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Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions R - U

Science
Social Science
Social Work
Sociology
Spanish
Special Education
Studies in Community and Environment
Theatre

Science

SCI 102 Introduction to Radiologic Technology 1 cr. Designed to acquaint first-year student (freshman) radiologic technology students with the depth and breadth of this field. Students visit the radiology department of a local hospital. The course is presented by the education coordinator of a local school of radiologic technology. Lecture, 1 hour. Grading Basis: S/U.

SCI 240 Research Methods 2 cr. This course will introduce students to library skills, computer skills, and communication skills used to plan and carry out research projects. Students will search for, read, and discuss journal articles; write and edit project proposals; and learn basic data management and analysis skills. Pre-requisite: sophomore, junior or senior status.

SCI 301 Biogeochemical Cycles 3 cr. A broad overview of global biogeochemical processes, including the origin of elements; Earth evolution, evolution of biogeochemical cycles, biogeochemical cycles of major elements such as carbon, notrogen, phosphorous, and sulfur, cycles of select trace elements, interactions of biogeochemical cycles, biogeochemistry of various ecosystems, and environmental biogeochemistry. Lecture, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 127, CHEM 127, GEOL 127.

SCI 391 Teaching Science in the Secondary School 3 cr. Study of science teaching in middle school and high school grades with emphasis on clinical experience. Basic techniques for all disciplines are individualized in practice. Emphasis on teaching an investigative approach to science. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education.

SCI 405 Radiologic Technology Clinical 60 cr. Students spend 24 months in a hospital environment. Education includes both didactic and clinical studies. Restricted to students who have been admitted to the Radiologic Technology degree program. Credit may be repeated for a total of # credits. Grading Basis: S/U

SCI 426 Elementary Science Methods 4 cr. Study of basic concepts of science within a framework of elementary school teaching methodology. Interpretation of science content, learning theory, curriculum approaches, instructional strategies, and lesson planning are emphasized. Includes extensive clinical experience. Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education and Ed 320. Corequisites: ED 320, 421, 422, 423, 424.

SCI 480 Seminar 2 cr. Students present and discuss original student research projects in science. Prerequisite(s): SCI 240, senior status, permission of instructors.

Social Science

SS 283 Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in America 3 cr. (Diversity) This course examines the historical development of American ethnic and cultural diversity, including Native American, and places that diversity in global perspective. This course meets the Education Standards and Practices Board (ESPB) Native American Studies requirement for teacher certification.

SS 391 Secondary History/Social Science Teaching Methods 3 cr. A methods course designed for those intending to teach history and social studies at the secondary level. The course includes a study of classroom techniques, a microteaching experience, and a practicum in a secondary level social classroom. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education. (Offered fall semester only.)

SS 398 Secondary History/Social Science Practicum 1 cr. This course is designed to give History and Social Science education majors an opportunity to have thirty hours of practical experience. Placements in school settings are arranged by the Teacher Advisement and Field Placement Office. Co-requisites: SS 391. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education, SS 391 or departmental approval, and History Education and Social Science Education majors.

SS 399 Readings in Social Science 1-3 cr. Study and discussion of readings in social science, particularly those which cross disciplinary lines. Repeatable for credit.

Social Work

SWK 250 Interpersonal Skills 3 cr. Verbal and nonverbal interpersonal skills relating to common interaction as well as those interactions generic to planned changed processes of generalist social work practice. This course requires 50 hours of concurrent interpersonal skills building. Experience in the community in which social workers will be employed.

SWK 256 Development of Social Welfare 3 cr. (GE7-Diversity) Overview and history of social welfare and social work, including fields of practice and populations served, social work philosophy, and socio-political-economic conditions which influence social welfare services.

SWK 285 Child Wlefare In Rural Comm 3 cr. This course will examine the basic core of child welfare services: Services to protect children from neglect and abuse, family preservation services, foster care, adoption, and child advocacy. Additionally, it will examine the legal framework that governs the affairs of children.

SWK 330 Behavior in Pluralistic Society 3 cr. The underlying theoretical perspectives of sociological, psychological, biological, and spiritual systems relative to human growth and development from birth to death with emphasis on ethnic, racial, and cultural diversity characteristic of American pluralism. Prerequisite(s): SWK 250, SOC 110, and PSY 111.

SWK 331 Systems Theory and Family Dynamics 3 cr. The underlying theoretical perspectives of the systems model, with application to individuals, families, groups, and communities within the larger context. Assessment and problem solving techniques with families of all types in the context of generalist practices.

SWK 335 Social Work Methods I 3 cr. Problem solving, assessment, and application of interventive techniques with individuals in the context of generalist practice. Admittance to the social work program.

SWK 340 Social Welfare Policy 3 cr. A generalist practice framework is used for the analysis of social welfare policies and current policy structures and policy practice, advocacy, and evaluation used in agency, community, and legislative settings.

SWK 350 Rural Social Work Practice 3 cr. Study and evaluation of rural, regional social services and delivery systems, characteristics of rural populations and community analysis, function and roles of social worker in a nonmetro-politan environment. Prerequisite: SWK 250, 255 and 256.

SWK 379 Aging Practice and Policies 3 cr. Study of social welfare policies which sanction and direct services and welfare for the elderly.

SWK 401 Contemporary Issues with Native American Families 3 cr. This course will survey contemporary issues that Native American families face in today's society and how these influences effect the context of family life and the helping process.

SWK 402 N.A. Children & Adolescents 3 cr. This course will survey contemporary issues that Native American children and adolescents experience in today's society and how these issues affect their family life and issues related to delivery of services.

SWK 426 Social Work Methods II 3 cr. Problem solving, assessment, and application of interventive techniques with small groups in the context of generalist practice. Prerequisite(s): SWK 335, 340 and admission to Social Work program.

SWK 427 Social Work Methods III 3 cr. Problem solving, assessment, and application of interventive techniques with communities, disciplinary boards, and organizations in the context of generalist practice. Prerequisite(s): SWK 335, 340, and admission to Social Work program.

SWK 428 Crisis Intervention 3 cr. This course introduces students to the theory and practice of crisis intervention with emphasis on the use of short-term intervention and problem-solving techniques. This course emphasizes crisis theory and crisis intervention models applied to various crisis problems and populations at risk.

SWK 432 Field Education 11 cr. Structured and educationally directed learning experiences in public and private human service agencies. Grading Basis: S/U. Prerequisite(s): SWK 426, 427 and admission to Social Work program. Corequisites: SWK 433, 434, 491.

SWK 442 Research Methods in Social Work 3 cr. This course introduces students to the concepts and principles of social work research methodology. This course includes conceptualizing a social work problem, designing research strategy, making use of relevant literature, and organizing and evaluating relevant data. Prerequisite(s): MATH 240, or PSY 241

SWK 491 Senior Seminar 3 cr. Seminar during field education that integrates social work knowledge, values, skills, and ethics. Corequisite: SWK 432.

Sociology

SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology 3 cr. (GE7-Diversity) An introduction to the basic insights, concepts, theories and methods of the discipline. The course encourages students to think critically, to apply sociological knowledge, and to develop a global perspective. Topics for discussion include culture, social interaction, deviance, sexuality, stratification, race relations, gender, family, economics, politics, technology and social change. SOC 110 is a Prerequisite(s) for all 300 and 400 level SOC courses.

SOC 200H Idea of Society 3 cr. (GE7-Diversity) The idea of society is perhaps one of the most difficult abstractions in our repertoire. This course introduces the student to various perspectives that seek to explain both the historical and contemporary meaning of society. Honors Program admission or 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of the instructor is required.

SOC 201 Social Problems 3 cr. (Diversity) A sociological analysis of major social problems.

SOC 210 Introduction to Anthropology 3 cr. (GE7-Diversity) Examination of customs, institutions, and social organization of preliterate societies. Brief consideration of physical and biological aspects of human development.

SOC 252 Criminology 3 cr. Study of criminal behavior, including the nature and causes of crime, and of official responses to criminal law violations. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 255 Changing American Family 3 cr. An introduction to diverse family issues and concerns in American society. The course examines the changing functions, patterns and structures of the family as a major social institution. Topics include changing patterns of dating, mate selection, cohabitation, marriage, dual career families, adoption, divorce and remarriage.

SOC 269 Culture and Sexuality 3 cr. This course will examine ethical, cultural, psychological, social, and political issues related to sexual relationships and sexual behavior. Specific issues covered include sexual consent and sexual responsibility; harassment and freedom of speech; privacy; censorship and pornography; impact of media on sexual relationships; and university and governmental regulation of intimate relationships, such as interracial relationships and student-professor relationship. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 or SOC 200H

SOC 275 Contemporary Community Issues 3 cr. This course is designed to develop your understanding of the different communities you are a member of and the issues facing them in the 21st century. Drawing on theories and concepts from various disciplines, we will expand on how communities and the issues associated with them are defined, constructed and addressed at multiple levels of society. Specifically, we will examine various political and social issues facing our communities including but not limited to: crime, ecology, inequalities, health care and the family. We will also set those issues in their larger state, national and global context, address the impact of that context and the proposed possible outcomes for the future.

SOC 278 Social Research Methods 3 cr. Study of the basic methods of empirical social science research. Topics include techniques and theory of research design, formulating and testing hypotheses, measurements, sampling, modes of observation, data management, and elementary data analysis.

SOC 280 Social Movements & Human Right 3 cr. (Diversity) This course examines the complex relationship between social movements and human rights. Primary emphasis will be given to how grassroot movements/mobilizations have both shaped and contested our modern conceptions and practices of human rights in the US and globally. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 or SOC 200H

SOC 299 Special Topics in Sociology 1-8 cr. These are flexible courses that may be taught depending on student needs. The design of the course is to present the student an opportunity to concentrate on various topics. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

SOC 325 Environmental Sociology 3 cr. This course examines the interrelationship between our community, culture, society and the global environment. Students will become engaged in diverse environmental projects, discussions and debates on eco-feminism, bio-diversity, bio-piracy, environmental degradation and future sustainability. Students will complete a final project that provides suggestions, recommendations and solutions to environmental preservation in the future.

SOC 357 Sociology of Religion 3 cr. A sociological analysis of religious belief, behavior, organization, and the relation between religion as an institution and the larger society of which it is a part. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 361 Comparative Ethnic Studies 3 cr. Examination of the social, political, legal, and economic development of ethnic inequality in our American society. Topics include prejudice and discrimination, majority ,and minority relations, institutionalized racism, intergroup contacts, migration, immigration, affirmative action, and equal opportunity programs. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 363 Sociology of Gender 3 cr. (Diversity) This course focuses on the social, political, legal, and economic dimensions of contemporary women's issues. Topics include the feminization of poverty, reproductive technology, single parenthood, childcare policies, aggression against women, and institutionalized sexism. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 369 Studies in Deviance 3 cr. This course examines how so-called deviant identities, communities, desires, and practices are socially, historically, and culturally constructed. Particular emphasis is placed on non-traditional forms of deviancy. Discussion topics include transgender issues, queer theory, body modification, religious fanaticism, and militia groups. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 374 Cultural Studies 3 cr. (Diversity)This course provides students with a basic understanding of the dynamics of culture and its impact on global change. Areas covered include: institutional structures of culture, cultural history and legacies, production and distribution of culture, effects of culture on meaning and social action. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 375 Social Change and Development 3 cr. Designed to familiarize students with the theories, methods, and analytical frameworks for understanding social change and development in a global context. Topics covered include gender and race/ethnicity issues, social movements, and collective behavior, economic development, and globalization. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 and three credits of Sociology.

SOC 376 Social Psychology 3 cr. Study of the social sources and patterns of perception, attribution, socialization, and interpersonal interaction. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 399 Senior Readings 1-6 cr. Intended for students close to completing their major/minor sociology requirements. This course provides a forum for students to test the knowledge and skills they have acquired throughout their course of study by re-examining specific issues pertinent to sociology. Topics to be discussed range from civic, political, and religious participation through race, ethnicity, and gender issues. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 or SOC 200H.

SOC 401 Research/Practicum/Internship 1-6 cr. The course allows students the option of developing a major paper involving a literature review or empirical research or placement in the applied setting for practical experience. Community and/or campus settings are available. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 or Soc 200h.

SOC 420 Drugs & Society 3 cr. An examination of public policy and the social construction of drugs and drug use. Includes the history of drug legislation, the interactional experiences of drug users, harm reduction and rehabilitation vs. criminalization, social effects, drug culture, and legalization debates. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 or SOC 200H

SOC 451 Political Sociology 3 cr. Examines the relationship between society and politics through an analysis of the intersection of economic development, social relations, and the political sphere. Employing an international perspective, the course examines how race, ethnicity, and gender interact with political culture, ideology, and the state. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 and three credits of Sociology.

SOC 476 Theory Construction & App 3 cr. Course is based on a basic understanding of the properties, limitations, and applications of theory is important not only to producers of sociological knowledge but also as consumers of that knowledge. The goal of the class is develop an understanding of sociological theory by exploring some of the basic theoretical orientations sociologists use in studying social phenomena and some of the specific theories based on these orientations. By considering criteria appropriate for evaluating these orientations and the theories developed from them. And exploring the different ways that a sociological theory may and may not be used in resolving social problems. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 or SOC 200H.

SOC 477 Sociological Theory 3 cr. This course introduces students to the major nineteenth and twentieth century thinkers who shaped the development of sociological thought. In exploring the theoretical heritage of sociology, the course seeks to develop an appreciation of what theory is and how necessary and useful it is for examining and understanding the social world. A major assumption of the course is that sociological theory has an eminently practical function for understanding ourselves and the world we live in. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 or SOC 200H and SOC 476.

SOC 499 Special Topics in Sociology 1-8 cr. These are flexible courses that may be taught depending on student needs. The design of the course is to present the student an opportunity to concentrate on various topics. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

Spanish

SPAN 101 Beginning Spanish I 4 cr. (GE3) For beginners or those entering with one or two years of high school Spanish. Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture.

SPAN 102 Beginning Spanish II 4 cr. (GE3) A continuation of Beginning Spanish I. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 101.

SPAN 194 Independent Study 1-3 cr. Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of Spanish. Spanish majors or minors only.

SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I 4 cr. (GE3) Review of basic Spanish with increased practice in conversation, reading, and writing. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 102, three years of high school Spanish, or consent of instructor.

SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II 4 cr. (GE3) Continuation of SPAN 201. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 201.

SPAN 220 Hispanic Cinema 3 cr. An exploration of socio-cultural, historical, and political issues in non-mainstream Hispanic cinema. Supplementary readings in English translation. Films projected in Spanish, with English subtitles. Taught in English.

SPAN 299 Special Topics 3 cr. Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of Hispanic language, literature, culture, and civilization. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

SPAN 340 Conversation & Composition I 3 cr. Advanced practice in oral and written skills using cultural readings and other media. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 202 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 341 Conversation & Composition II 3 cr. Advanced practice in oral skills using cultural readings and other media. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 202 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 342 Introduction to Hispanic Literature 3 cr. Designed to improve language skills with an emphasis on reading and to enhance the student's ability to understand literature. Includes study of poetry, drama, and narrative from the Spanish speaking world. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 341 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 343 Hispanic Culture 3 cr. Readings in culture and society of the Spanish speaking world. Prerequisite: SPAN 341 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 394 Independent Study 1-3 cr. Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of Spanish. Spanish majors or minors only.

SPAN 395 Service Learning 3 cr. Students will utilize reflection and research (both primary and secondary) to integrate (a) personal community or global service experience(s). Spanish majors or minors only.

SPAN 399 Special Topics 1-3 cr. Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of Spanish. Spanish majors or minors only. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

SPAN 441 Hispanic Literature 3 cr. Survey of the literature of the Spanish speaking world. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 342 or consent of instructor

SPAN 450 Senior Capstone Project in Spanish 3 cr. Individual research project on a cultural topic approved by the instructor one semester prior to enrollment in the course. Course restricted to majors.

SPAN 496 Study Tour 1-6 cr. MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit. May count towards the Spanish or Spanish Education major or minor.

Special Education

SPED 101 Introduction to IDD 3 cr. (Diversity) A survey of the various types of developmental disabilities, the philosophy of service, team planning, individual program planning, and legal and ethical considerations for persons with developmental disabilities.

SPED 110 Introduction to Exceptional Children 3 cr. (Diversity) A survey course examining exceptionalities of learning with a focus on understanding current social and educational responsibilities.

SPED 111 Health Care in IDD I 3 cr. This course concentrates on basic medication concepts and procedures, First Aid, CPR, staff responsibilities for medications and health issues, nutrition information, and issues in sexuality.

SPED 112 Health Care in IDD II 2 cr. This course focuses on the most common types of seizures and provides information on how to observe, report, and assist persons during seizures. Included also are techniques of positioning, turning, and transferring persons with physical disabilities.

SPED 113 American Sign Language I 3 cr. (GE3) This course is designed to introduce students to American Sign Language and its community of users. Students will develop basic vocabulary and conversational skills.

SPED 115 American Sign Language II 3 cr. (GE3) This course is designed to continue where ASL I ended. Students will expand vocabulary and conversational skills. Deaf culture will be further emphasized in this course through expanded contact with the deaf community. Prerequisite(s): SPED 113.

SPED 117 Manually Coded English I 3 cr. An introduction to Signing Exact English and finger spelling. A basic sign vocabulary is presented.

SPED 120 Intro to Positive Beh Supports 3 cr. This course focuses on principles of behavior; basic behavior management procedures; defining, recording, and charting behavior; and ways to design and implement behavior management programs. It also teaches skills on how to write behavioral objectives.

SPED 130 Expanding Leisure Opts IDD I 1 cr. This course focuses on basic concepts and ways to assess recreation and leisure competencies. It provides information on leisure time activities and associated community resources for persons with developmental disabilities.

SPED 140 Human Development 2 cr. A study of the sequence of human development from conception to late childhood, adolescence through adulthood, with emphasis on motor, language, cognitive, emotional, and social characteristics.

SPED 210 Intro to Ed of Children w/DHH 3 cr. A foundations course which surveys the history of the education of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. An introduction to present techniques as well as historical philosophies is presented. Prerequisite(s) SPED 110.

SPED 213 American Sign Language III 3 cr. Continued study of American Sign Language. Additional language functions, grammar structure, cultural behaviors and conversational strategies. Prerequisite(s) SPED 115.

SPED 217 Manually Coded English II 2 cr.

SPED 221 Promoting Personal Outcomes 2 cr. This course introduces a value-based process for developing and evaluating major program goals for clients, the relationship of assessment to goal setting, and strategies for achieving goals and objectives.

SPED 223 I/DD and Mental Health Disorders 1 cr. An overview of issues related to supporting people who experience both intellectual disabilities and mental health disorders including common psychopathological disorders, identification of the need for services, treatment options, and standards for service provision.

SPED 225 Assisting People with TBI 2 cr. This course provides a comprehensive overview of Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) and how to assist people with TBI and their families. It discusses community resources, assessment issues and strategies, as well as the role of employment consultants in working with people with TBI.

SPED 234H Disability and Society 3 cr. (GE4-Diversity) This course prepares future leaders to understand new perspectives on viewing disability as a part of a diverse society. Learning experiences are designed to eliminate myths and preconceptions and prepare students to successfully encounter diversity as expressed by people with disabilities who may be colleagues, employees, neighbors, or members of the community. Honors Program admission or 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of the instructor is required.

SPED 250 Dev Communicative Interactions 2 cr. This course is designed to provide training to personnel who work with persons who exhibit severe disorders and deficiencies. It is a multimedia training program in the area of social interaction, communication and language skills development, and intervention.

SPED 255 Aging and IDD 2 cr. This course is designed to address training needs of direct service delivery and case management personnel working with aging/aged persons with developmental disabilities in community programs. It covers demographic and philosophical considerations, health, social and legal issues, and coordination of services.

SPED 296 Field Experience in IDD 4 cr. Practical experience in the development of individual program plans; administration, documentation, and storage of medications; positioning, turning, and transferring techniques; and observation, assistance and documentation of seizure activities.

SPED 298 Experience in the Classroom 1 cr. Classroom experience designed to acquaint the student with exceptional children.

SPED 301 Language Analysis of the DHH 3 cr. Strategies for teaching grammatical structures and the rules of language usage to children with hearing impairments. Prerequisite(s): SPED 210.

SPED 310 Introduction to IDDA 3 cr. A survey course in the education of persons with developmental disabilities including handicapping conditions, legal aspects, history, parental perspectives, educational programming, service delivery systems, and current research. Prerequisite(s): SPED 110.

SPED 340 Classroom Assessment for IDDA 3 cr. The use of various tests for educational programming, instructional objectives, class structure, task analysis, behavior modification, and contingency management. Prerequisite(s): SPED 310

SPED 379 Leadership in SPED 1-2 cr. Individualized class designed to provide instruction in leadership processes for professional organizations in special education. Prerequisite(s): Instructor approval.

SPED 402 Language Methods for DHH 5 cr. Language development, language delay resulting from hearing loss, and language for preschool and school age children with hearing loss. Strategies for oral and written language to preschool and school age children with hearing loss.

SPED 404 Speech Methods in DHH 5 cr. Speech development, speech production deficits resulting from hear ing loss, and models for teaching speech to preschool and school age children with hearing loss. Strategies for teaching speech to preschool and school age children with hearing loss.

SPED 406 Working with Families in DHH 2 cr. Awareness and understanding of various influences that a hearing loss has on a person's social, vocational, emotional, and psychological development. An overview of the literature along with various implementation and techniques as models.

SPED 408 Reading/Academic Methods DHH 4 cr. Methods of teaching reading, mathematics, social studies, and science to children with hearing loss with an emphasis on the development of cognition and language. Curricula and strategies for preschool and school age will be addressed.

SPED 409 Aural Rehabilitation 2 cr. Personal and classroom amplification systems for preschool and school age children with hearing impairments. Prerequisite(s): CD 342.

SPED 410 Intro to Learning Disabilities 3 cr. An overview of the field of learning disabilities including various concepts, strategies, practices, and trends. Prerequisite(s): SPED 110.

SPED 420 Adaptations in Regular Education 2 cr. This course outlines a variety of curriculum adaptations for elementary and secondary teachers. These adaptations can be used in many regular education settings. Prerequisite(s): SPED 110, and 210, 310 or 410.

SPED 441 Methods for Mild IDDA 3 cr. Focuses on programming the developmental sequences in reading, writing, arithmetic, and language in a life experience curriculum for persons with mild IDDA. Public Law 101-476 (IDEA) and writing IEP's are stressed. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education or declared IDD major.

SPED 442 Methods for Moderate IDDA 3 cr. Study of the organization of programs and curricula in behavior management, task analysis, methods, and materials for educating persons with moderate IDDA. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education or declared IDD major.

SPED 444 Vocational Planning for IDDA 3 cr. Methods and materials for vocational training of students including vocational evaluation, job analysis, work skills, job placement, on-the-job training, and follow-up services. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education or declared IDD major.

SPED 445 Collaborations in SPED 3 cr. Basic principles of individual and group guidance necessary for successful integration of persons with IDDA into society; includes techniques of parental interviewing and reporting designed to provide home-school communication.

SPED 450 Interdisciplinary Issues in Intellectual Developmental Disabilities 1 cr. A seminar course on intellectual developmental disabilities and interdisciplinary service strategies.

SPED 491 Senior Seminar in IDD 4 cr. Seminars on various topics for seniors in the IDD and education of the deaf.

SPED 496 Field Experience in Intellectual Developmental Disabilities 4 cr. Practical experience in the development of individual program plans; administration, documentation, and storage of medications; positioning, turning, and transferring techniques; and observation, assistance and documentation of seizure activities.

SPED 497 Externship in IDD 8 cr. Senior practicum for nonteaching IDD majors in community programs or agencies serving persons with IDD or other developmental disabilities.

SPED 498 Advanced Field Experience 1-12 cr. A supervised practicum in the habilitation of preschool and school age children. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education and instructor approval.

SPED 499 Special Topics in SPED 1-8 cr. Special Topics. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

Studies in Community and Environment

SCE 101 Environments and Societies 3 cr. Explores the intertwined relationships between communities and their environments at the local and global level from a social science perspective. Topics will include human impact on the environment and vice versa, the role of geography in human relations, historical perspectives on the role environmental plays, resource use versus conservation, public and urban space issues, economic and ethical implications of environmental policy, and social problems related to environmental impacts that are unequally distributed among demographic groups in society.

SCE 102 Environments and Humanities 3cr. An introduction to the basic underpinnings of environmental literature, ecocriticism, and place studies (with a focus on the US West), and will consider how place or nature intersect with race, class, and gender. Student will also explore the basic underpinnings of environmental art, land art, eco-art, and public art. In addition, student will be introduced to environmental ethics, such as the duties to and rights of non-human species and responsibilities of humans to each other and the environment.

SCE 103 Environments and Sciences 4 cr. Introduction to environmental science, including environmental policies and the roles of science in policy development. Topics addressed include enviromental systems, biodiversity, conservation and preservation, food and agriculture, environmental health, water and air pollution, global climate change, earth resources, energy, solid and hazardous wastes, and sustainability. Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 2 hours.

SCE 301 Environmental Values & Ethics 3 cr. Introduction to the field of inquiry that addresses values of nature and the ethical responsibilities of humans to each other and to the environment with respect to community and environment issues. Different types of ethics will be studied and applied to concrete examples of community and environment problems. Examples of the different ethics include utilitarian ethics, deonitc ethics, and concepts of justice. Also to be studied include whether duties or obligations exist to individuals-including non-humans, other species as a group, ecosystems, or the biosphere. Prerequisites: SCE 101, 102, 103.

SCE 360 Collaborative Study 1-4 cr. Collaborative investigation of a particular local community and environmental issue by a group of students using an interdisciplinary approach. Topic is set prior to the course. Prerequisites: SCE 101, 102, 103.

SCE 394 Directed Research 1-4 cr. Investigation of a particular local community and environmental issue using an interdisciplinary approach. Topic is set prior to the course based on student interests and community needs. Prerequisite(s): SCE 260

SCE 397 Internship 3 cr. An internship is a work-related learning experience for individuals who wish to develop hands on work experience in a certain occupational field or profession, or provide valuable service to a community and its citizens. Prerequisite(s): SCE 101, 102, 103

SCE 494 Senior Capstone 3 cr. Students, having completed their research or creative project on a particular community and environmental issue in SCE 394, write a thesis, give a public presentation, and defend their work to their thesis committee. Prerequisite(s): SCE 394 and senior status.

Theatre

THEA 110 Introduction to Theatre Arts 3 cr. (GE3) Basic introduction to the theory and principles of theatrical presentation including dramatic literature, acting, stagecraft and dramatic analysis, with emphasis on practical application.

THEA 120 Intro to Drama Lit & Analysis 3 cr. Introductory course in the literature of drama. Plays representative of important periods of theatre history are discussed and analyzed in their cultural context as well as for possible performance. Students work to understand the plays' potential meanings for modern audiences. The play list will carry over to the THEA 161 Acting 1 and be the basis for the students drama lit study for the remainder of their theatre education.

THEA 121 The One-Act Play 2 cr. The course revolves around the study of the one-act play, how it differs from the full length play, as well as the reading of several one-acts and evaluating them as per their availability and appropriateness for competition.

THEA 161 Acting I 3 cr. A basic introduction to acting styles and techniques with emphasis on mime, improvisation, characterization, voice, movement, and script analysis.

THEA 162 Audition Techniques 1 cr. The selection, rehearsal, and performance of theatrical scenes and monologues as well as musical theatre material for the purpose of auditions.

THEA 194 Independent Study 1-3 cr. Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of theatre. Theatre majors or minors only.

THEA 199 Special Topics 1-3 cr. Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of theatre. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

THEA 201 Theatre Practicum 1 cr. Participation in a significant capacity in any communication arts sponsored theatrical production above and beyond the requirements of a specific course. Repeatable up to eight credits.

THEA 202 Ryan Audition 1 cr. Credit offered to those students selected to audition for the Irene Ryan Regional Scholarships. The course will be the selection, rehearsal, and presentation of various theatrical pieces.

THEA 222 Make-up 2 cr. Theory and practical laboratory work in stage make-up applications, including mask building.

THEA 250 Creative Drama 3 cr. The study of creativity, and the relationship of drama and creative play culminating with activities centering around storytelling and children's theatre.

THEA 270 Stagecraft 3 cr. The course will begin with the stage managers approach to script analysis for a play in production and will conclude with the fundamental approach to the implementation of the scenic artist's designs for the stage through the study of set construction, painting techniques, and technical coordination.

THEA 275 Production Design 5 cr. The focus of the course will be design process, as applied to the creation of the theatrical environment, including analysis, research, communication, and implementation. Students will complete design project in costuming, scenery, and lighting. Prerequisite(s): THEA 270

THEA 296 Study Tour 1-3 cr. MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit. Does not count towards the theatre major or minor.

THEA 297 Internship 1-2 cr. Hands-on experience in the discipline.

THEA 350 Theatre History, Criticism, and Literature I 3 cr. A survey of the development of the theatre and dramatic literature from Greeks to 1642.

THEA 351 Theatre History, Criticism, and Literature II 3 cr. A complete and critical study of the theatre from 1642 to 1900. Dramatic analysis, performance theory and style, architecture, advancements, and individual contributors are included in the study.

THEA 352 Theatre in the Classroom 3 cr. This course will allow the student to build on the foundation learned in THEA 250 Creative Drama. Students will continue to explore various approaches to the delivery of creative drama activities. A project design and in-classroom work will be a final project. Prerequisite(s): THEA 250.

THEA 353 Plays for the Young 3 cr. The main thrust of this course is to read and study the history, range, progression, and variety of dramatic materials for and with the young. The student will develop a critical attitude towards such works and develop an insight and expertise in the selection of materials appropriate to different ages and situations.

THEA 361 Acting II 3 cr. In-depth study of modern trends in acting technique with special emphasis placed upon the creation of character through various acting styles. Prerequisite(s): THEA 161 or consent of instructor.

THEA 385 Directing 3 cr. Fundamentals of composition, stage movement, stage business, and rehearsal as applied to the directing of plays. Prerequisite(s): THEA 161 or consent of instructor.

THEA 386 Playwriting 3 cr. A study of the basic principles of writing for the stage. Emphasis will be on developing short forms for production the ten-minute play, one-page play, and the monologue.

THEA 387 Playwrights Lab 1 cr. Development of original student-written plays. Focus will be on revision of ten-minute scripts for production. Prerequisite: THEA 386 or consent of instructor.

THEA 394 Independent Study 1-3 cr. Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of theatre. Theatre majors or minors only.

THEA 395 Service Learning 3 cr. Students will utilize reflection and research (both primary and secondary) to integrate (a) personal community or global service experience(s). Theatre majors or minors only.

THEA 399 Special Topics 1-3 cr. Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of theatre. Theatre majors or minors only. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

THEA. 401 Tour Show 3 cr. This course is designed for the both the Theater and non-Theater major/minor to acquaint the student with the basic principles of acting, stage work, and touring. These principles include, but are not limited to: script reading and analysis; a technical production process that would accommodate a limited budget and specifics to be performed in various spaces and conditions; the research and preparation of materials that would allow a non- traditional audience member and teacher to view the production and be able to incorporate performance materials back into a regular classroom activity.

THEA 414 Theatre Management 3 cr. This course will emphasize the business of theatre: Production Procedures from beginning to end; grant writing, box office procedures, publicity policies, and audience development. Prerequisite(s): BADM 301.

THEA 450 Contemporary Drama 3 cr. A study of dramatic literature from 1952 to the present. Plays from England, Europe, and the Americas will be represented. Course may be repeated as the content changes.

THEA 480 Advanced Theatre Performance 5 cr. The focus of the course will be twofold: script analysis/dramaturgy, and advanced theories and practice in acting and stage direction. Students will do a variety of script analysis projects leading to production concepts as discussed by the dramaturge, actor, and director. The final project will be a finished full length theatrical performance directed and acted by members of the course. Prerequisite(s): THEA 161, 361 and 385

THEA 486 Playwriting II 3 cr. Advanced study in playwriting, emphasizing the one-act play and experimental forms.

THEA 496 Study Tour 1-3 cr. MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit. Does not count towards the theatre major or minor.

THEA 497 Internship 1-2 cr. Hands-on experience in the discipline.