’s abilities to apply this knowledge in teaching is integrated into SCI 391 Teaching Science in the Secondary School, which includes a teaching practicum in the public schools, and ED 493 Student Teaching.

8.21.10 TECHNOLOGY
The program requires the study of current, appropriate instructional technologies. The program uses varied performance assessments of candidate’s understanding and ability to apply that knowledge.

Examples of performance assessments may include how to...
* demonstrate appropriate use of various technologies with their teaching
* select and use appropriate technology tools specific to their content area(s)
* use technology to effectively manage communications, instructional planning, record keeping and data management
* use instructional technologies, including computers, interactive video, telecommunications, and other new technologies to promote use of scientific processes and problem-solving skills

Candidates learn current, appropriate use of instructional technologies in Education courses (ED 320 Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment, ED 380 Technology in Teaching). Learning to use technology appropriately in teaching science is covered specifically in SCI 391 Teaching Science in the Secondary School. This course is designed to acquaint the candidate with down-to-earth approaches for teaching "hands-on" science at the secondary level. Emphasis is placed on learning theory, lesson and curriculum design, and instruction methods. Among specific topics addressed by SCI 391 are: design and delivery of "hands-on" science lessons, utilization of educational resource materials required for the design and delivery of such lessons, identification and guidance of reasoning skills required for the scientific enterprise (including guided induction by questioning), appropriate use of media, classroom management skills, construction and delivery of both written and practical examinations, politics of the education profession, and defense of personal philosophical positions on science education.

Performance assessment of candidate’s abilities to apply this knowledge in teaching is integrated into SCI 391 Teaching Science in the Secondary School, which includes a teaching practicum in the public schools, and ED 493 Student Teaching.