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Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions E - H

Early Childhood Education
Economics
Education
English
Finance
French
Gender/Women's Studies
Geography
Geology
German
Health Management Science
Health, Physical Education and Recreation
History
Honors
Humanities

Early Childhood Education

ECE 215 Infant/Toddler Development 2 cr. Explores the child's growth and development from birth to 36 months. Gives candidates a basis for understanding normal developmental needs of children and a means of meeting them in the children's home, childcare center, and community environments. Prerequisite: ED 260 and at least sophomore status.

ECE 310 Home-School-Comm Relations 2 cr. Explores home-school-community relations. Includes history, parental involvement in school, parent-teacher conferences, home visits, parent and community programs, and community resources. Prerequisites: ED 320 and admission to Teacher Education. Co-requisite: ECE 335 and at least junior status.

ECE 312 Methods: Arts Integration 2 cr. Explores and uses the fine and performing arts as primary pathways to learning in young children. Includes selecting materials, creating environments, and planning lessons and activites that integrate art, music, and movement across curriculum disciplines. Prerequisites: ED 320, ECE 335, admission to Teacher Education and at least junior status.

ECE 313 The Emergent Reader 2 cr. Explores a wide variety of developmentally appropriate instructional practices for teaching early childhood learners multiple ways of communicating and experiencing language through books and media programs. Emphasis is placed on integrating reading, writing, speaking, and listening as forms of creative personal expression. Effective methods of teaching children how to decode and encode print are studied. Prerequisites: ED 320, ELED 352, ECE 335, admission to teacher education, and at least Junior status.

ECE 314 Mathematics & The Young Child 2 cr. Explores curriculum and methods for teaching mathematics in pre-K through grade 3. Candidates actively engage in projects and activites that help them develop a conceptual understanding of teaching mathematics in a cooperative an constructivist environment where children view themselves as mathematicians. Emphasis is placed on the use of manipulatives, problem solving activities, and children's literature in the planning and organizing of developmentally appropriate classroom activities and lessons. Prerequisites: ED 320, ECE 335, and at least junior status.

ECE 335 Early Childhood Education 3 cr. Study of early childhood learning theories, developmentally appropriate materials, classroom arrangement, observational techniques, and curriculum planning. Actual experiences with materials, observation, and field experience. Prerequisite: ED 320.

ECE 360 Language Acquisition: The Child 3 cr. Language activity includes speaking, writing, reading and listening. Coursework will center on how language is acquired, the functions of language and how language develops. Examine how teachers can best support the growth of children as language learners and users. Prerequisite(s): ED 320.

ECE 361 Observation and Assessment, Early Childhood Education 3 cr. Students will learn about and actively engage in a variety of observational methods to assess the social, motor, and cognitive growth of young children. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education and ED 320.

ECE 411 Leadership & Supervision 3 cr. Explores effective organization of early childhood programs and looks at managing the day-to-day operations of a program. Candidates examine leadership frameworks and unique leadership styles and how to apply the principles of leadership to create vision, become an agent of change, and model professional and ethical behavior. Candidates examine supervision frameworks for effective recruitment, selection, and orientation practices. Candidates study a comprehensive model for supervising staff, promoting ongoing professional development, and creating a strengths-based team in nuturing positive teaching/learning environments. Prerequisites: ED 320, ECE 215, 310, 313, 335, 360, 361, and admission to Teacher Education. Co-requisite: ECE 430.

ECE 430 Preschool Curriculum, Activities and Practicum 3 cr. Study of development of 4-7 year olds and procedures in preschool planning including teaching techniques and expressive materials for the campus preschool. Laboratory. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education, ED 320, and at least junior status. Co-requisites: ELED 421, 422, 423, and SCI 426. Course restricted to Early Childhood and Elementary Education majors.

Economics

ECON 201 Principles of Microeconomics 3 cr. (GE7) Supply and demand, price and output determination in the product and resource markets, consumer demand, elasticity, costs and profits, and international trade.

ECON 202 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 cr. (GE7) Nature, method, and scope of economic analysis; nature of economic growth; inflationary tendencies and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policies, international finance. (May be taken before ECON 201.)

ECON 312 Price Theory 3 cr. Analysis of individual consumer demand, principles of production, costs, pricing and output decisions under different market structures. Prerequisite(s): ECON 201.

ECON 314 National Income Analysis 3 cr. Study of major movements in national income, production, employment, price levels, as well as policy related to growth and equilibrium. Prerequisite(s): ECON 202.

ECON 315 Labor Economics 3 cr. Survey of labor-management relations that examines the policies and objectives of labor unions and their impact on the broader society, and includes union history and government, organizing and bargaining, economics of the labor market and wage determination, government control and major laws that affect labor-management relations. Prerequisite(s): ECON 201 and 202.

ECON 318 Money and Banking 3 cr. Nature and functions of U.S. depository institutions (especially commercial banks, savings and loans, and credit unions); their regulation with particular emphasis on the Federal Reserve System's monetary policy and instruments of control and an introduction to monetary theory. Prerequisite(s): ECON 201 and 202.

ECON 320 Environ and Nat Resource Econ 3 cr. This class engages students in standard economic theory through the lens of environmental issues such as global climate change and overpopulation. The approach of this class combines traditional microeconomic analysis with a detailed examination of macro-level ecological problems that require local, national, and global policy solutions. It discusses how to utilize natural resources efficiently and issues related to the usage of natural resources. Prerequisite(s): ECON 201.

ECON 410 Managerial Economics 3 cr. Managerial Economics is an application of the part of Microeconomics that focuses on the topics that are of greatest interest and importance to managers. The purpose of learning this subject is to help managers make better decisions. Topics include demand and cost analysis, market structures, pricing decision, and government regulations. Some powerful analytical tools such as regression analysis, business forecasting, and linear programming will also be covered to assist the decision making process. Prerequisite(s): ECON 201 and 202.

ECON 414 International Economics 3 cr. Study of the causes of international trade, classical and neoclassical models of international trade, the movement of money, goods, and factors of production over national boundaries, role of trade barriers and balance of payments. Prerequisite(s): ECON 201 and 202.

ECON 418 History of Economic Thought 3 cr. Study of evolution of economic thought under different social and political background, like mercantilism, physiocracy, classical economies, historical school and Socialist doctrines. Prerequisites: ECON 201 or 202.

ECON 419 Economic Planning and Development 3 cr. Study of basic techniques and methods in planning which facilitate various levels of economic development. The application of the planning strategies necessary to effect desirable economic development is also undertaken. Prerequisite(s): ECON 201 and 202.

Education

ED 250 Foundations of Education 2 cr. Study of the historical, philosophical, and sociological concepts that have impacted the development of American public schools. Includes an orientation to the teaching profession and a field experience.

ED 250H Foundations of Education 2 cr. Study of the historical, philosophical and sociological concepts that have impacted the development of American public schools. Includes an orientation to the teaching professional and a field experience. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program.

ED 260 Educational Psychology 2 cr. Emphasizes learning theory, effective teaching, classroom management and child development as applied to educational settings.

ED 260H Educational Psychology 2 cr. Emphasizes learning theory, effective teaching classroom management, and child development as applied to educational settings. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program.

ED 320 Curriculum, Planning and Assessment 3 cr. The development of curriculum for the public schools and strategies for the planning, delivery and assessment of instruction. Prerequisite(s): ED 250 and 260.

ED 350 Middle School Philosophy and Curriculum 3 cr. Acquaints students with the philosophy of middle school education and current practices in middle school curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Prerequisite(s): ED 320.

ELED 352 Foundations of Reading 3 cr. Principles, techniques, and approaches for implementing a developmental reading program in the elementary school. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education and ED 320.

ELED 370 Handwriting Instruction 1 cr. Introduction to handwriting systems and instructional methodology. Elective. Grading Basis: S/U. Prerequisite(s): Sophomore, junior or senior status.

ED 380 Technology in Teaching 2 cr. Strategies for the instructional uses of technology including multimedia presentation, e-mail, internet, spreadsheets, data bases, and emerging technologies. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education and ED 320 or CD majors.

ED 402 Reading in the Content Area 3 cr. The study of teaching reading at elementary, middle school, and high levels; ways of responding to literature and other written materials, content area reading for different purposes, application of strategies and study skills, and use of a variety of performance assessments. Prerequisite: ED 320.

ELED 421 Elementary Mathematics Methods 3 cr. Practicum in teaching mathematics to children in cooperative learning groups through the use of manipulative materials, symbolic representations, and problem solving approaches. Observation and participation in a planned teaching experience in a school setting will illustrate and support the learning processes. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education, ED 320, Math 277 and 377. Corequisites: ELED 422, 423, 424, SCI 426. Course restricted to Elementary Education majors.

ELED 422 Elementary Language Arts Methods 3 cr. Encompasses curriculum, theory, and methodology in language arts. Observation and participation in a planned teaching experience in a school setting will illustrate and support the learning processes. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education and ED 320, ELED 352. Corequisite: ELED 421, 423, 424, SCI 426. Course restricted to Elementary Education majors.

ELED 423 Elementary Reading Methods 3 cr. Principles, techniques, approaches and materials for teaching reading in grades K through 8. Observation and participation in a planned teaching experience in a school setting will illustrate and support the learning processes. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education and ED 320, ELED 352. Corequisite: ELED 421, 422, 424, SCI 426. Course restricted to Elementary Education majors.

ELED 424 Elementary Social Studies Methods 3 cr. Curriculum, theory, and methodology in the teaching of social studies. Observation and participation in a planned teaching experience in a school setting will illustrate and support the learning process. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education and ED 320. Corequisite: ELED 421, 422, 423, SCI 426. Course restricted to Elementary Education majors.

ED 440 Remedial Reading 3 cr. Diagnosis and treatment of children with reading difficulties. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education and ED 352.

ED 441 Clinical Practice in Remedial Reading 3 cr. Supervised practice in a clinical remedial reading situation. Pre-requisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education and ED 352, 440.

ED 451 Middle School Teaching Strategies 3 cr. Designed to develop the skills and teaching strategies to implement a middle school program. Stresses teaming, thematic curriculum development, advising, and working with parents. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education and ED 320.

ED 460 Managing the Learning Environment 2 cr. Strategies for successfully creating a positive learning environment in the classroom; strategies for dealing with the disruptive student, strategies for creating positive parental involvement in student learning. Prerequisite(s): ED 320 and admission to Teacher Education.

ED 460H Managing the Learning Environment 2 cr. Strategies for successfully creating a positive learning environment, strategies for dealing with the disruptive student and strategies for creating positive parental involvement in student learning. Creative, intellectual, in-depth study of management strategies will be required. Pre-requisites: ED 320, Admission to Teacher Education and admission to the Honors Program.

ED 470 Teaching Diverse Learners 2 cr. (Diversity) Adapting teaching strategies to cultural, ethnic, linguistic, developmental and physical differences in the classroom. Collaborating with related professions in individualizing instruction. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education and ED 320.

ED 470H Teaching Diverse Learners 2 cr. Adapting teaching strategies to cultural, ethnic, linguistic, development and physical differences in the classroom. Collaborating with related professionals in individualizing instruction. Creative, in-depth intellectual study of diversity. Pre-requisites: ED 320, Admission to Teacher Education and admission to the Honors Program.

ED 480 Clinical Practicum in Education 1 cr. This course is designed to give education majors an opportunity to have 30 hours of practical experience. Placements in schools settings are arranged by the Teacher Advisement and Field Placement office. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education, a methods class, and departmental approval.

ED 491 Student Teaching, Kindergarten 4-16 cr. Supervised teaching in kindergarten. Prerequisite(s): Recommendation by advisor, division/department chairperson, and TEAC; admission to Teacher Education; and completion of all other required education coursework. Grading Basis: S/U.

ED 492 Student Teaching, Elementary 4-16 cr. Supervised teaching in elementary schools. Prerequisite(s): Recommendation by advisor, division/department chairperson, and TEAC; admission to Teacher Education; and completion of all other requires education coursework. Grading Basis: S/U.

ED 493 Student Teaching, Secondary 4-16 cr. Supervised teaching in secondary school. Prerequisite(s): Recommendation by advisor, division/department chairperson, and TEAC; admission to Teacher Education; and completion of all other required education coursework. Grading Basis: S/U.

ED 494 Student Teaching, K-12 4-16 cr. Supervised teaching in both elementary and secondary levels in restricted areas. Prerequisite(s): Recommendation by advisor, division/department chairperson, and TEAC; admission to Teacher Education; and completion of all other required education coursework. Grading Basis: S/U.

ED 495 Student Teaching, Special Areas 4-16 cr. Supervised teaching in special areas: mentally handicapped and education of the deaf. Prerequisite(s): Recommendation by advisor, division/department chairperson, and TEAC; admission to Teacher Education; and completion of all other required education coursework.

ED 497 Mentored Clinical Practicum 5-16 cr. This course is designed to provide a one year mentored clinical internship for classroom teachers. Prerequisite(s) include departmental approval and emergency licensure by the Educational Standards and Practices Board of North Dakota.

English

ENGL 110 College Composition I 3 cr. (GE1) Guided practice in college-level reading, writing, and critical thinking. Emphasis on writing processes, and on approaches to critical reading. Does not apply toward the English major/minor.

ENGL 111H Honors Composition I 3 cr. (GE1) The first course in the honors curriculum, ENGL 111 takes the place of ENGL 110. The course is reading intensive and encourages intellectual independence. Admission to the Honors Program is not a Prerequisite(s), but ACT scores of 25 in reading and writing are required. Does not apply to the English major/minor.

ENGL 120 College Composition II 3 cr. (GE1) Advanced practice in college-level writing from sources and in applying rhetorical strategies. Emphasis on rhetorical strategies and incorporating research in academic writing. Does not apply toward the English major/minor. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 110.

ENGL 121H Honors Composition II 3 cr. (GE1) The second course taken in the honors curriculum. Replaces ENGL 120 in the General Education program. Independent research and writing focuses on a rigorous study of literature. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 110 or 111; admission to Honors Program or permission of the Honors Director. Does not apply toward the English major/minor.

ENGL 209 Introduction to Linguistics 3 cr. Entry level knowledge for the scientific study of language, including such topics as phonology, semantics, grammar, and related cultural history.

ENGL 211 Introduction to Creative Writing 3 cr. Introduction to the form and craft of imaginative writing in fiction and poetry.

ENGL 220 Introduction to Literature 3 cr. (GE3) Reading and discussion of literary forms such as the short story, the novel, poetry, and drama, with emphasis on common literary terminology.

ENGL 225 Introduction to Film 3 cr. (GE3) Introduction to the aesthetic, technical, and social significance of selected films, with emphasis on understanding basic film vocabulary and narrative structure. Four studio hours per week.

ENGL 231 Bible as Literature 3 cr. (GE3) Study of the Bible from a literary point of view.

ENGL 231H Bible as Literature 3 cr. (GE3) Study of the Bible from a literary point of view. The class emphasizes themes and the influence of biblical themes on world culture. Prerequisite: ENGL 110 or 111H.

ENGL 232 World Mythology 3 cr. (GE3-Diversity) The study of representative myths, legends, and folklore from various cultures with emphasis upon the literary respects of myth.

ENGL 238 Children's Literature 3 cr. Introductory study of picture books and poetry; folk tales, fairy tales, myth, and legend; modern fiction, both realistic and imaginary; historical fiction; and biographical and informational books for children.

ENGL 244 Writing in Multiple Genres 3 cr. Study and practice in writing techniques and strategies employed by writers in various genres, including fiction/creative nonfiction/poetry/teleplay/drama. Focus on developing skills in manipulating point of view, creating figurative language, writing realistic dialogue, developing themes and characters, and honing style to suit various audiences and genres. Read for craft by examining and analyzing the work of successful writers in various genres. Prerequisite: ENGL 110.

ENGL 251 Foundations in Brit Lit I 3 cr. (GE3) A survey of British literature from the Anglo Saxon period through the 18th century. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 110.

ENGL 252 Foundations in Brit Lit II 3 cr. (GE3) A continuing survey of British literature from the Romantic period to the present. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 110.

ENGL 261 Foundations in Am Lit I 3 cr. (GE3) A survey of American literature from the Puritans until the Civil War. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 110.

ENGL 262 Foundations in Am Lit II 3 cr. (GE3) Continuing survey of American literature since the Civil War. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 110.

ENGL 265 Native American Literature 3 cr. (Diversity) The study of Native American Indian legends, poems, and stories with emphasis on contemporary writings.

ENGL 270 Introduction to Literary Criticism 3 cr. The study of methods and assumptions of literary criticism, the reasons for and values of literary studies, and the formal academic discourse employed in English. Course serves as an introduction to the English major. Prerequisite: ENGL 110

ENGL 291 Practicum in Writing 1 cr. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education. Corequisite: ENGL 317. Grading Basis S/U

ENGL 299 Special Topics 1-3 cr. Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of language and/or literature. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

ENGL 315 Professional and Technical Writing 3 cr. Concentrated instruction and practice in technical and job-related expository writing.

ENGL 317 Teaching Writing 3 cr. Study of methods of teaching writing with emphasis on contemporary theories. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 120.

ENGL 318 Writing Tutor Training 1 cr. The course covers practices and theories for tutoring writers. Content includes the composing process, diagnosing problems, establishing rapport, managing research and helping with second language needs. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 120.

ENGL 318L Supervised Writing Tutoring 0 cr. Supervised tutoring experience (20 hours) in the Writing Center. Co-requisite: ENGL 318. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 110 with a grade of C or higher, ENGL 120 with a grade of C. English Education majors only. Grading Basis: S/U.

ENGL 322 American Dialects in Literature and Media 3 cr. This course examines American regional dialects (e.g. African American English, Chicano English, Appalachian English) and how those dialects are represented in literature and media. Students will explore the history, development, and linguistic features of various dialects, then they will read literature and watch films that make use of those dialects. Students will evaluate the effects of authentic and stereotypical representations of dialects on audience with an eye to exploring how these representations reflect attitudes towards dialects in America.

ENGL 325 Topics in Roaring Twenties Literature 3 cr. The incredibly exciting decade of the 1920s gave us jazz, modern art, and enormous change in literary style. The course will examine cultural and literary changes, and will focus on authors such as Gertrude Stein, F.S. Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemingway.

ENGL 326 American Apocalyptic Literature 3 cr. This course traces apocalyptic literature in the Americas from the Spanish explorers and Puritan settlers, through to the twenty-first century. In it, students will read literature in a variety of genres and explore how both imagery and narrative tactics are critical in apocalyptic literature. Students will also explore how apocalyptic literature has indelibly marked American culture, politics, and social rhetoric. This course is a literary and cultural study course, not a religion or theology course.

ENGL 328 British Romantic Literature 3 cr. Windswept vistas, dashing heroes, tormented souls, Frankenstein, and Don Juan, Pride and Prejudice! From 1785-1830, Romanticism in Britain thrived. It was a revolutionary time in poetry and prose. British Romantic writers are still incredibly popular, influential, and important today.

ENGL 329 Coming of Age Novels 3 cr. Coming of age novels focus on one or more main character's psychological and moral growth. These young characters live through external adventures and inner turmoil while they grow as human beings and seek to reconcile the conflicts between self and society. In this course, students will read and discuss a variety of novels and the genre's impact and importance.

ENGL 331 Ethnicity and Indentity Search 3 cr. The identity struggle that persons of specific ethnic backgrounds encounter in their cultural contexts. Texts (including films) and topics may vary, and the ethnic focus may either be comparative or selective.

ENGL 334 Film Directors 3 cr. According to the auteur theory, some directors are the dominant creators of their films. In this seminar we'll read selected materials about several major directors, view several films by each director, and identify and discuss the recurrent patterns, techniques, and meanings that are the directors' individual signatures.

ENGL 335 Film Genres 3 cr. Films are commonly classified into broad categories, or genres, including action, war, western, comedy, science fiction, mystery/suspense, horror, drama, and family. In this seminar we'll discuss aesthetic conventions, content, cultural contexts, and socio-historical significance of films in three genres. We'll view nine or ten major films in total, and we'll read selected materials.

ENGL 337 Frontier Literature of North America 3 cr. Students in this course will explore literature from the western margins of this continent as it is/was discussed and as the Frontier slowly moved west from Western Virginia to Western PA, to North Dakota and beyond. While locations and dates change, concepts of The West and The Frontier retain elements from locale to locale. Students will explore sources of the "rugged individualism" and independence in which we pride ourselves.

ENGL 338 Topics in Adolescent Literature 3 cr. Literature written for teenagers (ages fourteen through eighteen) is uniquiely positioned because it addresses the emotional and social issues and fears unique to adolescence. In this course, students will read a variety of literature written for teens and through this literature explore topics such as race, family, technology, and coming of age. Specific topics will vary each time the course is offered, but students will explore how writers attempt to address the concerns and problems of adolescents in an increasingly complex society.

ENGL 339 Topics in African Literature 3 cr. The enormous effects of cultural change upon the Dark Continent will be studied through post-colonial African writers ranging from Chinua Achebe to V.S. Naipul. The course will continue with a study of contemporary African authors and literature.

ENGL 342 Gendered Literature 3 cr. This course will explore through literature how gender intersects with other identity categories such as sex, classs, sexuality, and race in shaping authorship, reading, and representation. Course materials will span time periods, cultures, and countries to investigate an array of experiences that interrogate concepts of gender. Through the course of the semester, students will explore the gender continuum, covering hegemonic masculinity, exaggerated femininity, and all the shades in between.

ENGL 343 Graphic Novels as Literature 3 cr. Graphic novels have been labeled as "comic" and "pop"culture, unworthy of study; however, graphic novels are rising in popularity and prestige. In this course, students will explore the evolution of the graphic novel, from its earliest forms through the present day, including stand alone novels and retellings of classical literature. Students will examine the ways in which artwork, narration, and dialogue interact to produce a hybrid piece of literature, and will have the opportunity to write their own graphic novel manuscripts.

ENGL 346 Women, Literature, Land, and Home 3 cr. The notion that a woman's place is in the home has long been used in the attempt to subjugate women. In this course, students will explore how women writers use the notions of place and home to cultivate a sense of place and an ecocritical awareness that other types of writing might not be able to. Students will also explore how a sense of place amplified by a sense of home can lead to deep understanding of cultural values and political decisions.

ENGL 348 Language Arts for the Writer 3 cr. The craft of writing with style is developed through the study of language arts and the close reading of a writer's (or writers') use of words, sentences, paragraphs, narration, characters, dialogue, details, and gestures. Personal selection of a writer by students.

ENGL 349 Letting a Thousand Flowers Bloom: The Literature and Art of China and Japan 3 cr. This course will explore significant developments in Chinese and Japanese literature and art, as well as like developments amongst Asian minority groups, all discussed in their relationship to the literature of our own time and place. Includes works by the Chinese T'ang poets and the creators of Japanese Noh Theatre, among others.

ENGL 350 Literature of the Last Twenty Years 3 cr. In this course, students will read a selection of texts written in the last twenty years in order to explore the place of recent texts and literary trends within the study of literature. The course will offer a global perspective by featuring texts from across the English-speaking world. Students will think critically about the types of literature they have seen being widely distributed, adapted, and read during their lifetimes.

ENGL 353 Science Fiction's Contributions to Society 3 cr. This course will explore the numerous inventions that have been developed as a result of the imaginations of science fiction writers. The aim of this course is to explore the ways science fiction has opened up vistas and how these vistas have affected conemporary behavior. Students will explore the ways in which science fiction has changed our society, exploring whether the changes are for the better of for the worse.

ENGL 355 Age of Shakespeare 3 cr. Study of representative works of Shakespeare. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 110.

ENGL 358 Literature of the Upper Great Plains 3 cr. Students will explore literature written in first-person about experiences of settling and of homesteading in the Upper Great Plains. Other accounts will be from children's perspectives or that was produced years after the fact. While much of the literature will be realism, some fiction will also be read for contrast. Students will compare accounts written by women and men, between Canada and Nebraska, between early nineteenth century and late twentieth century.

ENGL 359 Literature of the Wild 3 cr. This course not only provides students with a focused way of examining how American nature writers have framed human interactions with the natural environment and how these writings are relevant to current ecological problems and issues, but it also asks that they inquire about how cultural values have shaped our definitions of nature, our perceptions of and relationships to the natural environment, and our political priorities relative to the kinds of environmental problems and solutions that we address in the United States.

ENGL 360 Love, Lust, and Loss in Western Literature: The Pastoral, Elegiac, and Courtly Traditions 3 cr. This course explores the development of literary traditions of love of Ancient Greece and Rome, Medieval, Renaissance, and Romantic English Literature, and its pertinence to love traditions of our own time. The course further considers two interesting corollaries of the literary love traditions: strange sex and weird spirituality.

ENGL 363 Magical Realism 3 cr. Magical realism is a loosely defined and broadly descriptive genre in which natural laws are occasionally stretched or ignored. In this course students will explore the genre's range and variety. The reading and viewing lists will emphasize Mexican and Latin American novels and films. Students will explore the themes, characteristics, objectives, and attitudes of magical realism in order to better understand the genre's focus on the mysteriousness of the everyday real.

ENGL 364 Studies in American Poetry 3 cr. Advanced study of selected American poets. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 120 and for English majors/minors ENGL 270 is also a prerequisite(s).

ENGL 365 Media English 3 cr. Methods for incorporating the production, editing, and publishing of computer-based media into the English classroom are developed by using computer graphics, video recorders, Google docs, pods, blogs, social networks, and other net tools.

ENGL 367 Media Literacy 3 cr. In order to address the increasingly visual and digital demands of our culture and the citizens it produces, this course will explicitly deal with the dissemination of information and culture via different forms of popular media. Based on the idea that everything produced by our culture is readable text, students will read and produce both traditional and non-traditional texts in a variety of media. Students will also explore how different media changes how we process information and the impact they have on important concepts such as identity, self, culture, community, authority, and argument.

ENGL 368 Place in Detective Fiction 3 cr. From Sam Spade's San Francisco to Spenser's Boston to V.I. Warshawski's Chicago, place plays a huge role in the detective novel, often becoming a character itself. This course will examine the role of place, both real and invented, in detective novels and films. Students will read detective fiction and watch several films, and through this, they will examine how the place in which a detective operates affects the unfolding of the mystery and the detective's attempts to find out "whodunit."

ENGL 371 Post World War I British Literature 3 cr. This course includes works of literature from all over the British Empire, including Ireland, India, South Africa, Jamaica, Canada, and others, including, of course, Great Britain. The theme in many of the great works of literature we will study is the experience of empire both for the rulers and the ruled.

ENGL 374 Reading the Built Environment 3 cr. With over three-quarters of America's population now living in cities, the dynamic between humans and the environment has shifted away from the natural to the built. This course will explore the varied interactions between cities/towns and the people who live there. Students will read literary and spatial texts in order to challenge the definition and experience of community and how it changes and adapts depending on the built environment that surrounds it - the spaces where cities bleed into one another, where nature has reasserted itself within the city, or where previously - vibrant small towns and city center stagnate.

ENGL 376 The American Century: American Literature and Culture in the Twentieth Century 3 cr. In this course students will read literature produced by twentieth-century American writers, and through it explore issues of race, class, gender, and region or place. Students will also study the critical theories and aesthetic movements associated with the terms modernism and postmodernism. Students will also investigate how literature and culture intersect and inform one another.

ENGL 378 The Modernists 3 cr. This course examines that crazy experimental time in early twentieth century arts and letters when the idea of form explodes, creating all kinds of new literary and aesthetic models that changed our world. Includes works by T.S. Eliot, Gertrude Stein, William Butler Yeats, Virginia Wolf, Henry Green, Ezra Pound, and others, situated in the historic context of the two World Wars.

ENGL 383 Topics in American Black Literature 3 cr. This course includes both fiction and non-fiction with readings from oral traditions and slavery to that of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics may focus on slavery, legal cases, migrations, language (dialect to rap) or other topics. We will explore the relationship between Black Americans and hegemonic groups, and the impact of African-Americans/Blacks upon the people and cultures of America.

ENGL 385 Tracking the Sword in the Stone: Arthurian Legend, Then and Now 3 cr. This course examines the development of Arthurian Legend from its sixth century British origins through the European Middle Ages and unto the present day, for Arthur, they say, is still among us.

ENGL 386 Victorian Era British Literature 3 cr. To many readers, this is the richest era of literature in the history of the British Empire. It is the time of Dickens and George Eliot, Tennyson and Browning, the Brontes and Rossetti, Wilde and Shaw, and many others. In all these upper level British Literature courses we go much deeper into the period than we are able to in the British Literature survey courses.

ENGL 389 Warriors, Marchers, and Martyrs 3 cr. The literature of collisions are studied, whether those collisions are political, military, cultural, racial, economic, religious, environmental, gendered, or sexual oppressions or crises. Texts (including films) and topics may vary.

ENGL 390 Secondary Language Arts Methods 3 cr. Theory and practice in teaching literature, composition and language in the secondary school. Includes practicum. Prerequisite(s): Admittance to Teacher Education.

ENGL 394 Independent Study 1-3 cr. Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of English (literature, linguistics, composition, and pedagogy). Repeatable for credit.

ENGL 396 Study Abroad 1-6 cr. MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Requires academic work beyond travel itself, amount as per credit. Does not count toward English major/minor. Repeatable for credit.

ENGL 397 Internship 1-6 cr. Hands-on experience in the discipline. Placement determined at time of internship. Restricted to English and English Education majors or minors, or consent of instructor. Credits do not count towards major requirements. Repeatable for credit.

ENGL 410 Fiction Workshop 3 cr. Concentrated instruction and practice in writing fiction.

ENGL 411 Poetry Workshop 3 cr. Concentrated instruction and practice in writing poetry. Repeatable for credit.

ENGL 412 Creative Nonfiction Workshop 3 cr. Concentrated instruction and practice in writing creative nonfiction.

ENGL 435 Major Writers 3 cr. Intensive study of selected literary works by major authors. Authors and selections will vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 110 Repeatable for credit.

ENGL 491 Senior Seminar 3 cr. In-depth study of literary issues. Serves as capstone course for English degree. Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 120 and senior status. Course restricted to majors.

ENGL 496 Study Abroad 1-6 cr. MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit. Does not count towards English major/minor/BSE. Repeatable for credit.

ENGL 497 Internship 4-12 cr. Hands-on experience in the discipline. Placement determined at time of internship. Restricted to English and English Education majors or minor or consent of instructor. Credits do not count towards major requirements. Repeatable for credit

ENGL 499 Special Topics 1-3 cr. Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of language and/or literature. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

Finance

FIN 251 Personal Finance 3 cr. (GE4)Introduces the consumer to money management and the development of long and short term personal financial planning. Topics include budgeting, consumer credit, saving and investing, insurance planning, retirement and estate planning, real estate investment, and shelter planning. An excellent course for beginning business students and nonbusiness majors.

FIN 353 Corporation Finance 3 cr. Introduces the student to the essentials of financial management. Coverage includes financial analysis, working capital management, capital budgeting, cost of capital, dividend policy, and long term financing decisions. Co-Requisite/Prerequisite(s): MATH 240. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 201.

FIN 355 Investments 3 cr. Introduces the student to the principles of investment. Topics to be covered include: description of the investment environment and investment decisions; introduction to investment, security, and portfolio theories; financial statement analysis; the implications of the Efficient Markets Hypothesis for active and passive portfolio management; and analysis, valuation and management of equities, fixed income securities, indices and indexed funds, and derivative securities. Prerequisite(s): FIN 353 and ECON 201 and 202.

FIN 357 Advanced Corporate Finance 3 cr. An advanced course which examines issues related to financing the corporation including capital structure, valuation of various forms of debt and equity financing, capital budgeting decisions, dividend policy decisions, financial analysis, forecasting and managing risk with financial instruments. Prerequisite(s): FIN 353.

FIN 360 Entrepreneurial Finance 3 cr. Introduces the student to the theories, knowledge, and financial tools needed by the entrepreneur in starting, building, and harvesting a successful venture. Topics include financing a new venture, managing profit and cash flow, financing the growth of the firm, alternative financing methods, creation of value, valuation methods, financial distress, and harvesting a successful venture. A primary focus is on the financial aspect of the business plan. Prerequisite(s): FIN 353.

FIN 421 International Energy Mkts 3 cr. This course introduces students to International Energy Markets. It will examine energy industry market structure and how it relates to business decision-making. The course will examine both renewable and non-renewable energy industry market structures. The course will provide fundamental economic knowledge needed to implement decisions related to the energy industry. It will review supply and demand structures of the energy market as well as various energy forecasting methodologies. The course will use energy data analysis methodology as a tool for analyzing future energy requirements. Prerequisite(s): ECON 320, and ECON 312.

FIN 443 Real Estate Finance 3 cr. Introduces the students to the basic principles of real estate, real estate law, and real estate finance. Topics include the ownership and transfer of real estate property, legal instruments, analysis of real estate markets, real estate appraisals, legal aspects of real estate, and financing residential, commercial, and income property. Prerequisite(s): FIN 353 and ACCT 300.

FIN 451 Insurance and Risk Management 3 cr. Examines the nature of risk and risk management from a social, individual, business and organizational perspective. Explores the available risk management tools and alternatives including insurance. Prerequisite(s): FIN 353 and ACCT 300.

FIN 454 Portfolio Theory 3 cr. Studies advanced concepts relating to investments to include financial statement analysis, stock market efficiency and anomalies, derivative securities, valuation of debt, equity securities and modern portfolio theory. Prerequisite(s): FIN 355.

FIN 455 Financial Institutions and Markets 3 cr. Focuses on the management of depository and non-depository financial institutions and the use of the money and capital markets in financial management strategy. Institutional emphasis includes banks, S & L's, credit unions, investment companies, real estate investment trusts, finance companies, insurance companies, and pension funds. Prerequisite(s): FIN 353.

FIN 457 International Corporate Finance 3 cr. Examines financial management implications of exchange risk exposure, accounting conventions, international constraint on capital flows, international investment management, foreign taxation, and working capital management of international firms. Prerequisite(s): FIN 353.

FIN 458 Cases in Finance 3 cr. Emphasizes the application of financial decision making principles, tools, and techniques through case studies by synthesizing and applying knowledge gained from previous business coursework. Coverage includes financial analysis planning and control, working capital, capital budgeting, long-term financing policy, cost of capital, and financial rearrangements. Prerequisite(s): FIN 357, BADM 226 and senior standing or higher in Finance.

FIN 459 Advanced Project Evaluation 3 cr. This course addresses project evaluation and risk analysis for the energy industry and applies quantitative and statistical techniques to investment decisions. The course will emphasize modeling and forecasting methodologies. Software applications will include standard statistical and risk analysis software packages. Prerequisite(s): FIN 357

FIN 491 Seminar in Energy Topics 2 cr. This course introduces current practices and trends and reviews applications that are used in the energy industries. The topics presented will focus on both the short and long-term energy outlook for society. Both renewable and non-renewable energy topics will be presented by industry leaders and experts. Both North Dakota and global energy forecasting needs will be discussed.

FIN 497 Internships 2-9 cr. A cooperative occupational training program in the area of finance. Maximum of 3 credits will count toward major. Prerequisite(s): restricted to major, junior or senior status and consent of the department. Grading Basis: S/U.

FIN 499 Special Topics. Topics are variable. Offerings include visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

French

FREN 101 Beginning French I 4 cr. (GE3) For beginners or those entering with one or two years of high school French. Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture.

FREN 102 Beginning French II 4 cr. (GE3) A continuation of Beginning French I. Prerequisite(s): FREN 101.

FREN 194 Independent Study 1-3 cr. Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of French. French majors or minors only. Repeatable for credit.

FREN 201 Intermediate French I 4 cr. (GE3) Review of basic French with increased practice in conversation, reading and writing. Prerequisite(s): FREN 102, three years of high school French or consent of instructor.

FREN 202 Intermediate French II 4 cr. (GE3) Continuation of FREN 201. Prerequisite(s): FREN 201.

FREN 299 Special Topics 3 cr. Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of French language, literature, culture, and civilization. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

FREN 340 Conversation and Composition I 3 cr. Advanced practice in oral and written skills using cultural reading and other media. Prerequisite(s): FREN 202 or consent of instructor.

FREN 341 Conversation & Composition II 3 cr. Advanced practice in oral skills using cultural readings and other media. Prerequisite(s): FREN 202 or consent of instructor

FREN 342 Introduction to French Literature 3 cr. Designed to improve language skills with an emphasis on reading and enhance the students ability to understand literature. Includes study of poetry, drama, and narrative from France. Prerequisite(s): FREN 202 or consent of instructor and French minor.

FREN 343 French Culture 3 cr. Readings in culture and society from the French-speaking world. Prerequisite(s): FREN 202 or consent of instructor.

FREN 394 Independent Study 1-3 cr. Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of French. French majors or minors only. Repeatable for credit.

FREN 395 Service Learning 3 cr. Students will utilize reflection and research (both primary and secondary) to integrate (a) personal community or global service experience(s). French minors only.

FREN 399 Special Topics 1-3 cr. Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of French. Frenchminors only. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

FREN 496 Study Tour 1-6 cr. MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. Repeatable for credit.

Gender/Women's Studies

GS 225 Introduction to Gender/Women's Studies 3 cr. (Diversity) The course provides a general introduction to the wide array of historical, social, economic, and philosophical topics usually included within the boundaries of gender studies, and the methods used to analyze society and culture. Considers the differences between sex and gender by examining the relationships among nature, the body, and theories of social construction and performativity. Under the general rubrics of femininity and masculinity, students will examine the patriarchal structure, feminisms, non-heteronormative sexualities, sexism, and various categories of gendered existence. An interdisciplinary collection of texts from literature and theory, social sciences, psychology, pop culture, and film will be utilized.

GS 294 Independent Study 1-3 cr. Directed topics of study. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

GS 299 Special Topics 1-3 cr. Special topics in Gender Studies. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

GS 397 Internship: Medieval Fem Forum 1-3 cr. Hands- on experience assisting with the production, editing, and distribution of an international feminist scholarly journal. Admission by application. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. Grading Basis: S/U. Repeatable for credit.

GS 494 Independent Study 1-3 cr. Directed topics of study. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

GS 499 Special Topics 1-3 cr. Special topics in Gender Studies. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

WS 294 Independent Study 1-3 cr. Directed topics of study. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

WS 299 Special Topics 1-3 cr. Special topics in Women's Studies. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

WS 494 Independent Study 1-3 cr. Directed topics of study.

WS 499 Special Topics 1-3 cr. Special topics in Women's Studies. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

Geography

GEOG 110 Principles 3 cr. (GE7) Study of geography in a modern context and its synthesizing role in relation to both physical and social sciences. Major emphasis is on the relationships between people and their environment, spatial interactions, and regional structures.

GEOG 161 World Regional Geography 3 cr. (GE7-Diversity) A survey of the world's geographic regions. Focus on the location of Earth's major physical features, human populations, cultures and their interaction.

GEOG 260 Human Geography 3 cr. The world will be viewed as a complex interaction between political, economic, social, and cultural systems, illustrative of the changes that occur on the landscape over time.

GEOG 261 Countries and Cultures 3 cr. (Diversity) The course presents countries of the world through the experiences of MSU faculty native to these countries. The principal objectives are: 1) to illustrate the immense diversity of world countries and cultures, 2) to facilitate the students' understanding and appreciation of the world cultures, 3) to motivate students to learn more about other countries and cultures, 4) to help students to become citizens of the world, 5) to increase marketability of MSU students on the global job market.

GEOG 262 North America 3 cr. A thematic and regional approach to the geography of North America that stresses human patterns and relationships with the physical environment. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 110 or 161.

GEOG 263 North Dakota 3 cr. Study of the interrelationships that exist between North Dakota's physical and cultural environments. Specific topics include physiography, climate, flora, prehistoric occupation, historic development, demography, and economic structures. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 110 or 161.

GEOG 289 Intro to GIS and Mapping 3 cr. This lecture/lab course will introduce students to the history and development of map making and the fundamentals of geographic information systems [GIS].

GEOG 334 Climatology 3 cr. Climatology will be treated as the scientific study of the Earth's climates. The major aspects of meteorology which involves the study of weather conditions will be addressed. The idea of global warming will be discussed in detail. There will be no prerequisites for this course.

GEOG 360 Perception of the Environment 3 cr. This seminar will examine attitudes and perceptions people hold of their environment and how landscapes become symbolic in cultural identity. Perceptions of a variety of environments will be studied including plains, mountains, deserts, lakes, rivers, forests, deltas, rural towns, farmscapes, and urban settings. The thematic emphasis will be on how perceptions of landscapes are important to environmental ethics, community identity, and land management.

GEOG 364 Africa 3 cr. Study of the natural regions of Africa with emphasis on the climate, physical and human resources, trade, culture and their effects upon world affairs. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 110 or 161.

GEOG 365 Monsoon Asia 3 cr. A regional study of Monsoon Asia, with special emphasis on China, the Korean Peninsula, Japan, and India. Major countries of South East Asia will be discussed. Geographic and political problems of the area are renewed. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 110 or GEOG 161.

GEOG 366 Latin America and the Caribbean 3 cr. A general overview of an extremely diverse region that is the product of both physical and cultural factors which have interacted over time to produce a unique landscape. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 110 or 161.

GEOG 367 Europe and South Central Asia 3 cr. A study of the natural regions of Europe and South Central Asia [Countries of the "Middle East" as the cradle for three major world religions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam] including a consideration of climate, soil, fauna, flora, and human distribution and cultural landscapes. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 110 or 161.

GEOG 368 Geography of Russia and Central Asia 3 cr. The study will focus on the new democratic Russia and the new independent states of Central Asia. Discussion will center primarily on the region's natural resources, human ecology and cultural landscapes, political dynamics, and socio-economic circumstances, as well as the regional organization of what was the Soviet Union [USSR]. The relationship of this region with the United States of America will be entertained. Prerequisite(s): Geog 110 or Geog 161

GEOG 370 Geography of World Tourism 3 cr. A systematic description and analysis of the world's major tourism destination regions including coastal zones, alpine areas, interior lakes, and waterways, cities and cultural attractions. Geographic and economic factors affecting the development of tourism regions are considered.

GEOG 371 Spatial Analysis Techniques 3 cr. This course involves a study of cartography as the art and science of mapmaking. Students will be exposed to working concepts of geographic information systems (GIS) as a tool in the production of maps, and an introduction to global positioning systems [GPS].

GEOG 450 Cultural Geography 3 cr. As a sub-field within human geography, the seminar will address the human imprint on the physical landscape. The study will focus sharply on describing and analyzing the ways language, religion, economy,

Geology

GEOL 101 Environmental Geology with lab 4 cr. (GE6) Mankind's interaction with the earth. Major environmental problems facing citizens today including: water resources, energy and mineral resources, and geologic hazards. Local field trips. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

GEOL 101H Honors Environmental Geology with lab 4 cr. (GE6) Mankind's interaction with the earth. Major environmental problems facing citizens today including: water resources, energy and mineral resources, and geological hazards. Laboratory time will focus on small-scale research projects, in-depth discussions of particular topics including current events, and local field trips. Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 3 hours. Honors Program admission or 3.30 cumulative GPA or permission of instructor.

GEOL 105 Physical Geology with lab 4 cr. (GE6) Earth as a physical body, its structure, composition, and the geologic processes acting on and within the earth. Designed especially for students with a specific interest in geology and for those students contemplating a major in the sciences. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

GEOL 108 Earth and Planetary Science 4 cr. An introduction to the physical geology of Earth and astronomy, focusing on our solar system. Earth's materials and structure; internal and surficial processes that work to shape Earth; the history of the Earth. Introduction to astronomy, including the earth's moon, the planets and minor bodies of our solar system, the sun, and the universe beyond our solar system. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

GEOL 110 Earth Science by Inquiry 4 cr. This course uses inquiry-based methods to explore observational astronomy and some of the physical principles that shape the earth. Students will explore heat and temperature, magnetism, and optics, as well as the paths of the sun, earth and moon through space.

GEOL 127 Environmental Earth Systems 4 cr. This course is an introduction to Earth Science with an emphasis on people's connections to environmental issues. Earth science is covered within an Earth systems framework with an emphasis on interactions, now the various Earth systems interact with one another. It also deals with how Earth interacts with people, including how Earth affects people (resources, hazards), and how people affect Earth in both positive and negative ways. An underlying concept in this course is stewardship: how people can live with Earth responsibly, working toward a sustainable future. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

GEOL 210 Minerals and Rocks 3 cr. Physical, chemical, structural, and optical properties of minerals; description and identification of common rock-forming and ore minerals; mineral associations and introduction to classification of common rock types. Field trip. Offered each spring. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 105 and CHEM 121/121L.

GEOL 220 Introduction to GIS 3 cr. Introduces students to theory and techniques of GIS including data capture, management and analysis, and cartographic output. This course is especially useful for geography, environmental science, economics and business majors. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

GEOL 227 Earth Materials and Analysis 4 cr. A study of earth materials, including minerals, rocks, soil, and water, and the basic processes that relate them. It can be considered essentially a course on the rock cycle (materials and processes), and to some extent the hydrologic cycle, with some emphasis on the methods used to characterize and identify earth materials. The laboratory portion of the course will focus on forensic geology, the use of a variety of laboratory/instrumental techniques to characterize and identify earth materials. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: GEOL 127 and CHEM 127.

GEOL 240 Geology of North Dakota 2 cr. Geology of North Dakota for students with an interest in the geologic history of the state. Coverage includes sedimentary rock units of the state and history of glaciation. Lecture, 1 hour; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 105.

GEOL 260 Energy Resources 3 cr. A survey of energy resources, including fossil fuels, renewable, nuclear and unconventional sources. Emphasis on origin, use and implications of development. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 105. Offered alternate falls.

GEOL 290 Regional Geology 3 cr. A study of the geology of a particular region in the United States or abroad. Class time involves introduction to the geology and preparation for a field trip to the region. Field trip is typically 10-14 days long and may involve hiking and camping. Special fees required. May be repeated for credit. Lecture 2 hours, field trip required. Prerequisites: GEOL 101 or GEOL 105 or consent of instructor.

GEOL 300 Geologic Field Methods 3 cr. Geologic mapping and sampling techniques. Students use basic mapping instruments, gather data, record it while in the field, and construct complete and accurate geologic maps. Offered alternate falls. Lecture, 1 hour; laboratory, 4 hours. Prerequisites: GEOL 106 and 210 or consent of instructor.

GEOL 305 Methods in Mineralogy and Petrology 2 cr. Application of modern laboratory methods to the study of minerals and rocks. Methods include optical and scanning electron microscopy, analysis of bulk materials by ICP-ACES and XRD, and EDX microanalysis of minerals. Offered alternate fall semesters. Laboratory: 6 hours. Prerequisites: GEOL 210

GEOL 310 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology 3 cr. Description and classification of igneous and metamorphic rocks based on mineralogy, textures, and chemical compositions; study of the origins of rocks through laboratory investigations of suites of related rocks. Field trip. Offered alternate springs. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 305.

GEOL 311 Paleontology 4 cr. Fossilization, classification, evolution, and paleoecology. Geologic history and identification of major invertebrate phyla. Laboratory emphasizes fossil identification. Offered alternate falls. Field trip. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 4 hours. Prerequisites: GEOL 106 or BIOL 151.

GEOL 320 Oceanography 3 cr. Nature, origin, and evolution of ocean basins and sea water. Sea water chemistry, movement, and ability to support life. Life forms. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 105.

GEOL 321 Hydrogeology 3 cr. Surface water hydrology; runoff and stream flow; groundwater hydrogeology: distribution of groundwater, aquifer properties, local and regional groundwater flow, geology of groundwater occurrence; groundwater resource development and management; water law. Offered alternate springs. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 210.

GEOL 322 Geomorphology 4 cr. Processes that shape the Earth's surface. Effects of rock type, geologic structure, and climate on the formation and evolution of land forms. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 210.

GEOL 323 Global Climate Change 3 cr. Examination of physical, chemical and biological processes that cause environments to change naturally or under the influence of human activities. Consideration of small watersheds, large lake systems and global atmospheric-ocean systems including meteorological processes. Emphasis on positive and negative feedback in controlling environments and their susceptibility to change Prerequisite: GEOL 101, or 105 or 108.

GEOL 331 Soils 3 cr. Principles of soils including formation, properties, and classification. This course includes the use of soils information in environmental applications. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 210.

GEOL 340 Aqueous Geochemistry 3 cr. Principles of aqueous chemistry and their application to various geologic environments; chemical weathering, carbonate systems, clay minerals, evaporates, ocean systems, acid deposition, kinetics, solubility and redox equilibria, ion-exchange. Offered alternate springs. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 210.

GEOL 361 Structural Geology 4 cr. Stress, strain, mechanical behavior of rocks; description and interpretation of folds, faults, joints, and foliation; tectonic processes; interpretation of geologic maps and field data. Field trip. Offered alternate springs. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 6 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 210.

GEOL 410 Advanced Earth Science by Inquiry 4 cr. Course involving aiding instructors in Earth Science by Inquiry (GEOL 110). Students will conduct oral interviews with GEOL 110 students during GEOL 110 class to determine their progress. Students will be required to learn plate tectonics and observational astronomy in depth during class preparation periods. Course exposes future secondary science teachers to inquiry methods in earth science and teaches them alternate reasoning methods that can be used at a variety of instructional levels. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructors.

GEOL 411 Field Geology 6 cr. The methods of geology, including the preparation of stratigraphic columns, cross sections and geologic maps integrated with paleoenvironmental interpretation and structural history. Students must write professional level reports. Offered in summer. Prerequisites: GEOL 361, 471, and consent of instructor.

GEOL 421 Applied Hydrogeology 3 cr. Mass transport in vadose and saturated zones; origin and behavior of inorganic and organic contaminants; investigative techniques; ground-water models; site remediation. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: GEOL 321.

GEOL 471 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy 4 cr. Origins, characteristics, and classification of sedimentary rocks. Techniques of study, interpretation of data, lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, chronostratigraphy, and correlation. Offered alternate falls. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisites: GEOL 106 and 210.

GEOL 494 Directed Research in Geology 1-2 cr. Students conduct research under direction of a faculty mentor. The topic and goals are agreed to by student and mentor. Repeatable for credit.

German

GERM 101 Beginning German I 4 cr. (GE3) For beginners or those entering with one or two years of high school German. Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture.

GERM 102 Beginning German II 4 cr. (GE3) A continuation of Beginning German I . Prerequisite(s): GERM 101.

GERM 194 Independent Study 1-3 cr. Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of German. German majors or minors only.

GERM 201 Intermediate German I 4 cr. (GE3) Review of basic German with increased practice in conversation and reading. Prerequisite(s): GERM 102, three years of high school German, or consent of instructor.

GERM 202 Intermediate German II 4 cr. (GE3) Continuation of GERM 201. Prerequisite(s): GERM 201.

GERM 220 German Film 3 cr. An exploration of socio-cultural, historical and political issues in non-mainstream German film. Supplementary readings on modern German art and literature in English translation. Includes a cross-cultural unit on censorship in the arts during the cold war. Taught in English

GERM 340 Conversation & Composition I 3 cr. Advanced practice in oral skills using cultural readings and other media. Prerequisite(s): GERM 202 or consent of instructor.

GERM 341 Conversation & Composition II 3 cr. Advanced practice in oral and written skills using cultural reading and other media. Prerequisite(s): GERM 202 or consent of instructor.

GERM 342 Introduction to German Literature 3 cr. Designed to improve language skills with an emphasis on reading and to enhance the student's ability to understand literature. Includes study of poetry, drama, and narrative from the German-speaking world. Prerequisite(s): GERM 202 or consent of instructor.

GERM 343 German Culture 3 cr. Readings in culture and society from the German-speaking world. Prerequisite(s): GERM 202 or consent of instructor.

GERM 394 Independent Study 1-3 cr. Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of German. German majors or minors only. Repeatable for credit.

GERM 395 Service Learning 3 cr. Students will utilize reflection and research (both primary and secondary) to integrate (a) personal community or global service experience(s). German majors or minors only.

GERM 399 Special Topics 1-3 cr. Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of German. German majors or minors only. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

GERM 422 Genres or Periods in German Literature 3 cr. Study of a major genre or period in German literature. Topic varies from year to year.

GERM 450 Senior Capstone Project in German 3 cr. Individual research project on a cultural topic approved by the instructor one semester prior to enrollment in the course. Course restricted to majors. Repeatable for credit.

GERM 496 Study Tour 1-6 cr. MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. Does not count towards the German or German Education major or minor. Repeatable for credit.

GERM 499 Special Topics 1-4 cr. Topics will vary from year to year depending on student backgrounds and needs. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

Health Management Science

HMS 151 Stress Management 2 cr. (GE4) Focuses on utilizing concepts related to stress and stress management strategies to achieve holistic high level wellness.

HMS 203 Health Care Through the Life Span 3 cr. Provides an overview of promotion of health and prevention of illness throughout the life span.

HMS 208 Medical Terminology 2 cr. Comprehensive examination of prefixes, stems, and suffixes as well as emphasis on pronunciation, spelling, and definitions of words used by health professionals including key pathology, diagnostic and treatment procedure terms.

HMS 213 Life Span Growth and Development 3 cr. Focuses on human growth and development throughout the life span. Prerequisite(s): PSY 111. Classroom Study = 45 hrs.

HMS 215 Principles of Pharmacology 3 cr. Provides a survey of all major drug groups as they apply to providing safe, therapeutic client care.

HMS 240 Nutrition 3 cr. Nutrition and application to human dietary needs of people at different ages.

HMS 243 Pathophysiology 3 cr. Provide fundamental knowledge of the structural and functional changes caused by disease and alterations in body function. Emphasis is placed on understanding changes and responses that produce signs and symptoms in common health problems. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 220 and BIOL 221.

HMS 260 Introduction to Public Health 3 cr. Examines the history, biomedical basis, disciplines (epidemiology, statistics, social and behavioral sciences), and techniques of public health, including education and policy development. Focuses on the health care system, medical care, and trends in public health. Prerequisite(s): sophomore standing or departmental approval.

HMS 279 Death and Dying 3 cr. Provides a holistic approach to end-of-life issues, including death, dying, and bereavement.

HMS 322 Therapeutic Touch 2 cr. This elective course explores the scientific, theoretical, and clinical foundations of therapeutic touch. Contemporary research findings are discussed and critiqued. Blends both didactic and experiential learning into a balanced, grounded approach to this new version of an ancient, caring, healing art. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior year or faculty approval. CS = 30.*

HMS 333 Transcultural Health Care 3 cr. (Diversity) Presents framework for health care providers to learn concepts and characteristics of diverse populations to provide culturally competent care for individuals, families, and communities.

HMS 379 Health and Physiological Aspects of Aging 3 cr. Examines concepts of health, physiological changes, and health related practices of older adults. Required for Gerontology minor.

HMS 460 Quality and Risk Management in Health Care 3 cr. Examines the fundamentals of a health care quality and risk management program, including risk identification, loss prevention, loss reduction, claims management process, risk financing, legal-ethical factors, and clinical risk exposures. Provides experience in quality and risk management practices that are unique to the health care settings. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing, recommended for nursing majors & those with healthcare &/or management background.

HMS 463 Issues in Healthcare Regulation and Professional Practice 3 cr. Examines a variety of agencies that oversee and regulate healthcare in the United States. Focuses on a variety of professional standards and laws that affect quality of care delivery and managerial decision making. Prerequisite: Senior standing, recommended for nursing majors & those with healthcare &/or management background.

Health, Physical Education and Recreation

HPER 100 Concepts of Fitness and Wellness 2 cr. (GE4) Provides information and skill training directed to assessing the health related components of physical fitness, proper nutritional needs for performing physical activities, laboratory activities (group fitness, calisthenics, walk/jog, and weight training), and the cognitive concepts of health related fitness.

HPER 101 Dance 1 cr. (GE4) Requires active participation and fundamental movement, including but not limited to social, folk and square dance.

HPER 102 Jogging and Conditioning 1 cr. Instruction, practice, and participation in the basic skills, body mechanics, and terminology associated with jogging and power walking. An emphasis is placed on developing a personal fitness program to fit the individual's needs and current abilities.

HPER 103 Beginning Gymnastics 1 cr. Requires active participation in fundamental tumbling skills, movement fundamentals, and warm-up.

HPER 104 Team Sports 1 cr. Requires active participation in (but not limited to) speedball, flickerball, basketball, and softball.

HPER 105 Outdoor Activities I 1 cr. (GE4) Requires active participation in (but not limited to) snow skiing and other outdoor related activities. Fees apply to specific activities.

HPER 106 Varsity Soccer 1 cr. Requires active participation in varsity soccer. Repeatable for credit.

HPER 107 Introduction to Physical Education 2 cr. Provides prospective physical educators with an insight into the broad scope of physical education. The student will have the opportunity to obtain an understanding and appreciation of this multifaceted field. Opportunities to assess what physical education offers in terms of career potential. Pre- or corequisite: HPER 100.

HPER 108 Volleyball 1 cr. Requires active participation in the fundamental skills and sport of volleyball.

HPER 109 Racket Sports 1 cr. (GE4) Requires active participation in (but not limited to) tennis, badminton, racquetball, and pickleball. Additional Course Fee.

HPER 110 Beginning Swimming 1 cr. (GE4) Requires active participation in the fundamental skills of swimming. An emphasis will be placed on water survival skills based upon the American Red Cross water safety guidelines.

HPER 111 Varsity Football 1 cr. Requires active participation in varsity football. Repeatable for credit.

HPER 112 Varsity Basketball 1 cr. Requires active participation in varsity basketball. Repeatable for credit.

HPER 113 Varsity Track & Field 1 cr. Requires active participation in varsity track and field. Repeatable for credit.

HPER 114 Varsity Tennis 1 cr. Requires active participation in varsity tennis. Repeatable for credit.

HPER 115 Varsity Golf 1 cr. Requires active participation in varsity golf. Repeatable for credit.

HPER 116 Varsity Cross Country 1 cr. Requires active participation in varsity cross country. Repeatable for credit.

HPER 117 Varsity Volleyball 1 cr. Requires active participation in varsity volleyball. Repeatable for credit.

HPER 118 Varsity Cheerleading 1 cr. Requires active participation in cheerleading during the fall or winter sports. Repeatable for credit.

HPER 119 Varsity Softball 1 cr. Requires active participation in varsity softball. Repeatable for credit.

HPER 120 Weight Training 1 cr. (GE4) Instruction, practice and participation in the basic skills, body mechanics, and terminology associated with weight training. An emphasis is placed on developing a weight training program to fit the individual's needs and current abilities.

HPER 121 Varsity Baseball 1 cr. Requires active participation in varsity baseball. Repeatable for credit.

HPER 122 Varsity Dance Team 1 cr. Requires active participation in varsity dance. Repeatable for credit.

HPER 123 Outdoor Activities II 1 cr. Requires active participation in (but not limited to) canoeing and other associated outdoor activities. Fees apply to specific activities.

HPER 124 Individual Sports 1 cr. Requires active participation, terminology, knowledge and skills associated with (but not limited to) golf and archery. Additional Course Fee.

HPER 125 Intermediate Swimming 1 cr. (GE4) Requires active participation in the perfection of swimming skills.

HPER 126 Group Fitness 1 cr. (GE4) Requires active participation in fundamental movement skills and routines associated with group fitness, aqua or yoga. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

HPER 127 Advanced Hunter Education 1 cr. (GE4) Provides North Dakota Hunter Education certification, firearms history and nomenclature, marksmanship theory and practice, firearm handling and safety (which includes live firing with shotgun), basic first aid survival, hunting history, philosophy, and hunter ethics.

HPER 128 Introduction to Athletic Train 3 cr. The purpose of this course is to familiarize student with the profession of athletic training. Students will be introduced to the NATA, the NATA Code of Ethics, the certification process, continuing education, and the NATA Educational Proficiencies. Course topics include epidemiology of injuries, PPE, and program overview.

HPER 129 Athletic Training Clinical Experience I 1 cr. Students will be assigned to clinical rotation during this clinical course. The competencies and clinical integrated proficiencies for this clinical course are based on content knowledge and psychomotor skills taught in previous courses. The emphasis of this clinical course includes the content areas of acute care of injury and illness, clinical evaluation of basic injuries, prevention and health promotion which includes risk management/prevention, basic health care administration, basic psychosocial skills/knowledge, professional development and responsibility, and to a limited extent, nutrition. Evidence based practice is embedded throughout the entire curriculum. Students in the HPER 129 clinical experience will have prior experience in HPER 208 Taping and Bracing, HPER 128 Intro to Athletic Training, BIOLOGY 220 Anatomy and Physiology, and HPER 210 First Aid and CPR to build on. Students will be enrolled in HPER 207 Prevention and Care of Injuries at the time of this clinical evaluation and will be adding to the knowledge base of their injury assessment skills. Prerequisites: HPER 128, CPR Certification, and admission to Athletic Training.

HPER 131 Varsity Wrestling 1 cr. Requires active participation in varsity wrestling. Repeatable for credit.

HPER 206 Medical Conditions 3 cr. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to recognize and treat common medical conditions. Prerequisite(s): HPER 207, BIOL 220, and BIOL 221.

HPER 207 Prevention and Care of Injuries 2 cr. Provides a basic understanding of common injuries. Focus will be on the evaluation and course of treatment of the injuries presented.

HPER 208 Taping and Bracing 2 cr. Application in the techniques of taping and bracing athletic injuries. Additional Course Fee

HPER 210 First Aid and CPR 2 cr. Provides instruction in first aid, emergency care procedures, and CPR, which leads to certification by the American Red Cross. Additional Course Fee.

HPER 215 Methods of Teaching Sports Activities 2 cr. Provides instruction, practice and teaching experience in sports activities. Fundamental rules, skills, terminology and teaching strategies will be emphasized in (but not limited to) the following sports: soccer, speedball, badminton, racquetball, archery, golf, tennis, team handball, pickleball and ultimate frisbee. This course is restricted to PE majors and minors, and corporate fitness majors and coaching minors.

HPER 220 Methods of Teaching Dance 2 cr. Provides practice, instruction, and teaching experience in (but not limited to) social, folk and square dance. Emphasis will be placed on methods and techniques of teaching the rhythms of dance steps and placement of dance. This course is restricted to PE majors and minors, and corporate fitness majors.

HPER 223 Athletic Training Clinical Experience II 1 cr. Students will be assigned to clinical rotations during this clinical course. Students in the HPER 223 Clinical Experience will have prior experience in HPER 431 Kinesiology, HPER 206 Medical Conditions, and HPER 410 Advanced Athletic Injuries and Modalities, in addition to the courses lsted in the HPER 129 Clinical Experience. The competencies and clinical integrated proficiencies for this clinical course are based on content knowledge and psychomotor skills taught in previous courses. The emphasis of this clinical course includes the content areas of clinical evaluation of medical conditions and injuries, prevention and health promotion, which includes risk management/prevention, basic healthcare administration, therapeutic intervention including pharmacology and modalities. Evidence based practice is embedded through the entire curriculum. Prerequisites: HPER 129, 206, 410, and 431.

HPER 225 Fitness Leadership 2 cr. Course provides prospective corporate fitness, physical education and coaching professionals with an understanding of the fitness industry.

HPER 226 Methods of Teaching Group Fitness and Weight Training 2 cr. Provides instruction, practice, and teaching experience in group fitness and weight training. Fundamental terminology, skills and teaching techniques of the two activities will be emphasized. Students will practice developing training routines tailored to fit ability, fitness level, and desired outcomes of their future students and clients. Prerequisite(s): HPER 120 and 126.

HPER 231 Methods of Aquatic Activities 2 cr. Provides certification instruction, practice, and teaching experiences in a wide variety of aquatic games, sports, and basic swimming strokes.

HPER 250 Officiating 2 cr. The study of rules, interpretations, and techniques of officiating following the guidelines of the National Federation of State High School Activities Associations.

HPER 260 First Aid Instructor Trainer 2 cr. Provides instructor certification for American Red Cross First Aid, CPR, and Basic Life Support. Requirements are established by the American Red Cross. Prerequisite(s): HPER 210.

HPER 270 Upper/Low Extremity Evaluation 3 cr. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to perform evaluation of upper and lower extremity (UE/LE) injuries or conditions. Student's will be able to perform an observation, history, palpate, perform MMT, perform a neurological evaluation, evaluate ROM, perform special and functional tests for the UE/LE. Prerequisite(s): HPER 207, and 431, BIOL 220 and 221.

HPER 301 Psychomotor Development 2 cr. Provides an understanding of the changes that occur in motor behavior over the entire life span. Participants will have opportunities to discuss issues relating to various motor development theories and to the different influences affecting an individual's motor development. Participants will have opportunities to observe and analyze fundamental motor patterns as they are performed in various settings. Emphasis is placed on the identification of components of correct form, the detection of incorrect form, and the appropriate use of skill cues to prompt participants toward correct form.

HPER 304 Therapeutic Exercise 3 cr. The purpose of this course is to provide a background rehabilitation, healing, physics, examination, and assessment. The course will discuss techniques of therapeutic exercise, performance enhancement, and application to regions and conditions of the body. Prerequisite(s): HPER 431.

HPER 307 Head, Neck, & Spine Evaluation 3 cr. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to perform evaluation of head, neck and spine injuries or conditions. Student's will be able to perform an observation, take a history, palpate, perform MMT, perform a neurological evaluation, evaluate ROM, perform special and functional tests for the head, neck, and spine. Prerequisite(s): HPER 207, and 431, BIOL 220, and 221.

HPER 308 Biomechanics 2 cr. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to biomechanics. Course topics include terminology, the quantitative and qualitative perspective of biomechanics. The study of biomechanics in this class will involve the study of the body's architecture with the body's abilities to function in motion. Prerequisite(s): HPER 207, and 431, BIOL 220, and 221

HPER 310 Organization and Administration of PE and Athletics 2 cr. Provides a study of administration and management concepts and management responsibilities relevant to teaching and non-teaching career fields. Prerequisite(s): HPER 107.

HPER 323 Athletic Training Clinical Experience III 2 cr. Students will be assigned to clinical rotations during this clinical course. Students in HPER 323 Clincial Experience will have taken HPER 270 Upper and Lower Extremity Evaluation in addition to the required courses for HPER 129 and HPER 223 Athletic Training clincial courses. The competencies and clinical integrated proficiencies for this clinical course are based on content knowledge and psychomotor skills taught in previous courses. The emphasis of this clinical course includes the content areas of clinical evaluation of medical conditions, injuries with experience in evaluation of upper and lower extremity injuries, prevention and health promotion, which includes risk manaagement/prevention/nutrition, basic healthcare administration, and psychosocial intervention. Evidence based practice is embedded throughout the entire curriculum. Prerequisites: HPER 223 and 270.

HPER 324 Athletic Training Clinical Experience IV 2 cr. Students will be assigned to clinical rotations during this clinical course. Students in the HPER 324 clinical will have taken HPER 307 Head, Neck, and Spine Evaluation in addition to the required courses for HPER 129, 223, and HPER 323 Athletic Training clinical courses. The competencies and clinical integrated proficiences for this clinical course are based on content knowledge and psychomotor skills taught in previous courses. The emphasis of this clinical course includes the content areas of clinical evaluation of medical conditions, injuries with experience in evaluation of injuries to upper extremity, lower extremity, head, neck, and spine, in addition to the evaluation of skills students need to remain active in their implementation of therapeutic modalities through the practice of treating the entire patient and with clinical integration of skills and knowledge. Evidence based practice is a focus in this clinical with evidence based practice performing a literature search on topics of prevention and health promotion (which includes risk management/prevention/nutrition) and psychosocial intervention. Prerequisites: HPER 307 and 323.

HPER 325 Personal Training Methods 2 cr. This course is designed to provide prospective physical educators, coaches, and corporate fitness majors with instruction, practice, and teaching experience in personal training and lifestyle management coaching. Fundamental terminology, personal training skills, strategies and techniques will be emphasized. Students will practice developing personal training programs tailored to fit the ability, fitness level, and desired outcomes of prospective clients. Prerequisite(s): HPER 226

HPER 334 Nutrition for Physical Performance 2 cr. Provides information on how nutritional habits affect physical performance. An emphasis will be placed on knowledge of the six basic nutrients, food groups, calories, and energy expenditure.

HPER 340 Elementary Methods and Activities 3 cr. Provides prospective teachers with and understanding of a contemporary and reflective approach to teaching elementary physical education grades K-6. This approach to teaching is based on "Dynamic Physical Education for Elementally School Children" by Robert P. Pangrazi Ph.D. and serves as the content for the recently published National Standards for Physical Education (Moving into the Future, 1995). Participants will learn and practice a set of specific teaching behaviors and curriculum development skills, which will be most useful as beginning teachers. Peer teaching and participation in up to six field experiences in surrounding elementary schools are also a part of this class. Activities in this class will result in materials meeting many of the INTASC standards. Prerequisite(s): HPER 301 and Admission to Teacher Education. In addition, this course is a Prerequisite(s) for HPER 341 and it is highly recommended that this it also be taken prior to HPER 391.

HPER 341 Practicum for Elementary Physical Education 2 cr. Provides prospective physical education teachers with active participation in the complete process of teaching developmentally appropriate physical education to children in grades K-6. This approach to teaching is based on "Dynamic Physical Education for Elementary School Children" by Robert P. Pangrazi Ph.D. and serves as the content for national standards for physical education (Moving into the Future, 1995). Participants will receive twenty-four contact hours with children during which time they will practice and refine instructional skills first taught in HPER 340. Prerequisite(s): HPER 340 and Admission to Teacher Education.

HPER 360 Administration of School Health Programs 3 cr. The development and administration of the public school health program, with emphasis being placed on health services, healthful school living, and health instruction. Special emphasis placed on developing and administrating health instruction material for the elementary through senior high school program based upon the guidelines and recommendations of the North Dakota Department of Public Instruction.

HPER 361 Vital Health Issues 3 cr. Provides participants with an understanding of various current health topics and issues including (but not limited to) stress, mental health, intimate relationships, weight management, and substance abuse.

HPER 362 Principles and Methods of Teaching School Health 3 cr. Provides prospective teachers with an understanding of a contemporary and reflective approach to teaching health in the public schools grades K-12. This approach to teaching is based on learner-centered instructional strategies. Participants will learn and practice skills that will be most useful to them as beginning teachers such as: (a) establishing the learning environment; (b) planning appropriate and meaningful learning experiences; and (c) using effective teaching behaviors to implement the lesson plans.

HPER 391: Secondary Physical Education Methods and Practicum 4 cr. This course has two major components. First, methods coursework done at MSU which provides teaching strategies for classroom management, planning, instruction, and assessment of teacher as well as student behavior. Application of current theories of motivation are explored and applied in this course. Second, forty-five contact hours with secondary students will provide extensive opportunity to apply current practices learned in the classroom. Prerequisite(s): HPER 301, Admission to Teacher Education, and it is highly recommended that students take HPER 340 prior to enrolling in this course. Course restricted to Physical Education majors.

HPER 401 Methods of Coaching Football 2 cr. Provides techniques, skills, strategies and coaching procedures developed through classroom presentations and skill sessions.

HPER 402 Methods of Coaching Basketball 2 cr. Provides fundamental and team concepts developed through classroom and skill sessions.

HPER 403 Methods of Coaching Track 2 cr. Provides responsibilities, rules, methods and techniques of coaching track and field. Laboratory work and skill sessions.

HPER 404 Methods of Coaching Baseball/Softball 2 cr. Provides fundamental and team concepts developed through classroom presentations and skill sessions.

HPER 405 Methods of Coaching Wrestling 2 cr. Provides the requirements, responsibilities, and methods of coaching wrestling on a secondary or junior high school level. Along with classroom lecture and discussion the students will be required to observe practice sessions and matches at the local junior and senior high schools.

HPER 406 Methods of Coaching Volleyball 2 cr. Provides techniques, skills, strategies and coaching procedures developed through in-class analysis and on court skill sessions.

HPER 407 Psychology of Physical Education and Athletics 2 cr. Provides knowledge of the psychological aspects of participation in physical education fitness training and athletic events. Emphasis will be placed on the teacher/coach, student/athlete and trainer/client relationship in regard to developing communication, leadership, motivation, self-confidence, and goal setting skills. Prerequisite(s): PSY 111.

HPER 410 Advanced Athletic Injuries and Modalities 3 cr. Provides specific manual examinations involved in the evaluation of athletic injuries. Use of therapeutic modalities in the treatment of athletic injuries will also be studied. Students will take part in laboratory work in order to facilitate hands on experience. Prerequisite(s): HPER 207.

HPER 420 Athletic Training Management 2 cr. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students witht the scope and practice of managing an athletic training enviornment. Topics include organization and administration of an athletic training room, the reimbursement, policies and procedures of athletic training rooms, and the legal concerns. Prerequisite(s): HPER 207, BIOL 220 and 221.

HPER 423 Athletic Training Clinical Experience V 2 cr. Students will be assigned to clinical rotations during this clinical course. Students in the HPER 423 clinical will have taken HPER 308 Biomechanics and HPER 304 Therapeutic Excercise in addition to the required courses of HPER 129, HPER 223, HPER 323, and HPER 324. The competencies and clinical integrated proficiencies for this clinical course are based on content knowledge and psychomotor skills taught in previous courses. The emphasis of this clinical course includes the content areas of clinical evaluation of injuries with experience in clinical evaluation and acute care of medical conditions and injuries to upper extremity, lower extremity, head, neck, and spine, in addition to the evaluation of skills students need to remain active in their implementation of therapeutic modalilties as well as therapeutic exercise skills through the practice of treating the entire patient with clinical integration of skills and knowledge learned throughout the program. Prevention and health promotion continues to be a theme in HPER 423, which includes risk management, prevention of injuries, and nutrition. In addition to the courses listed, students will also have the courses listed in the HPER 129, 223, 323, and 324 Athletic Training clinical courses. Prerequisites: HPER 304, 308, and 324.

HPER 424 Athletic Training Clinical Experience VI 2 cr. Students will be assigned to clinical rotations during this clinical course. Students in the HPER 424 clinical will have taken HPER 420 Athletic Training Management in addition to the required courses for HPER 129, HPER 223, HPER 323, HPER 324, and HPER 423. The competencies and clincial integrated proficiences for this clinical course are based on content knowledge and psychomotor skills taught in previous courses. The them for this clinical course is embedded in the acute care of injuries and illness and the use of clinical integration proficiens from student content throughout their program that ensure students have the skill set and knowledge to become successful entry-level athletic trainers. In addition to the courses listed students will also have the courses listed in the HPER 129, 223, 323, 324, and 424 Athletic Training clinical courses. Prerequisites: HPER 420 and HPER 423.

HPER 425 Capstone 1 cr. The capstone course is a course designated to allow students to showcase the knowledge and research skills that they have learned while in the program. The course format is a two part format with one portion of the course devoted to allowing students to be active in creating evidence based medicine through a research project or presentation of a comprehensive literature review and the other portion devoted to preparing the athletic training student for the certification exam. The semester will start out with an introduction of the expectations for research presentations. Students will select a research topic that provides an opportunity for scholarly work. The topics will be selected by the students at the onset of the semester to allow ample opportunities for obtaining information for a presentation. The capstone presentations will be presented in an open forum format or presented at the North Dakoota Athletic Trainer's Association's annual meeting. The next portion of the course will provide students with study techniques and practice exams to prepare them for the BOC, Inc. certification exam. Instructors, prior students, and outside guests will be invited to speak to the students on athletic training topics. Prerequisites: HPER 423 and senior status.

HPER 431 Kinesiology 3 cr. Provides study of joint movements and muscle action as related to physical activities. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 115 or 220, and/or 221.

HPER 433 Physiology of Exercise 3 cr. Provides a comprehensive study of the physiological effect of muscular exercise and training upon the organs and systems of the body. Prerequisite(s): HPER 431.

HPER 441 Evaluation of Psychomotor Performance 3 cr. Designed to provide the corporate fitness and physical education major with an understanding of contemporary methods used to measure and evaluate psychomotor skills and performance. Emphasis will be placed on learning and practicing techniques necessary for proper evaluation of health and performance related to physical fitness and selected sports skills.

HPER 442 Methods of Teaching Physical Education to the Disabled 2 cr. Provides practical methods and teaching applications that can be used in a mainstreamed or adapted group games, dance, and individual and dual sports. Prerequisite(s): HPER 215.

HPER 496 Coaching Activities Practicum 2 cr. Coaching minors work with experienced coaches in the field to gain practical experience in a field setting. All practicums arranged by the department.

HPER 497 Corporate Fitness Practicum 2-8 cr. 160 hours of practicum experience at two sites in a recreation, wellness, fitness, or athletic performance setting. Restricted to junior and senior corporate fitness majors. All HPER courses for the major must be completed.

History

The following category codes identify which courses may be taken to meet the chronological and distributed history requirements specified for program electives. Each individual course may be used to meet only one requirement.

HIST 101 Western Civilization I 3 cr. (GE2) A survey of the political, intellectual, social and economic trends of Western Civilization from the Classical Age to the French Revolution. C1

HIST 102 Western Civilization II 3 cr. (GE2) A survey of the political, intellectual, social, and economic trends of western civilization from the French Revolution to the present. C2

HIST 103 U.S. History to 1877 3 cr. (GE2) Survey of U.S. history from Colonial period to end of Reconstruction. C1

HIST 104 U.S. History from 1877 3 cr. (GE2) Survey of U.S. history from end of Reconstruction to present. C2

HIST 203 Modernization of Early America 3 cr. This course will introduce students to the major developments in American social, intellectual, and cultural history from discovery through the Civil War. The focus of the course will be on the concept of modernization; why, when and how was life in America evolving toward those characteristics we consider part of modern life? Central topics will include cultural interaction, daily life, the development of a new society, American exceptionalism, the evolution of American intellectual thought, democratization, social movements, and the development of an American literature. US/T

HIST 206 Islam and the Muslim World 3 cr. (Diversity) This course introduces students to the history and culture of the wider Muslim world. In this course we will study three aspects of Islam and the Muslim World: Islam as a religion, the 1,400 year history of Muslim Civilizations in all its diversity, and finally, Islam today. NW/T

HIST 211 World Civilizations To 1500 3 cr. (GE2-Diversity) World civilizations begin with earliest histories of organized human life in China, India, Africa, and Mesopotamia and end with Europe's emergence from the Middle Ages around 1500.

HIST 212 World Civilizations since 1500 3 cr. (GE2-Diversity) This course surveys non-Western History between 1500 and the present. It focuses on the continents of Asia, Africa and Latin America, examining these continents' cultures and histories from their own perspectives. Special emphases will be placed on religion, organization of societies, continuity and discontinuity of cultures, interaction with Europe and North America, colonialism, and global exchange.

HIST 215H Modern World Origins 3 cr. (GE2-Diversity) A seminar in the origins of the modern world. Class time will emphasize student discussion of assigned relevant historical sources, both primary and secondary. In addition, there will be extensive and varied writing assignments. Honors Program admission of 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of the instructor is required.

HIST 219 Environmental History 3 cr. This course is an introduction to the field of Environmental History. It will explore the relationship between people, communities, resources and the environment in the past and will study examples from the U.S., Europe, and other parts of the world. Students will use secondary literature and primary-source case studies to study major environmental themes related to conservation, resource management, land use, development, water, and pollution. Upon completion students will demonstrate understanding of the scope and depth of environmental issues in world history, of the methods historians have developed to approach such questions, and of major case studies related to rural and urban experiences. T

HIST 220 North Dakota History 3 cr. Survey of the trends and problems in the State of North Dakota and their relations to the upper Mississippi Valley area, from Indian heritage to the present. US/T

HIST 227 History of Vietnam 3 cr. This course surveys the history of Vietnam from its formation to the late twentieth century. Topics covered include Vietnam's cultural and historical origins, its place in South-East Asia, colonization under the French, the experience of WWII, the French and American Wars in Vietnam, and Vietnam since the 1970s. NW/C1/C2

HIST 230 Test Preparation 1 cr. This course is designed to help students acress the Minot State University campus who plan to take exams needed in order to complete major/minor requirements and/or for students struggling with these types of exams. The class is aimed primarily at education majors who are required to take the Principles in Learning and Teaching and the Praxis exams. It is open to all students who have or will take these kinds of exams.

HIST 231 Latin American History Survey 3 cr. (Diversity) Survey of the countries below the Rio Grande from pre-Colombian times to the present. Special attention to continuity of Native American cultures, colonial legacies, identity, gender roles, revolutions, relations with the U.S., and land and income distribution. NW/T

HIST 240 African History Survey 3 cr. (Diversity) Africa has a wide variety of cultures and peoples. In this survey, we will study civilizations in as different areas as the Egyptian Nile, the Malian savanna, the Congolian rainforest, and East Coast Swahili traders. Topics include: ancient Egypt, Islam, European colonialism and its consequences, apartheid, women, and kinship. NW/T

HIST 241 Renaissance and Reformation 3 cr. An in-depth study of the important themes, both secular and religious, of the Renaissance and Reformation eras. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. EU/C1

HIST 248 Medieval History 3 cr. The study of Europe, East and West, from the break-up of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance (1500) EU/C1

HIST 251 Introduction to Public History 3 cr. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to public history, which is often simply defined as the practice of history outside of the classroom, produced for a non-academic audience. This simple definition belies complicated fundamental issues, such as what role the public audience does and should play in the determination of what issues are of historical concern, and how they should be handled. Starting with consideration of what public history is, and what are its purposes and basic questions, the class will then work on developing some of the basic skills that public historians need. Students will speak with and, in some cases, shadow current professionals in the field. They will be introduced to sources of historical information available in the local community and organizations of value to public historians. Ultimately, students will utilize the ideas and skills that they develop during the semester as they undertake a local historical research project that will culminate in a public presentation. T/C2

HIST 261 American Indian History 3 cr. (Diversity) A survey of American Indian history from pre-contact to the present, providing an overview of major trends and developments. US/T

HIST 280 Practice and Method 3 cr. This colloquium introduces students to the tools, research and writing methods, resources and theoretical approaches required in upper level history courses. It includes a small student-initiated research project that will allow students to refine their skills. The course also features discussion of readings that illustrate a wide variety of historical approaches and methods. To be taken upon declaring a major in history or social science. Course restricted to History, History Education, Social Science, Social Science Education major or minor. (Offered spring semester only.)

HIST 299 Special Topics in History 1-8 cr. This is a flexible course that may be taught depending on student needs. The design of the course is to present the student an opportunity to concentrate on various topics. Prerequisite(s) may apply. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

HIST 315 History of American Women 3 cr. (Diversity) The experience of women in American history, with emphasis upon the continual change in woman's role and differences brought about by region, ethnicity, and economic class. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. US/T

HIST 319 Colonial America 3 cr. Traces the development of the colonies from the time of European exploration and early English colonization to the confrontations between Britain and America in the 1760s and 1770s. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. US/C1

HIST 320 The Early Republic 3 cr. Study of the social, intellectual, political, and diplomatic forces, issues, and personalities in America's formative (1781-1824) years. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. US/C1

HIST 325 Sectionalism and the Civil War 3 cr. Traces the rise of sectionalism as a force in antebellum America leading to the Civil War. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. US/C1

HIST 328 The Transformation of America 3 cr. Study of industrialization, urbanization, and immigration in America from 1865 to 1901, focusing on the social, political, and international consequences of and reaction to economic change. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. US/C1

HIST 336 African American History 3 cr. (Diversity) Examines the history of African Americans in American society from 1619 to the present, including the West African cultural context, cultural retentions and changes in the American environment, and the emergence of cohesive African American culture. The course pays special attention to the ideas, contributions, and changing roles of African Americans with American society, economy, culture, and politics. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. US/T

HIST 337 Imperialism in Asia 3 cr. (Diversity) Models of western imperialism will be contrasted with those developed by Japan and China to develop a comparative study of political, cultural, and social developments in Japan, Indochina, China, and other Asian countries. Recent trends and relationships with the West will be emphasized. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. NW/C2

HIST 338 History of South Africa 3 cr. South Africa is one of the most beautiful countries in the world, with fascinating historical developments. It is ethnically very diverse, combining African, European, and Asian populations. Today it is trying to forge a new identity as a recently democratic country. The course will examine cultural, political, social, and economic developments from pre-colonial times to the present. Some topics are: Zulu Wars, Cecil Rhodes' diamonds, the Great Trek, the Boer War, ANC, Apartheid, race relations, and the Truth and Reconciliation Committee. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. NW/T

HIST 342 The Age of The Vikings 3 cr. This course is designed to provide an intensive look at the Scandinavian peoples of Europe in the central Middle Ages. Although traditional medieval history courses consider the Viking, Magyar, and Muslim invasions of the eighth and ninth centuries (beginning c. 750 CE), conventional courses tend to overlook the Scandinavian countries themselves and their culture. Thus, in this course we will examine Scandinavian origins in addition to their political, religious, and cultural backgrounds. This will require a look at the history of Scandinavia long before and after the traditional period of invasions. The greatest percentage of the readings, however, will focus on the period of Scandinavian expansion and invasion. Finally, we will consider the conversion of the Scandinavian peoples to Christianity and the assimilation of these peoples into the political order of Europe during the later medieval period. For this examination we will rely on primary source documents, archaeology, literary studies, and insights from other fields of research. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. EU/C1

HIST 343 The Medieval Church 3 cr. This course is designed to provide an intensive look at the church and Christendom during the Middle Ages. Although students typically learn about the medieval church, medieval church structure, and medieval church figures in classes on the Middle Ages, conventional courses tend to focus on the political, social, and cultural aspects of the period. This course is therefore designed to provide a deeper look at the medieval church, including its beginnings in Roman Empire, its maturation in the high medieval period, and its eventual decline on the eve of the Reformation. In addition to examining the church itself, this course considers the various components of Christendom, including but not limited to the Church Fathers, monasticism, the papacy, the laity, interactions with princes and rulers, and the crusades. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. EU/C1

HIST 347 The Making of Modern Europe 3 cr. A thematic study of Europe during the age of the industrial and social revolution, 1815-1945. This course compares major social and cultural trends across a variety of European nations. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. EU HIST 350 Europe in 20th Century 3 cr. A detailed consideration of the main political, intellectual, social and economic trends of 20th century Europe. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. EU/C2

HIST 351 The Mediterranean World 3 cr. Survey of the major classical civilizations of Greece and Rome from their inception to their decline. In examining these larger civiliations, this course also takes into consideration smaller peripheral states (such as the Phoenicians) located along the shores of the Mediterranean Sea, as well as the Arabic states (the Persians and the Sassanids) that were often in conflict with both the Greeks and the Romans. Although this class focuses on the classical period, it will also examine the developments of late antiquity (such as Christianity and Islam), whic occurred in the former empires of the Greeks and Romans. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of the instructor.

HIST 352 Medieval & Early Modern Women 3 cr. Survey of early modern women. To conduct this survey it is first necessary to examine the ancestors of medieval women. This class thus begins by looking at Roman women and their "barbarian" counterparts, the women of the frontier. Focus is then turned to early medieval women, who were an amalgamation of Roman and "barbarian" traditions. In the second half of the class, the many opportunities for women in the high and later Middle Ages are examined. The course is finished by looking at the restrictions placed on women during the periods of the Renaissance and Reformation. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of the instructor.

HIST 363 Atlantic History 3 cr. Globalization is not a recent phenomenon. As early as the 15th century, Africans, Americans, and Europeans exchanged ideas, goods, animals, plants, diseases, and people on an ever increasing scale. In this course we will study the various levels of interactions between Africans, Americans, and Europeans between about 1400 and 1800 on the four inhabited continents bordering the Atlantic Ocean. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. T/C1

HIST 365 Peoples and Cultures of Native North America 3 cr. This course surveys the major culture areas of North America prior to contact with Europeans. In each region particular attention is given to one group or nation to highlight cultural adaptations and developments. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. US/T

HIST 380 History of Mexico 3 cr. Mexico and the U.S. are entering into an ever closer relationship, but their histories are quite different. This survey outlines the Mexican past from pre-Colombian to modern times. We will focus on one area (the Andes or Meso America) and study a wide variety of topics such as: conquest, colonialism, religion, gender, protests, and ecology. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. NW/T

HIST 385 History of Brazil 3 cr. Brazil is more than carnaval alone, but that is a fundamental aspect of the largest South American society. In this course, we will examine Brazilian history and society from a wide variety of angles. The country is very diverse: from the Amazon rainforest where native peoples still live in isolation, to the Sao Paulo metropolitan area that can compete with any Western country as to modernity and industrial development. Brazil is a country full of contrasts: optimistic but sad, dancing sambas but violent. In the course we will examine Brazil's past and how this contributed to the country's present social, economic, political, and cultural situation. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. NW/T

HIST 392 Experimental Course in History 3 cr. This is an experimental course that may be taught depending on department needs. The design of the course is to allow the instructor to test and assess content and methodology that may become a permanent part of a department's course listings. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor.

HIST 399 Readings in History 1-3 cr. Study and discussion of readings in history. Specific topic will be arranged with the instructor. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. Repeatable for credit.

HIST 401 Historiography 3 cr. A course to consider both the philosophy or theory of history as well as the mechanics of "doing" history. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. (Offered fall semester only.)

HIST 410 Trans-Mississippi West 3 cr. An in-depth look at the impact of this region on the development and growth of America. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. US/T

HIST 415 20th Century America 3 cr. A seminar focusing on a particular theme or time period of 20th century American history. A specific focus will be selected each time the course is offered. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. T/C2

HIST 420 Indian Peoples of the Great Plains 3 cr. Study of the culture and history of the Indian Peoples of the Great Plains. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. US/T

HIST 430 Native American Social History 3 cr. Seminar examining the different social experiences of Native peoples in North America. Topics include, among others, historical demography, gender, intercultural relations, migration, and urbanization. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. US/T

HIST 434 History and Multimedia 1-3 cr. This course is designed to teach students to transform the content of a traditional seminar paper into a variety of multimedia formats. It introduces students to current digital tools, explores design issues and organizational strategies, and considers how to design presentations for varied audiences such as museums, children and schools, internet users, portable device users, and senior populations. No technical background is required, although students will need to have completed a 300 or 400 level history research paper to use as the raw material for this course, or they must co-enroll in a 300 or 400 level history class that requires such a paper. T

HIST 435 Latin American History Seminar 3 cr. A seminar focusing on a particular aspect of the history of the Latin American societies. Topics for focus may vary from Amerinaian societies, gender, environmental history, social-economic situation, and relations with the U.S. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. NW/T

HIST 440 Slavery in the Americas 3 cr. North and South America have different experiences with slavery. In this course we will compare and contrast the African impact on both continents, especially in Brazil and the United States. Some topics that we will study are: the slave trades, runaway slave societies, the Haitian revolution, African religions, race relations, gender roles, families, and the meanings of freedom. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. NW/US

HIST 442 The Crusades 3 cr. This course surveys the period of the "Crusades" from its inception in the late eleventh century, to its maturity in the twelfth and thirteenth century, and through its final demise in the later Middle Ages. The examination of the development of the idea of crusade throughout these periods proves crucial to understanding the Crusades themselves, as the idea of crusade changed dramatically during each period. In this course we will exam each of these periods carefully, taking into consideration the various developments in the idea of crusade. We will also consider the impact that the Crusades have had on modern events. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. EU/C1

HIST 460 Modern France and Francophone Society 3 cr. An in-depth seminar on the major themes of modern French history from 1750 to the present. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. EU/C2

HIST 491 History Seminar 3 cr. An advanced seminar in history with a major paper requirement. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor.

HIST 497 Internship 1-6 cr. Placement in applied public history setting for practical experience. Prerequisite(s): HIST 280 and consent of instructor. Repeatable for credit

HIST 499 Special Topics in History 1-8 cr. This is a flexible course that may be taught depending on student needs. The design of the course is to present the student an opportunity to concentrate on various topics. Prerequisite(s) may apply. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

Honors Program

HON 191H The Honors Community 1 cr. This course introduces students to the MSU Honors Program. Informal conversations with MSU faculty, administrators, honors students, staff, and community leaders will familiarize students with the university, the community, the honors approach to learning, and the importance of critical thinking and global perspective. Practical orientation to campus resources included. Honors Program admission is required.

HON 251H Culinary Arts & Entertaining 1 cr. A hands-on cuisine from a particular geographical region of the world. Readings on historical, social, economic, and artistic aspects of the relevant culture that pertain to the culinary arts. Applied lessons in menu planning, table setting, and food preparation/presentation. Additional course fee covers food costs. Prerequisite(s): Honors Program admission or GPA of 3.30 and permission of instructor.

HON 252H Visionaries of the Past 2 cr. A thematically organized survey of "Great Works" by noted authors and artists. Literature, art, theatre, film, and music will be included. These works have demonstrated enduring relevance, significant historical or social impact, and/or recognized aesthetic value. Broad themes in any given semester might include, for example, utopia/dystopia, human justice, social conflict, etc. Prerequisite(s): Honors Program admission or permission of instructor.

HON 254H Information in the Digital Age 2 cr. This course cultivates the skills needed to define, find, evaluate, select, use, and communicate information responsibly in the 21st century. Emphasis on hands-on application of knowledge. Prerequisite(s): Honors Program Admission or a cumulative GPA of 3.30 and instructor consent.

HON 264H Thinking Outside the Box 3 cr. A seminar that emphasizes the practice of intellectual inquiry, innovative pedagogies, and/or interdisciplinary connections. The class will rotate between academic colleges and departments. Prerequisite(s): Honors Program Admission or 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of instructor. Repeatable for credit.

HON 351H Integrity & the Examined Life 3 cr. Seminar exploration on the theme of introspection and reflection, based on selected "Great Works" which either address the theme or are autobiographical in nature. The course will explore elements of human identity and concepts of the "self." Emphasis on reflective writing. Prerequisite(s): Honors Program admission or permission of instructor.

HON 391H Community Problem-Solving 3 cr. A seminar in civic engagement. Students will work with a community leader or community agency to identify, understand, and formulate solutions to complex, real-life community challenges. Emphasis on political empowerment, collaborative work with diverse constituencies, research, data analysis, and problem-solving. Prerequisite(s): Honors Programs admission or 3.30 cumulative GPA and instructor consent.

HON 395H Global Citizenship and Service 3 cr. (Diversity) An interdisciplinary exploration of community-building, social justice, and human liberation which engages students directly in meaningful community service. Study of history, theory, and the local/global realities of community-building; reflection upon characteristics of a just society, individual responsibility, and potential leadership roles. Prerequisites: Honors Program admission or a cumulative GPA of 3.30 and instructor consent.

HON 450H Project & Portfolio Design 1 cr. A seminar for the development of the senior project. Students will preview the research literature, develop a comprehensive project proposal, and review how to evaluate and incorporate relevant scholarly source material. Students will also compile a comprehensive portfolio of honors work for graduation. Prerequisite(s): Honors Program admission.

HON 451H Senior Essay and Seminar 3 cr. Research and/or creative project undertaken during the senior year, under the direction of the Honors Director and a faculty advisor. Emphasis on the deliberate and scholarly process of independent research and writing. Students will produce a polished written thesis (bound and archived) and present the project in a public forum. Prerequisite(s): Honors Program admission.

Humanities

HUM 194 Independent Study 1-3 cr. Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of humanities. Repeatable for credit.

HUM 210 Research Strategies 2 cr. Both practical and theoretical in scope, this class is designed to help students become full participants in our Information Society. This class uses a mixture of lecture, in class discussion, hands on assignments, and a written research project to give the student the technical skills and critical thinking abilities they need to use the printed and electronic information resources found in libraries and on the Internet.

HUM 251 Humanities 3 cr. (GE3) Integrated course in art, literature, and music from the Stone Ages through the Early Middle Ages.

HUM 252 Humanities 3 cr. (GE3) Integrated course in art, literature, and music from the Gothic Period through the Seventeenth Century.

HUM 253 Humanities 3 cr. (GE3) Integrated course in art, literature, and music from the Eighteenth Century to the Modern Era.

HUM 254 Non-Western Humanities 3 cr. (GE3) An integrated survey of the art, literature, philosophy, and history of a particular non-western culture. The specific culture studied from year to year will vary but could rotate among Japanese, African, pre-Columbian American, Chinese, or Indian. May be repeated for credit.

HUM 296 Study Tour 1-3 cr. MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. Does not count towards the humanities minor. Repeatable for credit.

HUM 394 Independent Study 1-3 cr. Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of humanities. Repeatable for credit.

HUM 399 Special Topics 1-3 cr. Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of humanities. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

HUM 496 Study Tour 1-6 cr. MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. The course requirements will include additional requirements beyond the travel itself and may be repeated for credit.

HUM 299/499 Special Topics 1-3 cr. Topics are variable. Offerings include visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics. Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor. Repeatable for credit as topics change.