A NEWSLETTER FOR EMPLOYEES AND FRIENDS OF MINOT STATE UNIVERSITY » Archived Issues
Jan. 29, 2014
Next Issue: Wednesday, Feb. 12
Submissions Due: noon, Feb. 5
Administration, second floor
Voice: 858-3298 - Fax: 858-4481
linda.benson@minotstateu.edu

Marv Semrau and Maynard SandbergWestlie estate benefits MSU Development Foundation
The Minot State University Development Foundation received a significant gift from the estate of Chuck and Madge Westlie, whose generosity will help the community continue to grow.

“We are fortunate to have had Chuck and Madge Westlie in our lives. Their attitude was: We will always try to do our part,” MSU Development Foundation President Maynard Sandberg said. “They helped so many people and organizations, and through thoughtful planning on their part, their attitude and legacy will go on forever.”

The Westlies were deeply involved in community and regional affairs, supporting a number of foundations and charities through the years.

Madge passed away in January 2010, and Chuck passed on October 2011. To read the full news release, visit www.minotstateu.edu/pio/news/2014/01/westlie-gift.shtml.


Minot State early spring enrollment numbers stable
Minot State University first-day enrollment figures prove to be holding steady. Although enrollment becomes official after the fourth full week of classes, MSU shows initial growth in key areas and a slight decrease in other areas.

The number of out of state and non-Canadian international students has increased from this time last year, which can be attributed in large part to the Grow North Dakota campaign. Grow North Dakota, an MSU endeavor to recruit students, charges a flat tuition rate.

“The increase in the number of out-of-state and non-Canadian international numbers shows we are becoming much more noticeable from outside this region and this is very encouraging,” said David Fuller, MSU president. “We have a very reputable academic program that’s starting to show we are getting noticed.”

Other enrollment gains include the number of transfer students, especially in state transfers, graduate students and full-time undergraduate students and MSU students at Bismarck and Fargo sites. The number of Ward county residents is down slightly. However, MSU continues to draw students from all corners of North Dakota, as the number of students from numerous counties around the state is higher.

MSU enrollment numbers may change, as official enrollment numbers are not reported to the North Dakota University System until after the fourth full week of classes.


Andreasen, Deufel, SherveMinot State University announces three faculty sabbaticals
David Fuller, Minot State University president, recently announced three sabbatical projects. Bethany Andreasen, professor of history, will receive a 50 percent sabbatical leave for the 2014-15 academic year. Margaret Sherve, assistant professor of English, will receive sabbatical leave during fall semester 2014, while Alexandra Deufel, professor of biology, will receive sabbatical leave for spring semester 2015.

Building upon her previous research, Andreasen will conduct comparative archival research on normal schools in the U.S. and Canada. The study's central focus will be to understand the factors underlying the differing development paths of North Dakota normal schools Saskatchewan normal school.

“This sabbatical project will be an important step toward my ultimate production of a monograph that examines a broader sample of American and Canadian normal schools in the northern Great Plains, in order to construct a comparative analysis of the development of teacher training in the two nations,” Andreasen said.

Deufel will prepare a manuscript for submission to the Journal of Morphology, a renowned publication in the field of functional morphology. She will compile and publish her ground-breaking research on burrowing by the Shield-nosed Cobra, Aspidelaps scutatus.

Deufel initially presented her work at the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology, where it was well received. Science magazine covered the symposium and featured her presentation.

Sherve will search for small-press accounts that document the settlement of the Upper Great Plains and create an annotated bibliography of the documents that depict the pioneers’ lives. She plans to conduct research in North Dakota, Montana, Nebraska, Minnesota, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

“My driving goal is to increase the availability of knowledge about individuals and families who settled on the Upper Great Plains before 1915,” Sherve said. “Many of their letters and papers have now been published not only by large, recognized presses but also by hometown newspapers and obscure small presses.”

The objective of MSU’s sabbatical program is to support faculty, professional development and scholarly research. The program contributes in new and powerful ways to students, faculty, the university and Vision 2013. The sabbatical proposals were reviewed and evaluated with three criteria categories: demonstrated teaching excellence, advanced professional development within a faculty member’s discipline and contribution to Vision 2013.


BarnesPianist pays tribute to music Sunday
Paul Barnes, guest pianist, will perform “Homage, a Program of Music Inspired by Music,” Sunday (Feb. 2) in Ann Nicole Nelson Hall at 2 p.m. Barnes is a professor of music at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Barnes has appeared several times at Minot State University in recent years both with the Minot Symphony Orchestra and in solo recital.

Barnes will also lead a masterclass Saturday (Feb. 1) in Nelson Hall, 1-3p.m.. The public is invited to observe this master pedagogue at work with students currently studying piano at Minot State.

All events are free and open to the public. Barnes appears courtesy of a grant from MSU’s Center for Engaged Teaching and Learning. Barnes’ website can be viewed here at www.paulbarnes.net. For more information, contact Anderson at dianna.anderson@minotstateu.edu or 858-3403.


MSU International Film Series continues with ‘Into the Wild’
The 2013-2014 Minot State University International Film Series continues with “Into the Wild" Monday (Feb. 3) in Aleshire Theater at 6:30 p.m.

After graduating from Emory University, top student and athlete Christopher McCandless abandons his possessions, gives his entire savings to charity and hitchhikes to Alaska to live in the wilderness. Along the way in this 2007 American film, he encounters a series of characters who shape his life.

A discussion period will follow the film. There will be a door prize drawing for a gift certificate to an area international restaurant. For questions, contact Scott Sigel, assistant Spanish professor, at 858-4265 or scott.sigel@minotstateu.edu.


Be in the Know sessions enlighten
Be in the Know sessions answer questions about Minot State University departments, policies or procedures. Campus representatives will present short and concise information. Most sessions, unless noted, will be held in Aleshire Theater, 10-10:30 a.m.

• Tuesday (Feb. 4) — “Safety Grant.” Linda Seklecki, Rural Crime and Justice Center project coordinator, will highlight the grant-supported Campus Violence Prevention Program. CVPP aims to educate students, faculty and staff about the prevention of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking on campus.

• Feb. 11 — “Acceptable Use Policy of Your Campus Email Account.” Cathy Horvath, information technology director, will outline basic expectations and appropriate email use to comply with MSU and North Dakota University System policies. MSU’s email graphics standard will also be explained. “Do You Know What Your Employee Perks Are?” Ashley Dhuyvetter and Devin McCall, two Staff Senate members will discuss on- and off-campus perks for MSU faculty and staff.

• Feb. 18 — “Where in the World does Minot State Offer Degree Programs and Courses?” MSU has students in Turkey, China, North Carolina, Utah, Fargo, Bismarck and Minot Air Force Base. With its many delivery options for students, degrees can be earned without coming to the campus. Kris Warmoth, Center for Extended Learning dean, will discuss the expansive outreach offered through CEL.

• March 4 — “Semester at Sea.” While on sabbatical leave in 2013, John Girard, management professor, traveled around the world with the Semester at Sea program. Girard taught management classes, conducted leadership research and visited 15 countries during the 124-day journey. For 75 days, he traveled with Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who was incredibly generous with his time and wisdom.

• March 11 — “Greenhouse Tour” with Alexey Shipunov at 2 p.m. at the south entrance of Cyril Moore Hall. MSU’s greenhouse maintains a wide variety of plants: from exotic succulents and orchids to coffee, tea, chocolate and yerba mate.

• The new NDUS Pathways to Student Success program will be presented when the plan is finalized.

These sessions align with “Vision 2013 strategy three: valuing faculty and staff within an engaged community” and empower the entire campus community to be better MSU marketers. For questions, contact Teresa Loftesnes, director of marketing at 858-3062 or teresa.loftesnes@minotstateu.edu.


Ngugi to discuss ‘America’s Favorite Park: Minot’s Oak Park’
Daniel Ngugi, assistant economics professor, will present “America’s Favorite Park: Minot’s Oak Park” Feb. 5 in Aleshire Theater at 7 p.m. His presentation is part of the Northwest Art Center lecture series.

In summer 2011, Minot residents campaigned in social media to have Oak Park chosen as America’s Favorite Park, earning a $100,000 award from Coca-Cola.

“This campaign and the enthusiasm with which it was conducted demonstrated the great value that people attach to the park,” Ngugi said. 

With the assistance of a Minot State University research grant, Ngugi investigated the economic value that people attach to Oak Park and factors that may influence their opinions. He also examined how often and for what kind of activities people use the park. He will share his findings at the lecture.

A question-and-answer period and informal reception will follow Ngugi’s presentation. All lectures are free and open to the public. For questions, contact nac@minotstateu.edu.


HoffarthHoffarth re-elected staff advisor to the SBHE
Jan. 27, the State Staff Senate re-elected Janice Hoffarth as the staff advisor to the State Board of Higher Education. The Esmond native is an administrative assistant in the University of North Dakota Department of Music.

Hoffarth is the first NDUS staff member to serve in this position, which was created with the passage of HB 1213 by the 2011 Legislative Assembly. She was also the first president of State Staff Senate, which convened in 2008 and represents more than 8,000 full and part-time North Dakota University System staff members. Hoffarth is a non-voting SBHE member and can be contacted at Janice.Hoffarth@ndus.edu.


In the galleries
Jan. 29-Feb. 21 — "Partial Identities,” lithography and mixed media work by Jessica Christy and Ryan Stander, Library Gallery.
Jan. 29-Feb. 27 — “Americas 2014: Paperworks,”Hartnett Gallery.

The “Americas 2014: Paperworks” public reception with juror Mark Browning is Thursday (Jan. 30) in Hartnett Gallery, 6:30 to 8 p.m. A public reception for “Partial Identities” is Feb. 19 in Library Gallery, 6:30 to 8 p.m.


Faculty and staff achievements
The Office of Public Information proudly shares the many accomplishments of faculty and staff with the campus community in every issue.

Michael Linnell, sports information director, was named as one of eight district coordinators for CoSIDA’s (College Sports Information Directors of America) Fred Stabley Sr. Writing Contest. The contest attracts nearly a 1,000 writing submissions yearly from across the country.

Frank Moseley, finance professor and energy economics and finance program director, was interviewed by POLITIKEN, a Danish newspaper, about oil activity in western North Dakota. His interview was featured in the December issue.


Minot State University Mission
Minot State University is first and foremost dedicated to the success of all students: their growth and development as educated citizens, their confidence, and their life-long devotion to the common good and the welfare of others.