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MSU Teacher Education Unit (TEU)

B.S.Ed. with a major in Elementary Education

BSE in Elementary Education requires 128 hours minimum
* Credits are semester hours

Elementary Education

North Dakota State Standards 8.08 (Elementary Education)

Standard 8.9-1: The program requires the study of development, learning and motivation-Candidates know, understand and use the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to the development of children and young adolescents to construct learning opportunities that support individual studentsí development, acquisition of knowledge, and motivation. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

All candidates are required to take PSY 255 Child and Adolescent Development. This course focuses on developing an understanding of all three domains of development as well as a knowledge base in relation to theories of development. In addition, all candidates are required to take ED 310 Foundations of Education. This course requires candidates to further refine their understanding of development, theories of development and theoretical models of teaching and learning. Together these courses build the knowledge base of candidates in relation to the development of children and young adolescents.

All candidates are required to take the elementary education "block" methods courses: ED 421 Elementary Math Methods; ED 422, Elementary Language Arts Methods; ED 423, Elementary Reading Methods; ED 424, Elementary Social Studies Methods; and, SCI 426, Elementary Science Methods. These courses provide candidates the opportunity to apply their knowledge base in relation to development and learning to the construction of learning opportunities for students. Finally, student teaching requires candidates to demonstrate mastery of the ability to construct learning opportunities that support studentsí development, acquisition of knowledge and motivation.

Sample Performance Assessments*:
PSY 255: Novel based case studies
ED 310: Written statement of philosophy of education and learning theory
ED 421: INTASC Assessment #2, math units for practicum
ED 422: INTASC Assessment #2, Patterned Writing, Author/Illustrator Project
ED 423: INTASC Assessment #2, Patterned Writing, Author/Illustrator Project
ED 424: INTASC Assessment #2, Patterned Writing
SCI 426: INTASC Assessment #2, science units for practicum
Student Teaching: Student Teaching evaluations

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit and/or the elementary education program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

Standard 8.9-2a: The program requires the study of central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of content-Candidates know, understand, and use the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of content for students across the elementary grades and can create meaningful learning experiences that develop studentsí competence in subject matter and skills for various developmental levels. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

The general education sequence provides much of the knowledge base relevant to this standard. All candidates take 3 credits of history, 2 credits in wellness and personal development, 6 credits of social sciences, 6 credits in humanities, 8 credits of laboratory science, 9 credits of english/communication, and 4 credits of mathematics (a minimum of college level algebra is required).

The foundation provided by the general education sequence is then built upon with additional coursework in elementary curricular areas (music, art, physical education and health, English and literature, science, mathematics, and social sciences). These courses include: MUS 101 Introduction to Music Fundamentals and MUS 301 Elementary Music Methods; ART 201 Art Methods for Elementary Education; HPER 340 Elementary Methods and Activities and HPER 210; ENG 238 Childrenís Literature and ED 352 Foundations of Reading; GEOL 108 Earth and Planetary Science; MATH 277 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I and MATH 377 Mathematics for Elementary Methods II; and SS 283 Ethnic Experience in America. Finally, candidates apply their knowledge bases to the construction of meaningful learning experiences in the elementary "blocks" methods courses (ED 421 Elementary Math Methods; ED 422, Elementary Language Arts Methods; ED 423, Elementary Reading Methods; ED 424, Elementary Social Studies Methods; and, SCI 426, Elementary Science Methods), as well as in the student teaching experience. A more detailed description of each area is given below under the appropriate standard (8.9-2b through 8.9-2h). Performance assessments are also discussed under the standard directly relevant to each discipline.

Standard 8.9-2b: The program requires the study of English language arts-Candidates demonstrate a high level of competence in use of the English language arts and they know, understand, and use concepts from reading, language and child development, to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help students successfully apply their developing skills to many different situations, materials, and ideas. The program uses varied assessment of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

The development of a high level of competence in the English language arts is infused throughout the program. A significant number of courses in the elementary education major, the general education program and the professional sequence require substantial use of these skills. All candidates are required to take ENG 110, ENG 120 as well as COMM 110 Fundamentals of Public Speaking. In addition, all candidates must have a 2.5 GPA for this coursework (and no grade below a "C") before they are admitted to teacher education. All candidates are required to take ENG 238 Childrenís Literature as well as ED 352 Foundations of Reading. These two courses expand the knowledge base of candidates to include education specific resources, ideas and techniques within the area of the English language arts.

Candidates apply their knowledge bases to the teaching of reading, writing, speaking, listening and viewing during their coursework for ED 422 Elementary Language Arts Methods and ED 423 Elementary Reading Methods through substantial peer teaching experiences. During the practicum component of the elementary "blocks" methods courses which lasts for five weeks of full day time in an elementary classroom, candidates further solidify their teaching skills Finally, student teaching requires candidates to demonstrate mastery of both content and pedagogy in relationship to the teaching of reading, writing, listening, speaking and viewing.

Sample Performance assessments*:
ENG 238: Childrenís literature evaluations and reflections
ED 352: Quizzes and final exam; Mini-lessons
ED 422: Final Project (schedule, literacy program description); INTASC Assessment #1 for language arts
ED 423: Final Project (schedule, literacy program description); INTASC Assessment #1 for reading
Student Teaching: Student Teaching evaluations

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit and/or the elementary education program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

Standard 8.9-2c: The program requires the study of science-Candidates know, understand, and use fundamental concepts in the subject matter of science, including physical, life, and earth and space sciences, as well as concepts in science and technology, science in personal and social perspectives, the history and nature of science, the unifying concepts of science, and the inquiry processes scientists use in discovery of new knowledge to build a basis for scientific and technological literacy. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

All candidates are required to take four credits of life science and four credits of physical science at the general education level. In addition, elementary education candidates are now required to take GEOL 108 Earth and Planetary Science. GEOL 108 is a recent course addition to reflect current state standards in relation to science preparation. These three courses, in the areas of life, physical, earth and space sciences, provide an important knowledge base for candidates.

Candidates further expand their knowledge base and their teaching skills during SCI 426 Elementary Science Methods, through substantive peer teaching and pre-practicum experiences. Candidates also apply their knowledge bases to the teaching of science during the practicum component of the elementary "blocks" methods courses, specifically within SCI 426 Elementary Science Methods. Finally, student teaching requires candidates to demonstrate mastery of both content and pedagogy in relationship to the teaching of science.

Sample Performance Assessments*:
*GEOL 108: Unit examinations
*SCI 426: Science units for practicum; INTASC Assessment #1 for science
Student Teaching: Student Teaching evaluations

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit or the elementary education program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

Standard 8.9-2d: The program requires the study of mathematics-Candidates know, understand, and use the major concepts, procedures, and reasoning processes of mathematics that define number systems and number sense, geometry, measurement, statistics and probability, and algebra in order to foster student understanding and use of patterns, quantities, and spatial relationships that can represent phenomena, solve problems, and manage data. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

All candidates are required to take four credits of general education mathematics (a minimum of college level algebra is required). In addition, candidates build their content area knowledge in mathematics in MATH 277 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I and MATH 377 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II. Together all three of these courses provide the foundation for elementary education candidates in the specific areas described in this standard. Candidates further expand their knowledge base and their teaching skills during ED 421 Elementary Math Methods, through substantive peer teaching and pre-practicum experiences. Candidates also apply their knowledge bases to the teaching of mathematics during the practicum component of the elementary "blocks" methods courses, specifically within MATH 421 Elementary Math Methods. Finally, student teaching requires candidates to demonstrate mastery of both content and pedagogy in relationship to the teaching of mathematics.

Sample Performance Assessments*:
MATH 277: Course exams
MATH 377: Course exams
ED 421: Pre and post mathematics test; math units for practicum; INTASC Assessment #1 for mathematics
Student Teaching: Student teaching evaluations

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit and/or elementary program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

Standard 8.9-2e: The program requires the study of social studies-Candidates know, understand and use the major concepts and modes of inquiry from the social studies-the integrated study of history, geography, the social sciences, and other related areas-to promote elementary studentsí abilities to make informed decisions as citizens of a culturally diverse democratic society and interdependent world. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

All candidates are required to take three credits of history and six credits in the social sciences as part of the general education requirement. In addition, all candidates must take SS 283 The Ethnic Experience in America (an education core course) which focuses on our culturally diverse democratic society and thereby significantly contributes to this standard.

Candidates further expand their knowledge base and their teaching skills during ED 424 Elementary Social Studies Methods through a variety of classroom activities. Candidates also apply their knowledge bases to the teaching of social studies during the practicum component of the elementary "blocks" methods courses, specifically within ED 424 Elementary Social Studies Methods. Finally, student teaching requires candidates to demonstrate mastery of both content and pedagogy in relationship to the teaching of the social sciences.

Sample Performance Assessments*:
SS 283: Annotated bibliography project
ED 424: Geography tour; poster research; INTASC Assessment #1 for social studies
Student Teaching: Student Teaching evaluations

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit and/or elementary program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

8.9-2f. The program requires the study of the arts-Candidates know, understand, and use-as appropriate to their own knowledge and skills-the content, functions, and achievements of dance, music, theater, and the several visual arts as primary media for communication, inquiry, and insight among elementary students. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

All candidates are required to take six credits of humanities within the general education program. These courses function as general background for candidates in relationship to this standard. All candidates are also required to take MUS 101 Fundamentals of Music, ART 201 Art Methods for Elementary Teachers, MUS 301 Music Methods for Elementary Teachers and HPER 340 Elementary Methods and Activities. The syllabi for these courses reflect content in the areas relevant to this standard.

Sample Performance Assessments*:
ART 201: Peer teaching (rubric and description in course folder)
MUS 101: Course exams
MUS 301: Unit plans
HPER 340: Lesson plans for peer teaching; lesson plans for elementary teaching

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit and/or elementary program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

8.9-2g. The program requires the study of health education-Candidates know, understand, and use the major concepts in the subject matter of health education to create opportunities for student development and practice of skills that contribute to good health. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

All candidates are required to take two credits of wellness and personal development within the general education program. In addition, all elementary education candidates are required to take HPER 210 First Aid and CPR which builds background knowledge in relation to health education.

The content and pedagogy of health education is a component of HPER 340 Elementary Methods and Activities, including the completion of an HIV/AIDS workshop with certification to teach in the public schools.

Sample Performance Assessments*:
HPER 340: written exams; lesson plans; HIV/AIDS workshop performance
Student Teaching: Student teaching evaluations

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit and/or elementary program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

8.9-2h: The program requires the study of physical education-Candidates know, understand and use-as appropriate to their own understanding and skills-human movement and physical activity as central elements to foster active, healthy life styles and enhanced quality of life for elementary students. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

All candidates are required to take two credits of wellness and personal development within the general education program. In addition, all candidates in the elementary program area take HPER 340 Elementary Methods and Activities which focuses on developing candidate knowledge and skills in the area of teaching physical activity and human movement. This course involves substantive peer teaching as well as teaching of elementary age students.

Sample Performance Assessments*:
HPER 340: written exams; philosophy of elementary physical education; lesson plans for peer teaching and elementary teaching episodes

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit and/or elementary program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

8.9-2i. The program requires the study of connections across the curriculum-Candidates know, understand, and use the connections among concepts, procedures, and applications from content areas to motivate elementary students, build understanding, and encourage the application of knowledge, skills, tools, and ideas to real world issues. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

Throughout the program, candidates develop requisite knowledge in content areas (as described in previous standards) which is foundational for their ability to integrate curricular material in a meaningful manner.

During the elementary "blocks" methods courses (ED 421 Elementary Math Methods; ED 422, Elementary Language Arts Methods; ED 423, Elementary Reading Methods; ED 424, Elementary Social Studies Methods; and, SCI 426, Elementary Science Methods), integration is a major theme. The semester in which candidates take these methods courses begins with a full day symposium with all five methods course instructors which is designed to introduce students to the ideas of connections across the curriculum. In addition, candidates are required to complete an integrated unit during their practicum experience for the "blocks" experience.

Sample Performance Assessments*:
ED 421: Integrated math lesson; INTASC Assessment #7
ED 422: Patterned writing project; integrated unit plan; INTASC Assessment #7
ED 423: Patterned writing project; integrated unit plan; INTASC Assessment #7
ED 424: Patterned writing project; integrated unit plan; INTASC Assessment #7
SCI 426: Science unit plans for practicum; INTASC Assessment #7
Student Teaching: Student Teaching evaluations

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit and/or elementary program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

8.9-3a. The program requires the study of integrating and applying knowledge for instruction-Candidates plan and implement instruction based on knowledge of students, learning theory, subject matter, curricular goals, and community. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

Instructional planning skills are based upon a clear understanding of child development as well as an understanding of the specific needs of individual children. PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology (from the general education program), PSY 255 Child and Adolescent Development (an elementary education program requirement) ED 310 Foundations of Education (an education core requirement) and SPED 110 (an education core requirement) provide this foundation to candidates in elementary education.

Instructional planning skills also require an understanding of curricular goals and relevant professional, national, state and local standards. In ED 320 Curriculum, Planning and Assessment, candidates are asked to apply knowledge of child development, learning theory, instructional design, and relevant standards to the construction of lesson plans as well as a unit plan. In the elementary "blocks" methods courses (ED 421 Elementary Math Methods; ED 422, Elementary Language Arts Methods; ED 423, Elementary Reading Methods; ED 424, Elementary Social Studies Methods; and, SCI 426, Elementary Science Methods), candidates write numerous lesson plans for peer teaching and pre-practicum experiences. During the practicum component of the "blocks", candidates design and teach units in math and science as well as an integrated social studies, reading and language arts unit to elementary students. Finally, student teaching requires candidates to demonstrate mastery of instructional planning skills.

Sample Performance Assessments*:
ED 320: Unit plans
ED 421: Math unit plan for practicum; INTASC Assessment #7
ED 422: Integrated unit plan for practicum; INTASC Assessment #7
ED 423: Integrated unit plan for practicum; INTASC Assessment #7
ED 424: Integrated unit plan for practicum; INTASC Assessment #7
SCI 426: Science unit plan for practicum; INTASC Assessment #7
Student Teaching: Student Teaching evaluations

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit and/or elementary program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

8.9-3b. The program requires the study of adaptation to diverse students-Candidates understand how elementary students differ in their development and approaches to learning, and create instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse students. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

The knowledge components of this standard are addressed in SPED 110 Introduction to Exceptional Children (an education core requirement) PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology (a general education requirement), PSY 255 Child and Adolescent Development (an elementary education program requirement), and ED 310 Foundations of Education (an education core requirement). During the elementary "blocks" methods courses, candidates further expand their skills in this area through the close observation of an individual student in their elementary practicum placement and the creation of differentiated instructional pieces relevant to that student on the candidatesí lesson plans during practicum. ED 470 Teaching Diverse Learners also requires candidates to apply skills in differentiating instruction. Finally, student teaching requires candidates to demonstrate mastery in the area of adapting instruction to individual needs.

Sample Performance Assessments*:
SPED 110: Present levels of performance assignment; goals and objectives assignment; lesson plan assignment
PSY 255: Course exams; novel based case studies
ED 421: INTASC Assessment #3
ED 422: Differentiated instruction component of unit lessons; INTASC Assess. #3
ED 423: Differentiated instruction component of unit lessons; INTASC Assess. #3
ED 424: Differentiated instruction component of unit lessons; INTASC Assess. #3
ED 426: INTASC Assessment #3
ED 470: Differentiated lesson plans
Student Teaching: Student teaching evaluations

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit and/or elementary program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

8.9-3c. The program requires the study of development of critical thinking, problem solving and performance skills-Candidates understand and use a variety of teaching strategies that encourage elementary studentsí development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

Throughout the methods coursework in the elementary education program major, candidates develop and refine their skills in using a variety of instructional strategies to develop critical thinking, problem solving and performance skills in the subject areas of art, music and physical education in addition to the traditional core curriculum in elementary schools. These methods courses are: ART 201 Art Methods for Elementary Teachers, HPER 340 Elementary Methods and Activities, MUS 301 Music Methods for the Elementary Teacher and the elementary "blocks" methods courses (ED 421 Elementary Math Methods; ED 422, Elementary Language Arts Methods; ED 423, Elementary Reading Methods; ED 424, Elementary Social Studies Methods; and, SCI 426, Elementary Science Methods). ED 320 Curriculum, Planning and Assessment provides a general knowledge base of teaching strategies to candidates as well. Finally, student teaching requires candidates to demonstrate mastery using a variety of instructional strategies to maximize student learning.

Sample Performance Assessments*:
ART 201: Peer teaching
ED 320: Oral research projects; year, unit and lesson plans
HPER 340: Peer teaching; Rules and consequences assignment; Activity signs
MUS 301: Unit plans
ED 421: INTASC Assessment # 4; math unit plans for practicum
ED 422: INTASC Assessment #4; peer teaching
ED 423: INTASC Assessment #4; video taped peer teaching
ED 424: INTASC Assessment #4; peer teaching
SCI 426: INTASC Assessment #4; peer teaching
Student Teaching: Student teaching evaluations

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit and/or elementary program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

8.9-3d. The program requires the study of active engagement in learning-Candidates use their knowledge and understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior among students at the elementary level to foster active engagement in learning, self motivation, and positive social interaction and to create supportive learning environments. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

Candidatesí understandings of learning, and individual and group motivation and behavior are developed in PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology (a required general education course), PSY 255 Child and Adolescent Development and ED 310 Foundations of Education. In ED 460 Managing the Learning Environment candidates are required to reflect on their emerging philosophies of classroom management and demonstrate the ability to design management plans that facilitate student learning, positive social interaction and self-motivation. During the elementary "blocks" methods courses (ED 421 Elementary Math Methods; ED 422, Elementary Language Arts Methods; ED 423, Elementary Reading Methods; ED 424, Elementary Social Studies Methods; and, SCI 426, Elementary Science Methods), candidates continue to build their knowledge and skill base while simultaneously applying relevant concepts to their teaching experiences in their practicum settings. Finally, student teaching requires candidates to demonstrate mastery of classroom management and motivation skills.

Sample Performance Assessments*:
ED 460: Philosophy of management; classroom management plans
ED 421: INTASC Assessment #5; Unit lesson plans
ED 422: INTASC Assessment #5; Unit lesson plans
ED 423: INTASC Assessment #5; Unit lesson plans
ED 424: INTASC Assessment #5; Unit lesson plans
SCI 426: INTASC Assessment #5; Unit lesson plans
Student Teaching: Student teaching evaluations

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit and/or elementary program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

8.9-3e. The program requires the study of communication to foster learning-Candidates use their knowledge and understanding of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the elementary classroom. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

All candidates are required to take ENG 110, ENG 120 and COMM 110 Fundamentals of Public Speaking as part of their general education program. In addition, all candidates must have a 2.5 GPA in this communication component (and no grade below a "C") before they are admitted to teacher education and must demonstrate basic proficiency in the area of writing by achieving a PPST score of at least 173. Media communication skills are infused throughout the curriculum and are covered in the discussion of standard 8.9.6 (Instructional Technology). ED 380 Technology in Teaching further refines candidatesí abilities in the areas of nonverbal and media communication, including email, email attachments, databases, GIS software, powerpoint presentations, and web publishing .

During the elementary "blocks" methods courses (ED 421 Elementary Math Methods; ED 422, Elementary Language Arts Methods; ED 423, Elementary Reading Methods; ED 424, Elementary Social Studies Methods; and, SCI 426, Elementary Science Methods), candidates demonstrate the effective use of verbal, nonverbal and media communication techniques in peer teaching episodes, pre-practicum experiences as well as throughout their practicum placements. Finally, student teaching requires candidates to demonstrate mastery of communication skills.

Sample Performance Assessments*:
ED 380: Lab assignments; quizzes
ED 421: INTASC Assessment #6
ED 422: INTASC Assessment #6
ED 423: INTASC Assessment #6; video taped peer teaching
ED 424: INTASC Assessment #6
SCI 426: INTASC Assessment #6
Student Teaching: Student teaching evaluations

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit and/or elementary program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

8.9-4. The program requires the study of assessment for instruction-Candidates know, understand, and use formal and informal assessment strategies to plan, evaluate, and strengthen instruction that will promote continuous intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of each elementary student. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

Throughout the methods coursework in the elementary education program major, candidates develop their knowledge base concerning assessment and refine their skills in using a variety of assessment techniques, both formal and informal, in the subject areas of art, music and physical education in addition to the traditional core curriculum in elementary schools. These methods courses are: ART 201 Art Methods for Elementary Teachers, HPER 340 Elementary Methods and Activities, MUS 301 Music Methods for the Elementary Teacher and the elementary "blocks" methods courses (ED 421 Elementary Math Methods; ED 422, Elementary Language Arts Methods; ED 423, Elementary Reading Methods; ED 424, Elementary Social Studies Methods; and, SCI 426, Elementary Science Methods). ED 320 Curriculum, Planning and Assessment provides a general knowledge base of assessment strategies to candidates as well. Finally, student teaching requires candidates to demonstrate mastery of using a variety of assessment strategies to maximize student development and learning.

Sample Performance Assessments*:
ART 201: rubric construction
HPER 340: grading philosophy
MUS 301: peer teaching; unit plan
ED 421: INTASC Assessment #8; math unit plans; student assessment refl
. ED 422: INTASC Assessment #8; integrated unit plans; student assessment refl
. ED 423: INTASC Assessment #8; integrated unit plans; student assessment refl
. ED 424: INTASC Assessment #8; integrated unit plans; student assessment refl
. SCI 426: INTASC Assessment #8; science unit plans; student assessment refl
. Student Teaching: Student Teaching evaluations

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit and/or elementary program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

8.9-5a. The program requires the study of practices and behaviors of developing career teachers-Candidates understand and apply practices and behaviors that are characteristic of developing career teachers. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

ED 201 Introduction to Teaching is the first course candidates take within the professional education sequence. This course introduces candidates to the INTASC standards and to conceptual model of the teacher education unit. In addition, candidates engage in a field experience day, a non-academic shadow experience (such as a PTA meeting, school board meeting or professional conference) and interview a practicing teacher. Candidate self-assessment of professional dispositions occurs at four points: when applying for admission to teacher education, when applying for student teaching, at the end of student teaching, and as a practicing teacher. Candidate dispositions are also assessed by a third party at the point of admission to the program as reference forms require disposition ratings by evaluators.

The elementary "blocks" methods courses (ED 421 Elementary Math Methods; ED 422, Elementary Language Arts Methods; ED 423, Elementary Reading Methods; ED 424, Elementary Social Studies Methods; and, SCI 426, Elementary Science Methods), require candidates to demonstrate their skills in this area through the assessment of INTASC standard 9 Professional Commitment and Responsibility.

Minot State University has a very active chapter of SNDEA which provides numerous opportunities for candidates to engage in important professional development activities. Prior to student teaching, all candidates in the teacher education unit attend a student teaching seminar in which area administrators meet with candidates to describe student teacher and new teacher expectations. Finally, student teaching requires candidates to demonstrate mastery of INTASC Standard 9 Professional Commitment and Responsibility. In addition, student teachers are required to attend in-service opportunities within their student teaching placements.

Sample Performance Assessments*:
ED 201: resume; reflection journal for field experience day and non-academic shadow day
ED 421: INTASC Assessment #9
ED 422: INTASC Assessment #9
ED 423: INTASC Assessment #9
ED 424: INTASC Assessment #9
SCI 426: INTASC Assessment #9
Student Teaching: Student Teaching evaluations; reflective journals

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit and/or elementary program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

8.9-5b. The program requires the study of reflection and evaluation-Candidates are aware of and reflect on their practice in light of research on teaching and resources available for professional learning; they continually evaluate the effects of their professional decisions and actions on students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community and actively seek out opportunities to grow professionally. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

The conceptual model for the teacher education unit and of the elementary program area is "ARK" which stands for action, reflection and knowledge. Reflection is woven throughout the program, present in some form in all of the courses both within the education core and within the elementary education major. The elementary "blocks" methods courses require candidates to reflect on each lesson plan they prepare in written form, whether for peer teaching, pre-practicum or practicum. These reflections must include a written assessment of the lesson, the teacher and student learning. ED 460 Managing the Learning Environment and ED 470 Teaching Diverse Learners both also require candidates to engage in reflection about the decisions teachers make and the impact those decisions have on students, parents and other professionals. Finally, student teaching requires candidates to demonstrate mastery of INTASC Standard 9 Professional Commitment and Responsibility.

Sample Performance Assessments*:
ED 421: INTASC Assessment #9; lesson reflections
ED 422: INTASC Assessment #9; lesson reflections
ED 423: INTASC Assessment #9; lesson reflections
ED 424: INTASC Assessment #9; lesson reflections
SCI 426: INTASC Assessment #9; lesson reflections
ED 460: Resource folder
ED 470: Book report; web based research project
Student Teaching: Student Teaching evaluations; reflective journals

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit and/or elementary program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

8.9-5c. The program requires the study of collaboration with families-Candidates know the importance of establishing and maintaining a positive collaborative relationship with families to promote the intellectual, social, emotional and physical growth of children. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

In ED 460 Managing the Learning Environment candidates are required to explore and gather resources related to parental collaboration and involvement. In addition, candidates must complete a sample parent letter to accompany their management plan. The elementary "blocks" methods courses (ED 421 Elementary Math Methods; ED 422, Elementary Language Arts Methods; ED 423, Elementary Reading Methods; ED 424, Elementary Social Studies Methods; and, SCI 426, Elementary Science Methods), also require a letter to the parents or guardians of the students in the candidatesí elementary practicum placements. Finally, in student teaching candidates must demonstrate their abilities to collaborate with families to enhance student learning. Student teachers are required to participate in parent teacher conferences during their student teaching placements.

Sample Performance Assessments*:
ED 421: INTASC Assessment #10
ED 422: INTASC Assessment #10; practicum parent letter
ED 423: INTASC Assessment #10; practicum parent letter
ED 424: INTASC Assessment #10; practicum parent letter
SCI 426: INTASC Assessment #10
ED 460: Resource folder
Student Teaching: Student Teaching evaluations; reflective journal

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit and/or elementary program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

8.9-5d. The program requires the study of collaboration with colleagues and the community-Candidates foster relationships with school colleagues and agencies in the larger community to support studentsí learning and well-being. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

In ED 201 candidates begin to develop the knowledge base and skills relevant to this standard. Candidates are actively engaged in making contacts with colleagues and the community through field experiences (the academic and non-academic shadowing experiences). During the elementary "blocks" methods courses (ED 421 Elementary Math Methods; ED 422, Elementary Language Arts Methods; ED 423, Elementary Reading Methods; ED 424, Elementary Social Studies Methods; and, SCI 426, Elementary Science Methods), candidates are expected to work collaboratively with colleagues during the practicum experience. In addition, candidates are required to use community resources in the construction of their integrated units. Finally, in student teaching candidates must demonstrate their skills in collaborating with colleagues as well as the larger community to enhance student learning.

Sample Performance Assessments*:
ED 201: Reflection journal
ED 421: INTASC Assessment #10
ED 422: INTASC Assessment #10; unit plan community references
ED 423: INTASC Assessment #10; unit plan community references
ED 424: INTASC Assessment #10; unit plan community references
SCI 426: INTASC Assessment #10
Student Teaching: Student Teaching evaluations; reflective journals

*An exhaustive list of performance assessments for all courses can be found in course folders in the evidence room. Detailed descriptions of the performance assessments listed above can be found in the course folders as well. Throughout this document "INTASC Assessment #_" refers to the INTASC assessment data collected by the teacher education unit and/or elementary program area. Details of these assessments can be found in the evidence room as well.

8.9.6. The program requires the study of current, appropriate instructional technologies. The program uses varied assessments of candidatesí understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

Throughout their educational program, candidates are exposed and expected to regularly utilize technology in their personal growth. Minot State University has many courses throughout the candidates general education program that expose candidates to the latest educational technology in support of the candidateís learning. As they enter the core courses in Education, we have expectations that the candidate have experience with using technology from the personal perspective (i.e. word processing, email, and browsing the internet). In ED201, students are expected to use this personal level of technology to reflect on and respond to written assignments on historical, social, psychological and/or philosophical issues in education. From this personal level of technology, ED380 (Technology in Teaching) exposes students to the terminology, issues and resources for instructional technologies. ED 380 requires students to demonstrate their knowledge of educational technology terms, reflect and develop positions on the issues in the application of technology within our public schools, and develop examples of many of the instructional technologies such as electronic presentations, multimedia, and digital medias. ED 320 and other courses also offer candidates opportunities to demonstrate their proficiencies in applying current instructional technologies. Of special note for ED 320, ED 421, ED 422, ED 423, ED 424, and ED 470 is these courses application of our electronic teaching stations that include document cameras, internet-enabled Ďcomputer, and VHS/DVD playback through LCD projectors. Beginning Spring 2004, the "block" courses and others apply MSUís mobile computer cart within their instructionals