Skip to content
MSU Teacher Education Unit (TEU)

B.S.Ed. with a major in Business Education

BSE in Business requires 128 hours minimum
*Credits are semester hours

Business

North Dakota State Standards 8.04 (Business Education)

8.4.1 The program requires study of economic systems, business organizations, legal/ethical implications, and entrepreneurship, including global and technological aspects. The program uses a variety of performance assessments of candidatesí understanding and ability to apply that knowledge

Students in the BSE-Business degree program are required to take the following courses to address requirements in this standard:

ACCT 300, Legal Environment of Business: Students complete a series of written examinations in varying formats (multiple choice, short answer, and essay) to assess their knowledge of business legal issues.

BADM 120, Fundamentals of Business: Students describe the role of different functional areas of business and the economy, the processes used by successful business, and the use of key business principles and techniques through written assignments, group discussions, and examinations.

BADM 301, Fundamentals of Management (prereq to BIT 320): Students assess their understanding of the nature and evolution of management thought, strategic management and planning concepts, decision making, creative problem solving, and motivation and leadership through class discussion and reflection, case study analysis, writing projects, and examinations.

BIT 320, Management Information Systems: Students write assessments of business organizations from a socio-technical point of view; they also evaluate and apply five levels of information systems to different organizational levels within the businesses. Students study the Internet, intranets, and extranets; knowledge gained is demonstrated by solving challenge scenarios and case studies where a global and ethical point of view are incorporated. Students also complete a comprehensive project which requires evidence of all MIS concepts.

8.4.2 The program requires study of planning, organizing, and administering a program; business and office technology; computer information systems; workplace skills and career opportunities; and advising a student organization in business. The program uses a variety of performance assessments of candidatesí understanding and ability to apply that knowledge.

Students in the BSE-Business degree program are required to take the following courses to address requirements in this standard:
BIT 320, Management Information Systems: As part of the weekly assignments, students plan, organize, and present a solution to various situations by completing challenge scenarios and case problems relating to information systems. These situations may be domestic, global, and/or entrepreneurial. Students discuss workplace skills in terms of worker responsibilities and how the information system will assist in improving accuracy and efficiency. Challenge scenarios, case studies, and the comprehensive project assess student understanding in these areas.

BIT 385, Technology Management: Students demonstrate their computer hardware knowledge by building a computer component by component, troubleshooting error messages, creating a RFP for a computer system, and completing theory tests based on questions from a A+ test bank.

BIT 391, Methods of Teaching Business: Students develop four units of instruction that include a study guide, worksheet and key, quiz and key, test and key, student project, and an outside information source. Units are then presented to the class in a slide show. Students complete weekly journal entries throughout the semester where they record thoughts and feelings regarding their impending student teaching and their future teaching opportunities.

BIT 421, Philosophy of Vocational Education: Students complete a 30 hour practicum where they observe and participate in entry level instruction in various grades and educational environments. Students plan, organize, and run Technology Day, an annual competition for high school students.

BIT 423, Office Education Supervision and Coordinating Techniques: Students plan offerings for business education programs in schools of varying size. Students plan and organize a cooperative education program.

BOTE 314, Business Reports and Communications: Students practice workplace communication skills by giving oral presentations and by writing various business letters, proposals, and reports.

Students are also required to be members of Phi Beta Lambda prior to admission to Teacher Education.

8.4.3 The program requires study in the various business education areas including accounting and finance, computer and information systems, administrative office procedures, management, marketing, keyboarding, communications, and current technology applications. The program uses a variety of performance assessments of candidatesí understanding and ability to apply that knowledge.

Students in the BSE-Business degree program are required to take the following courses to address requirements in this standard:

ACCT 200, Elements of Accounting I: Student knowledge is assessed through a series of quizzes and examinations.

ACCT 201, Elements of Accounting II: Studentsí knowledge is assessed through a series of quizzes and examinations.

BADM 120, Fundamentals of Business: Students describe the role of different functional areas of business and the economy, the processes used by successful business, and the use of key business principles and techniques through written assignments, group discussions, and examinations.

BIT 235, Internet and the World Wide Web: Students evaluate web pages for design and ease of use. Students develop web pages using web editing software.

BIT 236 Desktop Publishing and Design: Students design brochures, flyers, letterheads, business cards, newsletters, and forms using MS Publisher 2002 and Pagemaker 7.0 application software.

BIT 320, Management Information Systems: Many of the business education areas mentioned in 8.4.3 are covered in the MIS course as the information systems are applied to each functional area of the business. This would include accounting and finance, computer and information systems, administrative office procedures, management, marketing, communications, and current technology applications. Again, this is assessed by requiring challenge scenarios, case studies, and the comprehensive project.

BIT 342 Web Site Design: Students develop web pages and web sites using both editing software and with HTML coding skills.

BIT 385 Technology Management: Students demonstrate their knowledge by building a computer component by component, troubleshooting error messages, creating a RFP for a computer system, and completing theory tests based on questions from a A+ test bank.

BOTE 127, Information Processing: Students demonstrate their word processing knowledge by creating a resume, spreadsheet knowledge by creating a personal budget, and presentation knowledge by creating a power point presentation on the topic of their choice. Final assessments of each software application are also completed.

BOTE 147, Word Processing: Students demonstrate their word processing skills by creating various business documents with varying levels of detailed instruction and time limits.

BOTE 152, Keyboarding II: Students review basic keyboarding skills, format various documents, and are required to meet a predetermined speed/accuracy and production scale.

BOTE 247, Spreadsheet Applications: Students demonstrate their ability to apply the knowledge of spreadsheet concepts to business problems/scenarios by creating a fictitious business. Working through a business plan students demonstrate how spreadsheets are a tool which can be incorporated in the daily business functions such as charts, data tables, scenarios, solver reports, pivot tables, and pivot charts

BOTE 314, Business Reports and Communications: Students demonstrate their oral, written, nonverbal, and listening communication skills through various assignments throughout the semester

*Note: Marketing background is indicated in this standard; however, since licensure for business education in North Dakota does not include marketing, a marketing course is a program requirement. Concepts are covered briefly in other courses

.

8.4.4 The program prepares the teacher education candidate to teach comprehensive business education at the middle level and high school. Teachers are also prepared to assist in keyboarding instruction at the elementary level. Students may also select an area(s) of specialization. The program uses a variety of performance assessments of candidatesí understanding and ability to apply that knowledge

.

Students in the BSE-Business degree program are required to take the following courses to address requirements in this standard:

BIT 391, Methods of Teaching: Students create classroom syllabi for two different courses, along with rule sheets and student questionnaires. Students also prepare four units of instruction in business subjects of their choice.

BIT 421, Philosophy of Vocational Education: Students demonstrate understanding of various issues presented by guest speakers (public school teachers, ND Supervisor of Business and Technical Education, and ND Director of Career and Technical Education) through written reflections. Students visit public schools and attend a meeting of the State Board for Career and Technical Education and reflect in writing on the knowledge gained by these visits. Student complete 30 practicum hours in business education classrooms; such experience varies and often includes observation of elementary and middle school keyboarding.

BIT 423, Office Education Supervision and Coordinating Techniques: Students collaboratively design a computer technology lab for an area school. Students design a cooperative office education plan.

BOTE 127, Information Processing: Students demonstrate: word processing knowledge by creating a resume; spreadsheet knowledge by creating a personal budget; presentation knowledge by creating a powerpoint presentation on the topic of their choice

BOTE 147, Word Processing: Students demonstrate their ability to produce various business documents using word processing software.

BOTE 152, Keyboarding II: Student review basic keyboarding skills, format various documents, and are required to meet a predetermined speed/accuracy and production scale.

8.4.5 The program requires experiences designed to develop knowledge and involvement in business education professional organizations. The program uses a variety of performance assessments of candidatesí understanding and ability to apply that knowledge.

Students in the BSE-Business degree program are required to take the following courses to address requirements in this standard:

BIT 391, Methods of Teaching Business: Students provide a detailed explanation of what business education is and explore the various professional organizations in business education and related fields.

Student membership in NBEA and SNDEA is encouraged. Also, eligible students are invited to join Pi Omega Pi, an honorary business education association. Periodically, students from this group attend the NBEA conference.

8.4.6 The program requires studying the methods of teaching business education. This includes current trends in business education with an examination of a variety of teaching methods and techniques. The program uses a variety of performance assessments of candidatesí understanding and ability to apply that knowledge.

Students in the BSE-Business degree program are required to take BIT 391, Methods of Teaching Business, to address requirements in this standard:

Students observe elementary keyboarding/computer instruction and middle and high school business courses. From this observation, they design classroom procedures and rules, and are able to reflect on the differences among these different age groups and methodology used in instruction.

Students research various lesson plan sites and chose five specific lesson plans for use in the business classroom. A reflective worksheet is then compelted for each plan providing a lesson description, along with the main emphasis and relevancy to the curriculum.

Students select a business subject and research various methods for providing instruction for this subject. Findings are shared in oral or written form with other students so all students are aware of methods used.

Students record ideas about teaching methods in their journals.

8.4.7 The program requires the study of current, appropriate instructional technologies. The program uses a variety of performance assessments of candidatesí understanding and ability to apply that knowledge

Students in the BSE-Business degree program are required to take BIT 391, Methods of Teaching Business, to address requirements in this standard.

Students use a variety of instructional technology both in the methods classroom as they demonstrate their instructional strategies and in the actual classrooms when they complete their practicum hours. Technology used includes application software, computers, viewers, digital and video cameras, and overhead projectors.