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Center for Engaged Teaching and Learning (CETL)

FIRST-YEAR EXPERIENCE

» First Year Experience

FALL 2015 LEARNING COMMUNITY DESCRIPTIONS & CONNECTED COURSES

DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC LEARNING COMMUNITIES

LEARNING COMMUNITIES OPEN TO ALL FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS

#1  Minutia: Scope it out!
Does the Five second rule really apply to dropped food? This course will address the questions you have about microbes in a fun and informative way. Explore strategies for successful transition to the university community as you embark on your educational journey. How do you balance all the little things to stay healthy, happy, fit, and safe?
UNIV 110: (2 cr.) R 1 - 2:50 Okeson
BIOL 142: (4 cr.) MWF 2 - 2:50 Lepp
BIOL 142L: T 1 - 2:50 Lepp

#2  Music Student Survival Guide
The aim of this learning community is to address topics pertinent to music students in their first year of study. Through reading, discussion, and projects targeted on the following topics, students will learn not only to survive the pressures of being a music student, but to thrive in the music school environment, incubating the skills needed for a successful life in music.
    The Practice Room: Practicing effectively, building musicianship, preventing injury, and instrument/voice care
    The Rehearsal Room: Functioning effectively as a member of an ensemble, developing leadership skills, rehearsal
    etiquette
    The Concert Hall: Preparing to perform, dealing with performance anxiety, concert hall etiquette
    The Musical World: Current events in the music world, careers in music, preparing professional promotional materials,
    building a musical network, engaging in the community through music.
UNIV 110: (2 cr.) WF 10 - 10:50 D. Anderson
MUSC 123: (1 cr.) MWF 9 - 9:50 E. Anderson
"Orchestra, Band, Choir" (1 cr.) (need to register independently for this course)

#3   So…You want to be a Techie
(Recommended for Computer Science majors)
In this FYE you will explore what it means and takes to be a cyber (computer) professional in the 21st Century. Through hands-on experiences, you will explore and learn foundational concepts and skills regarding hardware and software (applications and operating systems) which are needed to succeed in the profession. You will also learn how to write code which is the foundation of getting cyber technology hardware to work.
UNIV 110: (2 cr.) TR 8 - 8:50 Hayton
CSCI 297: (3 cr.) MWF 8-8:50 Hayton
CSCI 111: (4 cr.) MTWR 9 - 9:50 OR
CSCI 160: (4 cr.) MTWR 1 - 1:50 Hayton


#4  Explore Expand Express Yourself
(Open ONLY to International Students)

This Learning Community is designed to help International Students have a positive transition to Minot State University. Students will be encouraged to "explore" their new environment and take advantage of being in a new place, to "expand" their perspectives through an introspective awareness of a new culture, and to "express" themselves through art, literature and public speaking techniques.
UNIV 110: (2 cr.) TR 1 - 1:50 Clearebout
ART 110: (3 cr.) TR 2 - 3:15 Donovan
COMM 110: (3 cr.) TR 11 - 12:15 Pearson

#5 Great Minds Think Alike. Or Do They?
(Recommended for students in Teacher Education)
This group of courses will explore the connections between classroom practices and the processes of learning. Why do some students remember pictures and others remember words? Is it useful to label students? Why are some students motivated and others not so much? Does development affect learning? How can educators help students be successful? We will explore these questions through coursework that looks at the complicated decisions that adults and kids in schools make every day and then visit elementary, middle and high schools to apply the information.
UNIV 110: (2 cr.) T 1 - 2:50 Hintz
ED 260: (2 cr.) R 1 - 2:50 TBD
PSY 111: (3 cr.) MWF 9 - 9:50 Olson

#6 Great Minds Think Alike. Or Do They?
(Recommended for students in Teacher Education)
This group of courses will explore the connections between classroom practices and the processes of learning. Why do some students remember pictures and others remember words? Is it useful to label students? Why are some students motivated and others not so much? Does development affect learning? How can educators help students be successful? We will explore these questions through coursework that looks at the complicated decisions that adults and kids in schools make every day and then visit elementary, middle and high schools to apply the information.
UNIV 110: (2 cr.) R 1 - 2:50 Hintz
ED 260: (2 cr.) T 1 - 2:50 TBD
PSY 111: (3 cr.) MWF 9 - 9:50 Olson

#7 Superhero Delusion: Where is the Justice in the American Dream?
How do you connect the dots between justice and mercy?  What does it mean to be a good citizen?  Do you have to be a modern day superhero to not fail?  What is your American Dream?  What do you know about the Bill of Rights? How does crime and perceptions of crime impact your American Dream?  What do you know about due process?  Does the media and popular culture direct all the answers to these questions?   This cohort of classes will look at pop culture artifacts ranging from war propaganda to religious freedom to superhero's; from Shakespeare to Sherlock Holmes; from “Dirty Harry” to “The Departed;” from the Beatles to.....well Bieber!
UNIV 110: (2 cr.) MW 12 - 12:50 Neuharth
COMM 110: (3 cr.) MWF 11 - 11:50 Watson
CJ 201: (3 cr.) TR 11 - 12:15 Spelchen

#8 To Play or Not to Play? The Psychology of Injury
(Recommended for Physical Education Majors, Coorporate Fitness Majors and Athletic Training majors)
Broken bones, concussions, sprains, and pulled muscles - commonplace in the sporting realm! Who determines when an athlete can get back on the court or field:coaches, players, or professional athletic trainers? In the wild world of sports, when does "mind over matter" really apply? This learning community will explore the psychology of sport and injury, as well as the ethics of playing when injured. If you like sport and want to know whether or not athletes play with concussions, bruised muscles or injured egos, this is the learning community for you.
UNIV 110: (3 cr.) MWF 12 - 12:50 Odahlen
BIOL 220: (4 cr.) MWF 3 - 3:50 Shabani
BIOL 220L: M 10 - 11:50 Shabani
HPER 210: (2 cr.) TR 9 - 9:50 Martinson

#9 What's Math Got to do With it?
Math is everywhere! Its influence is felt every time you listen to music or view art or architecture. Its power is experienced every time you use your phone or your computer. Its value is inherent to every business, industry, and government. Yet many people are unaware of how mathematics and mathematical thinking play into their everyday lives. This learning community will explore the ways in which mathematics is used in society and how it supports activities in which we participate and careers we choose to enter. Students will also look at what math really is… and what it is not!
UNIV 110: (2 cr.) TR 10 - 10:50 Nielsen
ENGL 110: (3 cr.) TR 11 - 12:15 Sherve
MATH 210: (4 cr.) MTWR 9 - 9:50 Morris

#10 Take Me Out to the Ballgame
Sport has always been a vital part of the human experience. Yet only in relatively recent times has it developed into a massive commercial enterprise that inspires loyalties not only within a region, but at a national and international level. While sports are, at their core, games, they are also much more. Sports meet certain needs of modern society and are inextricably tied into the behavior, values, and culture of the people who support them. Looking through the prisms of history, sociology, and philosophy, we will examine the interactions between modern sports and issues including politics, race, gender, and social class in the American experience from the late nineteenth century to the present.
UNIV 110: (2 cr.) MW 12:12:50 Andreasen
SOC 110: (3 cr.) MWF 10 - 10:50 Eddie
PHIL 101: (3 cr.) MWF 9 - 9:50 Kelly
#11 This is Your Life: Telling Stories and Making Sense of the World
Explore your life and the greater world through stories of the past and present as you build narratives from your own life and uncover new storeis from the lives of others to be preserved digitally. This FYE will duscuss the relevance and necessity of stories in the formation of a culture and its identity and will help you discover what you know, what you don't know, and what you don't know you don't know.
UNIV 110: (2 cr.) MW 11 - 11:50 Thoms-Arens
ENGL 110: (3 cr.) MWF 10 - 10:50 Aleshire
SOC 110: (3 cr.) MWF 1 - 1:50 Larshus
#12 History Science Theater

In this FYE we will study the strange and mysterious places where history and science intersect.  How do the facts of science and history get translated into the “theaters” of popular imagination?  Could Godzilla happen? Why did explorers expect to find sea monsters? We will examine popular historical texts and cultural images, sci-fi films, and historical documentaries to learn how scientists and historians construct critical and persuasive understanding of science and the past.  The course will include written and multimedia work as well as a final project showcase.  Students in History Science Theater will be given use of an iPad with apps, texts, and materials to support all three courses in the FYE.
UNIV 110: (2 cr.) R 1 - 2:50 Ringrose
HIST 212: (3 cr.) TR 9:30 - 10:45 Ringrose
BIOL 151: (4 cr.) MWF 11 - 11:50 Deufel
BIOL 151L: T 1-3 Ihli

#13 Cycling Through Geology and Chemistry

This course will apply basic principles of geology and chemistry while exploring interactions of these two disciplines through the study of select geochemical (or biogeochemical) cycles. We will study geochemical cycles such as the carbon cycle, nitrogen cycle, and water cycle. The cycles will also be related to topics of environmental interest, such as acid rain, ozone depletion, soil nutrients, and climate change.
UNIV 110: (2 cr.) T 2 - 3:50 Webster
GEOL 105: (4 cr.) MF 9 - 10:15 Collette
GEOL 105L: W 9 - 10:50 Collette
CHEM 121: (5 cr.) MWF 2 - 2:50 Crackel
CHEM 121 Recitation: T 1 - 1:50 Crackel
CHEM 121L: R 2 - 4:50 Winburn

#14 Trivial Crossroads

This FYE community, allows us to see that we are at the crossroads of the contemporary globalized world, a world that is increasingly interconnected but yet less understood. You were born into an online world that allows to travel practically anywhere and interact with people everywhere. These three classes will each highlight some aspects of this exciting time to be alive but will also come together to form a fun adventure of learning, where you will be constantly engaged in meaningful activities that emerge from exploring crossroads of technology and place.  
UNIV 110: (3 cr.) MWF 10 - 10:50 Reynolds
GEOG 267: (3 cr.) MWF 2 - 2:50 Sowers
BIT 123: (2 cr.) MW 8 - 8:50 Seymour

#15 Balancing Instinct

For many the habits and professional skills developed in college will set the tone for life after college. Therein lies the quandary of figuring out how to juggle, communicate and set positive life practices. Are you looking to start your college experience off on a positive note? Then, join us as we practice learning to ask the right questions, develop healthy habits and communicate outside our boundaries.
UNIV 110: (2 cr.) TR 9 - 9:50 Standar
HPER 126: (1 cr.) MW 2 - 2:50 Eckmann

#16 Muddy Waters
This First-Year Experience will focus on sustainability for the Earth and the impact of over-consumption on the planet, our communities, and our health. Students will choose an area of sustainability that is close to their heart, research those needs on our campus and community, and implement a plan of action to help take care of the problem, so this Earth will be livable for future generations.
UNIV 110: (2 cr.) F 2 - 3:50 Gilseth
CHEM 127: (4 cr.) MWF 10 - 10:50 Clayton
CHEM 127L: F 12 - 1:50 Clayton
ART 250: (3 cr.) MW 1 - 3:50 Olson

                     SPRING 2016 LEARNING COMMUNITY DESCRIPTIONS & CONNECTED COURSES
                                            DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC LEARNING COMMUNITIES
                                 LEARNING COMMUNITIES OPEN TO ALL FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS
#17 Speak Up and Branch Out
(Recommended for Communication Disorders majors)
Just as a tree has many branches, communication disorders, too, has many branches. Which branch will you choose? Are you out on a limb? Afraid to speak up? Explore the various branches of communication disorders, discover the opportunities to merge public speaking skills with community outreach, and prepare to plant your future on solid ground.
UNIV 110: (2 cr.) MW 2 - 2:50 Harmon
CD 150: (2 cr.) TR 2 - 2:50 Holt

#18 Minutia: Scope it out!
Does the five second rule really apply to dropped food? Should you wear flip-flops in the shower?  This course will address microbiology concepts as they relate to health science in a fun and informative way. Explore strategies for successful transition to the university community as you embark on your educational journey.
UNIV 110: (2 cr.) R 1:00 - 2:50 Okeson
BIOL 142: (4 cr.) MWF 2:00 - 2:50 Lepp
BIOL 142 Lab: R 10:00 - 11:50 Lepp

#19 Urban Legends
Urban legends have a way of getting into our heads, and often change our behavior. How many of them have a basis in fact? What are the origins of urban legends and why are they so compelling? This FYE looks at urban legends by first learning about cultures through Geography 161: World Regional Geography and Communications 110: Fundamentals of Public Speaking—thereby providing us with the tools to search for truth. Through the INT we will call into question what we have traditionally learned, analyzing these fascinating legends using an academic folklore approach. In this class, you will be expected to question preconceived notions at every turn.

UNIV110: (2 cr.) TR 1:00 - 1:50 Sund
GEOG 161: (3 cr.) TR 11:00 - 12:15 Sowers
COMM 110: (3 cr.) MWF 10:00 – 10:50 Gilseth

#20  Will Spanish Rule the World?
Enriching your understanding of the Spanish speaking world will be very valuable as you embark on your studies.  This course will enhance students understanding of culture, history, and language of the Spanish speaking world.  Attention will focus on historical events, contemporary geopolitical issues, and the humanities as it relates to Europe and the Americas.
UNIV110: (2 cr.)  M 2:00 – 3:50 Mondon
SPAN 120: (3 cr.) MWF 11:00 – 11:50 Cristofaro
HIST 212: (3 cr.)  TR 12:30-1:45 Pijning                    

#21 Stop Wondering and Start Making!
“Imagination is more important than knowledge.” - Albert Einstein.  Explore creativity, imagination, and artistic expression without judgment. Write poetry, stories, a screenplay, or music. Make art of any kind. Invent a new gadget. Perform stand-up or give a theatrical performance. Throw out preconceived notions about research papers and explore the intersections between creativity and academic writing. Also explore the creative work of others—musicians, artists, writers, singers, funny people, innovators, inventors, and more. Textbooks include anything from comics to YouTube videos, and field trips will be considered. The class will culminate with a celebration of its creativity.
UNIV 110: (3 cr.) MWF  1:00 - 1:50 Geller and Watson
ENGL 120: (3 cr.) MWF 11:00 - 11:50 Aleshire

#22  Great Minds Think Alike. Or Do They?
(Recommended for students in Teacher Education)
This group of courses will explore the connections between classroom practices and the processes of learning. Why do some students remember pictures and others remember words? Is it useful to label students? Why are some students motivated and others not so much? Does development affect learning? How can educators help students be successful? We will explore these questions through coursework that looks at the complicated decisions that adults and kids in schools make every day and then visit elementary, middle and high schools to apply the information.
UNIV 110: (2 cr.) T 1:00 - 2:50 Hintz
ED 260: (2 cr.) R 1:00 - 2:50 TBD
PSY 111: (3 cr.) MWF 11:00 – 11:50 Olson