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Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions A - D

Accounting
Arabic
Art
Business Administration
Biology
Business Information Technology
Chemistry
Communication Arts/Broadcasting
Communication Disorders
Computer Science
Criminal Justice
Driver Traffic Safety

Accounting

ACCT 102 Fundamentals of Accounting 3 cr. A basic study of the accounting cycle for a sole proprietorship business.

ACCT 200 Elements of Accounting I 3 cr. Basic principles of the complete accounting cycle with emphasis on current assets; property, plant, and equipment; and current liabilities. Prerequisite: MATH 103 or higher.

ACCT 201 Elements of Accounting II 3 cr. A continuation course of ACCT 200 with emphasis on partnerships, corporations, and management accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT 200.

ACCT 300 Legal Environment of Business 3 cr. Includes the nature and function of law; contracts and private property as basic concepts in free enterprise; the legal system and evolution of attitudes and law regarding marketing functions and governmental regulation imposed on business activities. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or higher.

ACCT 301 Intermediate Accounting I 3 cr. Begins with a review of the accounting process and the conceptual framework underlying financial accounting. It proceeds to an in-depth study of cash, time value of money, receivables, and inventory. Prerequisites: ACCT 201 and BOTE 247.

ACCT 302 Intermediate Accounting II 3 cr. Continues the intermediate sequence with in-depth coverage of operational assets (tangible and intangible), liabilities (current and long-term), stockholder's equity, and investments. Prerequisite: ACCT 301.

ACCT 303 Intermediate Accounting III 3 cr. Concludes the intermediate sequence with in-depth coverage of the statement of cash flows, pensions and post retirement benefits, leases, earnings per share, financial statement analysis, accounting for income taxes, accounting changes and error analysis, revenue recognition, and financial reporting. Prerequisite: ACCT 302.

ACCT 315 Government/Non-Profit Accounting 3 cr. Covers accounting principles for state and local governmental units, universities, hospitals, and other not-for-profit organizations. Topics include budgetary accounting, the preparation of reports and statements, and the use of special funds. Prerequisite: ACCT 301.

ACCT 321 Managerial Accounting 3 cr. Emphasizes structuring and analyzing accounting data for management decisions related to manufacturing, merchandising, and service entities. Prerequisite: ACCT 201. Co-requisite: BADM 301.

ACCT 322 Advanced Managerial Accounting 3 cr. Addresses cost allocation, inventory methods and concepts, process and activity based costing systems, standard costing, and performance measures. Prerequisite: ACCT 321.

ACCT 330 International Business Law 3 cr. Provides a study of four major topics: 1) international sales contracts subject to the UN Convention for Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG); 2) North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA); 3) General Agreement on Trade and Tariffs (GATT); and 4) remedies/enforcement of the international sales contract. Prerequisite: ACCT 300.

ACCT 331 Business Law I 3 cr. Topics include contracts (formation, performance, rights, and remedies), negotiable instruments, and legal matters relating to the financial/ banking community. Prerequisite: Junior or senior status.

ACCT 332 Business Law II 3 cr. Topics include Uniform Commercial Code (Art.2, sales contracts), Uniform Commercial Code (Art. 9, secured transactions), employment/agency law. Prerequisite: ACCT 331.

ACCT 351 Introduction to Fraud Examination 3 cr. This course is designed to provide the student with an introduction to the skills necessary to detect, investigate and prevent fraud, and white-collar crime. The material covered in this course should be of interest to accountants, auditors, fraud investigators, loss prevention specialists, attorneys, educators, criminologists, or business owners/managers. The purpose of this course is to: (1) educate the student about both the pervasiveness of and the causes of fraud and white-collar crime in our society, (2) explore the methods of fraud detection, investigation, and prevention, and (3) increase the student's ability to detect material financial statement fraud. Prerequisite: ACCT 102 or ACCT 200.

ACCT 360 Accounting Information Systems 3 cr. Emphasizes how accounting information systems function in today's business environment. Manual and computer systems will be used to study the processes and procedures by which an organization's financial information is accumulated, classified, processed, analyzed, and communicated. Topics include business cycles, controls, integrated accounting software, spreadsheets, and relational databases. Prerequisites: ACCT 201, BOTE 247.

ACCT 401 Advanced Accounting I 3 cr. Addresses issues related to business combinations and consolidated financial statements as well as a partnership accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT 302.

ACCT 402 Advanced Accounting II 3 cr. Addresses accounting for foreign operations, segment reporting, home/branch accounting, interim financial reporting, accounting for estates/trusts, corporate reorganizations/liquidations. Prerequisite: ACCT 302.

ACCT 411 Taxation of Individuals 3 cr. Provides a study of federal taxation principles and theories relating to individuals with emphasis on the determination of gross income and taxable income. Taxation of self-employment income and property transactions will be covered. Compliance under AICPA Standards for Tax Service, AICPA Code of Professional Conduct, and preparer penalties are discussed. Students apply these principles by preparing federal income tax returns, and by performing research, and tax planning. Prerequisite: ACCT 201.

ACCT 412 Taxation of Business Entities 3 cr. Provides a study of federal taxation principles and theories relating to corporations, partnerships, and estates and trusts. Students will apply these principles by preparing various types of federal income tax returns and by performing tax research and tax planning. Consolidation tax returns, gift tax returns, and foreign related transactions will be introduced. Prerequisite: ACCT 411.

ACCT 415 Energy Law 3 cr. Energy law is an ever-changing discipline that emphasized how both individuals and businesses interact with the law related to the energy industry on a day-to-day basis. This course will focus on the relationships between energy corporations and the individual land owner or service provider as well as the relationships between environmental laws and production. Prerequisite: ACCT 300

ACCT 430 Auditing/Assurance Concepts 3 cr. Introduces audit theory, standards, responsibilities, and processes. Coverage include auditing engagement standards, ethical and legal responsibilities, quality control, fraud, internal control evaluation, audit approaches, and audit reporting. The course concludes with a discussion of compilations, reviews, examinations and other assurance services. Prerequisite: ACCT 302.

ACCT 431 Auditing/Assurance Practices 3 cr. Focuses on auditing procedures: audit sampling, risk analysis, testing specific balance sheet accounts and determining the effectiveness of key business cycles. The course begins with accepting clients and concludes with the final audit steps. An audit case is an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: ACCT 430 and MATH 240.

ACCT 480 Controllership 3 cr. Examines the role of controller as a vital member of an organization's management team. Students exercise judgment in solving accounting-related problems by synthesizing and applying knowledge gained from previous business coursework. Focus will be placed on cost management, budgeting, organizational behavior, ethics, cash management, policy-making, internal control, performance measurement, compensation and benefits, accounting information systems, and tax compliance. Prerequisites: College of Business Core, ACCT 326, ACCT 430 and senior status or higher.

ACCT 497 Accounting Internship 2-12 cr. Refers to supervised professional experience in public, industrial, governmental, or non-profit accounting. Students must meet standards set by both the employer and the Accounting Program. A maximum of 2 credits count toward the major with the remaining credits counting as electives. This course is restricted to accounting majors. Consent of program coordinator required. Grading Basis: S/U. Repeatable for credit.

ACCT 499 Special Topics. Topics are variable. Offerings include visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offering and current topics. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

Arabic

ARB 101 Beginning Arabic I 4 cr. (GE3) For beginners or those entering with one or two years of high school Arabic. Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture.

ARB 102 Beginning Arabic II 4 cr. (GE3) A continuation of Beginning Arabic I. Prerequisite: ARB 101.

ARB 201 Intermediate Arabic I 4 cr. (GE3) Review of basic Arabic with increased practice in conversation, reading and writing. Prerequisite: ARB 102, three years of high school Arabic, or consent of instructor.

ARB 202 Intermediate Arabic II 4 cr. (GE3) Continuation of Arabic 201. Prerequisite: ARB 201.

ARB 220 Arabic Film 3 cr. An exploration of socio-cultural, historical, and political issues in non-mainstream Arab cinema. Supplementary readings in English translation. Films projected in Arabic, with English subtitles. Taught in English.

ARB 299 Special Topics 3 cr. Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of Arabic. Repeatable for credit as topics change. Taught in English

ARB 340 Conversation & Composition I 3 cr. Advanced practice in oral and written skills using cultural reading and other media. Prerequisite(s): ARB 202 or consent of instructor

ARB 341 Conversation & Composition II 3 cr. Advanced practice in oral skills using cultural reading and other media. Prerequisite: ARB 202 or consent of instructor

ARB 342 Intro to Arabic Literature 3 cr. Designed to improve language skills with an emphasis on reading and enhance the students' ability to understand Arabic literature. Includes study of poetry, drama, and narrative form Arabic speaking countries. Prerequisite: ARB 202.

ARB 343 Arabic Culture 3 cr. Readings in culture and society of the Arab world. Prerequisite: ARB 340 or consent of instructor.

ARB 394 Independent Studies 1-3 cr. Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of Arabic. Arabic majors or minors only. Prerequisite: ARB 342.

ARB 402 Genres 3 cr. Study of a major genre or period in Arabic Literature. Topic varies from year to year. Prerequisite: ARB 343.

ARB 450 Senior Capstone in Arabic 3 cr. Individual research project on a cultural topic approved by the instructor one semester prior to enrollment in the course. Restricted to Arabic majors.

ARB 496 Study Tour 1-6 cr. MSU faculty led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself.

ARB 499 Special Topics 3 cr. Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of Arabic. Repeatable for credit as topics change. Prerequisite: ARB 340 or consent of instructor.

Art

ART 101 Introduction to Studio Art 3 cr. (GE4) An introductory studio art course designed to familiarize the non-art major with basic painting, printmaking, sculptural, jewelry, and ceramic processes.

ART 110 Introduction to Visual Arts 3 cr. (GE3) Study and appreciation of visual arts. Three hour lecture.

ART 112 Computer Graphics 3 cr. (GE4) An introduction to the computer as it applies to page layout, digital imaging, and the visual arts. Six studio hours per week.

ART 122 Two-Dimensional Design 3 cr. (GE4) A basic course in the study of two-dimensional design for the studio artist. Six studio hours per week.

ART 123 Color Theory 3 cr. Study of color properties and structural devices and their contribution to visual organization. Six studio hours per week.

ART 124 Three-Dimensional Design 3 cr. A basic course in the study of three-dimensional design for the studio artist. Six studio hours per week.

ART 130 Drawing I 3 cr. Introduction to basic drawing techniques through a variety of materials. Six studio hours per week.

ART 140 Crafts I 3 cr. (GE4) Introduction to basic crafts. Six studio hours per week.

ART 191 Visual Arts Seminar I .5 cr. Introduction of departmental requirements, procedures and opportunities. Restricted to Art and Art Ed majors and minors. Repeatable for credit up to 1 cr.

ART 201 Art Methods for Elementary Education 3 cr. Methods of teaching art in elementary education. Six studio hours per week. This course is repeatable a maximum of two times.

ART 204 Jewelry I 3 cr. (GE4) Introduction to basic jewelry techniques, design, and materials. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 124 or consent of instructor.

ART 207 Digital Tools: Imaging & Print 3 cr. An exploration of Adobe's Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign. Covers software programs and peripherals designed for imaging and print, building basic skills and knowledge of computer programs. Prerequisite: ART 112 or consent of instructor.

ART 208 Digital Tools: Interactive Web 2 cr. Covers software, programs and peripherals designed for interactivity on Web, building basic skills and knowledge of art related computer programs. Meets four hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 207 or consent of instructor.

ART 209 Digital Tools: Motion 2 cr. Covers software, programs and peripherals designed for motion and time-based art, building basic skills and knowledge of art related computer programs. Meets four hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 207 or consent of instructor.

ART 210 Art History I 3 cr. (GE3-Diversity) A survey of western art from Paleolithic to Renaissance.

ART 211 Art History II 3 cr. (GE3) A survey of western art from Renaissance to present.

ART 212 Non-Western Art History 3 cr. An integrated survey of the art of non-western cultures.

ART 213 Graphic Design I 3 cr. Introduction to the elements and practice of typography with emphasis on typefaces and letterforms in graphic design. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite(s): ART 207, 122, 123, 130 or consent of instructor.

ART 214 Graphic Design II 3 cr. Application of problem solving skills for visual communications as applied to the history of graphic design. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 213 or consent of instructor.

ART 220 Painting I 3 cr. Introduction to basic painting through a variety of materials. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 122, 123, 130 or consent of instructor.

ART 225 Water Media I 3 cr. Introduction to basic water-media painting for the studio artist. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 122, 123, 130 or consent of instructor.

ART 231 Figure Drawing I 3 cr. Introduction to basic figure drawing. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 122, 130 or consent of instructor.

ART 250 Ceramics I 3 cr. (GE4) Introduction to basic ceramic techniques. Six studio hours per week.

ART 265 Sculpture I 3 cr. Introduction to basic sculpture materials and techniques. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 122, 123, 124 or consent of instructor.

ART 266 Sculpture II 3 cr. Continuation of ART 265. Four studio hours per week. Emphasis on independent development of technique and style. Prerequisite: ART 265 or consent of instructor.

ART 270 Printmaking I 3 cr. Introduction to basic printmaking techniques and materials. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 122, 123 and 130 or consent of instructor.

ART 271 Printmaking II 3 cr. Basic experiences in intaglio printing techniques with emphasis upon imaginative expression in these media. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 123 and 130 or consent of instructor and entry level specialization and 100 level core foundation.

ART 280 Photography I 3 cr. (GE4) Introduction to basic photography. Six studio hours per week.

ART 281 Digital Photography 3 cr. Course will encourage exploration and production in digital imaging techniques. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 280 or consent of instructor.

ART 291 Visual Arts Seminar II .5 cr. A continuation of VA Seminar, including second year portfolio reviews. Restricted to Art and Art Ed majors and minors. Prerequisite: Art 191 or consent of instructor. Repeatable for credit up to 1 cr.

ART 296 Study Tour 1-3 cr. MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit up to 16 cr. Restricted to students with Freshman or Sophomore status. Grading Basis S/U.

ART 299 Special Topics 1-3 cr. Topics are variable. Offerings include visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

ART 310 Modernism 3 cr. A study of modernism in art.

ART 311 Postmodernism 3 cr. A study of Postmodernism in art.

ART 312 History of Architecture 3 cr. A survey of architectural history from prehistory to the present.

ART 313 Women in the Visual Arts 3 cr. A study of the impact of women in the visual arts throughout history.

ART 315 Native American Art 3 cr. (Diversity) Art and crafts of the indigenous people of the Americas through a study of the artifacts and contemporary work.

ART 322 Graphic Design III 3 cr. An advanced exploration of graphic design in the contemporary digital environment, culminating in the execution of a professional portfolio. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 214 or consent of instructor.

ART 323 Illustration Techniques 3 cr. Introduction to materials, techniques, and problem solving skills used in illustration. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 122, 123 and 130 or consent of instructor.

ART 325 Water Media II 3 cr. Continuation of ART 225 with renewed emphasis on development of an individualized technique, style, and concept though acrylic as well as transparent watercolor. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 123 and 225 or consent of instructor.

ART 331 Advanced Drawing 3 cr. Advanced problems in drawing including still-life, figure drawing, group composition, and style. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 122, 123, 130, and 231 or consent of instructor.

ART 333 Painting II 3 cr. Continuation of ART 220 with emphasis on independent development of technique, composition, and style. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 220 or consent of instructor.

ART 334 Painting III 3 cr. Continuation of ART 333. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 333 or consent of instructor.

ART 351 Ceramics II 3 cr. Advanced development of the individual ceramist in studio experience related to clay bodies, glazes, and firing procedures. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 250 or consent of instructor and entry level specialization and 100 level core foundation.

ART 352 Ceramics III 3 cr. Continuation of ART 351. six studio hours per week. Emphasis on independent development of the technique and style. Prerequisites: ART 250 and 351.

ART 362 Printmaking III 3 cr. Continuation of 270 and 361 with emphasis on independent development of technique, composition, and style. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 270 or 361 or consent of instructor and entry level specialization and 100 level core foundation.

ART 380 Advanced Photography 3 cr. Advanced exploration of photography with emphasis on independent development of technique, composition and style. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 281 or ART 282 or consent of instructor and entry level specialization and 100 level core foundation.

ART 382 Alternative Photography 3 cr. Course will encourage exploration and production in photographic techniques not studied in beginning photography courses, including alternative techniques and special effects. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 280 or consent of instructor.

ART 390 Art Methods 4 cr. Basic experience in organizational techniques and classroom presentation as they apply specifically to the public school art class. Prerequisites: Admittance to Teacher Education and ART 122, 130, 140, 201 or consent of instructor.

ART 391 Visual Arts Seminar III .5 cr. A continuation of VA seminar, including a junior group exhibition. Restricted to Art and Art Ed majors and minors. Prerequisite: Art 291 or consent of instructor. Repeatable for credit.

ART 397 Bachelor of Fine Arts Internship 1-12 cr. This course is offered for variable credit. It is an internship in any of the following areas: Art Gallery Administration through the Northwest Art Center, The North Dakota Art Galleries Association, or a professional Art Studio Apprenticeship. A minimum of four clock-hours per credit per week. Prerequisite: Art majors only with junior status or consent of instructor. Internships are not available to students who have existing Advanced Art or internship incompletes. Grading Basis: S/U. Repeatable for credit.

ART 410 Advanced Independent Drawing 1-16 cr. Open to advanced art students for independent involvement in drawing. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. A minimum of four clock-hours per credit per week. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advanced status. Advanced Art studios are not available to students who have existing Advanced Art incompletes. Repeatable for credit up to 16 cr.

ART 411 Advanced Independent Painting 1-16 cr. Open to advanced art students for independent study in painting. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. A minimum of four clock-hours per credit per week. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advanced status. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits. Advanced Art studios are not available to students who have existing Advanced Art incompletes. Repeatable for credit up to 16 cr.

ART 412 Advanced Independent Ceramics 1-16 cr. Open to advanced art students for independent study in ceramics. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. A minimum of four clock-hours per credit per week. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advanced status. Advanced Art studios are not available to students who have existing Advanced Art incompletes. Repeatable for credit up to 16 cr.

ART 413 Advanced Independent Sculpture 1-16 cr. Open to advanced art students for independent study in sculpture. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. A minimum of four clock-hours per credit per week. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advanced status. Advanced Art studios are not available to students who have existing Advanced Art incompletes. Repeatable for credit up to 16 cr.

ART 414 Advanced Independent Graphic Design 1-16 cr. Open to advanced art students for independent study in graphic design. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. (A minimum of four clock-hours per credit per week. This course is restricted to art and art education majors. Pre-requisite: Consent of instructor or advanced status. Advanced Art studios are not available to students who have existing Advanced Art incompletes. Repeatable for credit up to 16 cr.

ART 415 Advanced Independent Jewelry 1-16 cr. Open to advanced art students for independent study in jewelry. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. A minimum of four clock-hours per credit per week. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advanced status. Advanced Art studios are not available to students who have existing Advanced Art incompletes. Repeatable for credit up to 16 cr.

ART 416 Advanced Independent Crafts 1-16 cr. Open to advanced art students for independent study in crafts. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. A minimum of four clock-hours per credit per week. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advanced status. Advanced Art studios are not available to students who have existing Advanced Art incompletes. Repeatable for credit up to 16 cr.

ART 417 Advanced Independent Photography 1-16 cr. Open to advanced art students for independent study in photography. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. A minimum of four clock-hours per credit per week. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advanced status. Advanced Art studios are not available to students who have existing Advanced Art incompletes. Repeatable for credit up to 16 cr.

ART 418 Advanced Independent Printmaking 1-16 cr. Open to advanced art students for independent study in printmaking. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. A minimum of four clock-hours per credit per week. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advanced status. Advanced Art studios are not available to students who have existing Advanced Art incompletes. Repeatable for credit up to 16 cr.

ART 419 Advanced Independent Computer Graphics 1-16 cr. Open to advanced art students for independent study in computer graphics. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. A minimum of four clock-hours per credit per week. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or advanced status. Advanced Art studios are not available to students who have existing Advanced Art incompletes. Repeatable for credit up to 16 cr.

ART 420 Advanced Study in Art History 1-6 cr. Open to advanced art students for independent research in art history. A preliminary outline of proposed research is required. This course is restricted to art majors or minors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Repeatable for credit up to 6 cr.

ART 422 Digital Design: Interactive Web 3 cr. Hierarchical and interactive digital design as related to visual communication. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 208, 213, 322 or consent of instructor.

ART 423 Digital Design: Motion 3 cr. The exploration of linear and time-based digital design as it relates to visual communication. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 209, 213 or consent of instructor.

ART 426 BFA Thesis 3 cr. Provides for individual research culminating in a thesis exhibition. Permission and guidance of BFA committee. Restricted to ART/BFA majors only. Must have at least junior status. Prerequisite: ART 391 or consent of instructor. Co-requisite: ART 491 or consent of instructor.

ART 491 Visual Arts Seminar IV .5 cr. A continuation of VA seminar, culminating in an exhibition of the student's work prior to graduation. Restricted to Art and Art Ed majors and minors. Prerequisite: Art 391 or consent of instructor. Repeatable for credit.

ART 496 Study Tour 1-6 cr. MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. The course requirements will include additional requirements beyond the travel itself and may be repeated for credit.

ART 497 Art Internship 1-12 cr. This course is offered for variable credit. It is an internship in either of the following areas: Applied Art or Fine Art Studio Apprenticeship. A minimum of four clock- hours per credit hour per week. Prerequisites: Art or Multimedia majors and senior status or consent of instructor. Grading Basis: S/U. Repeatable for credit.

ART 499 Special Topics 1-3 cr. Topics are variable. Offerings include visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

Business Administration

BADM 120 Fundamentals of Business 3 cr. Students will develop an understanding of the abilities and skills required for success in future business and nonbusiness careers and endeavors within society. This course may not be taken by business majors during their final two semesters. An excellent course for beginning students and nonbusiness majors.

BADM 226 Quantitative Methods for Business 3 cr. Introduction to the application of mathematical, statistical, and quantitative techniques to business decision making. Topics addressed will include introductory applied calculus, applied statistics, forecasting, queuing theory, and simulation. Prerequisites: MATH 240, BOTE 247 and ECON 201.

BADM 301 Fundamentals of Management 3 cr. Focuses on the nature of management, the evolution of management thought, strategic management and planning concepts, decision making and creative problem solving, and motivation and leadership in a changing environment. Prerequisite: Sophomore status.

BADM 303 Human Resource Management 3 cr. Includes personnel policies, programs, and procedures, standards, employment, staffing, wage and salary administration, personnel laws, and personnel research. Prerequisite: BADM 301.

BADM 304 Entrepreneurship/Small Business Management 3 cr. Introductory entrepreneurship course is intended to provide a solid foundation in terms of the vital role played by entrepreneurs, innovation and creativity in the global economy. The various components of a business plan are introduced. This course is complemented at the end of the management program with the entrepreneurship and new venture creation course. Prerequisite: BADM 301.

BADM 307 International Business 3 cr. (Diversity) Introduces conceptual and operational problems of participating in international business. Coverage includes a study of managerial, marketing, financial, accounting, legal, economic and cultural environments in foreign markets for the conduct of world business. Prerequisites: BADM 301 and 321.

BADM 309 Safety Management 3 cr. Introduces safety management in the work place and its application to the law, OSHA, cost analysis, program organization, and safety program administration. Prerequisite: BADM 301.

BADM 321 Marketing 3 cr. Acquaints students with the principles, concepts and perspectives underlying marketing functions, including the conception, pricing, promotion, and distribution of products, services, and ideas, and the role of marketing in society. Prerequisite: Sophomore status.

BADM 324 Integrated Marketing Communications 3 cr. Acquaints students with the role of integrated marketing communications concepts and practices in enhancing the equity of brands, and provides thorough coverage of all aspects of an IMC program: advertising, promotions, packaging, and branding strategies, point of purchase communications, marketing oriented public relations, and event and cause oriented sponsorships. Prerequisite: BADM 321 or permission of instructor.

BADM 406 Professional Business Ethics 3 cr. Studies of ethical issues faced by businesses including distributive justice, capitalism, decision-making, corporate responsibility, corporate morality, governance, whistle-blowing, hiring policies, codes of ethics, advertising, safety, pollution, and foreign business practices. Prerequisite: BADM 301.

BADM 408 Negotiations 3 cr. The study of negotiation to include framing, strategizing, planning, tactics, negotiating, and settlement. The course of study includes individual, organizational, and collective bargaining processes. It also includes practical applications of bargaining processes through group projects. Prerequisite: BADM 301.

BADM 416 Operations Management 3 cr. Introduces the concepts, issues, and problems of operations management and the management of the production function. Problems are analyzed and solutions are recommended. Microcomputer applications are addressed. Prerequisites: BADM 226 and BADM 301.

BADM 421 Applied Business Research 3 cr. Explores the full range of activities involved in the marketing research process for business including research and measurement concepts, sampling and field work, and data analysis and presentation. Prerequisite: BADM 321.

BADM 422 Consumer Behavior 3 cr. Studies the consumer decision-making process in the purchase of goods and services. Emphasis is placed on developing and understanding the determinants of consumer behavior and the appropriate application of marketing strategies. Prerequisite: BADM 321 or permission of instructor.

BADM 424 Logistics and Channel Management 3 cr. Explores channels of distribution considering behavioral, social, and economic aspects of the distribution system to include transportation, inventory management, order processing, purchasing, warehousing, materials handling, packaging, customer service, and product scheduling. Prerequisite: BADM 321.

BADM 427 International Marketing 3 cr. (Diversity)Introduces the essentials of conducting international marketing operations to include estimating market potential, developing entry strategies, and managing and controlling marketing programs. Prerequisite: BADM 321.

BADM 436 Organizational Behavior Principles and Practices 3 cr. Includes the principles, concepts, and processes that interpret human relations in management at the individual, group, and organizational levels. Prerequisite: BADM 303.

BADM 437 International Culture and Management 3 cr. (Diversity) Examines the impact of culture on business practices and introduces the student to the management process in an international setting. Includes an examination of comparative systems and environmental conditions and their impact on management decisions. Prerequisite: BADM 307.

BADM 462 International Business Strategy 3 cr. Provides an international business capstone experience. Case studies il lustrating international business decisions and operations are emphasized. Prerequisite: BADM 307.

BADM 465 Strategic Management 3 cr. An analysis of the objectives of business firms and the development and evaluation of strategies and policies designed to meet these objectives. Cases are emphasized. Prerequisites: BADM 301, 321 and FIN 353.

BADM 488 Marketing Strategy 3 cr. Management of marketing organizations and integration of functions, with emphasis on planning and designing strategies and applying tools and techniques for problem solving and decision making. Co-requisites: BADM 324, BADM 422 and BADM 427 Prerequisites: BADM 321 and BADM 421.

BADM 489 Entrepreneurship and New Venture Creation 3 cr. This course focuses on entrepreneurship, new venture creation, and the completion of your own business plan. The business plan applies principles, concepts and a framework to real world situations. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 321, BADM 321, BADM 304, and FIN 353.

BADM 496 Study Abroad 3 cr. MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit for different countries. Grading Basis: S/U. Repeatable up to 9 credits.

BADM 497 Internships 2-9 cr. A cooperative occupational training program in the area of marketing, finance, and management. Maximum of 3 credits will count toward major. Prerequisite(s): junior status, BADM major and consent of instructor. Grading Basis: S/U. Repeatable for credit up to 9 cr.

BADM 498 Management Capstone 3 cr. This course focuses on entrepreneurship, new venture creation, and the completion of a business plan. The business plan applies principles, concepts and a framework to real world situations. Co-requisite: BADM 465. Prerequisites: BADM 416 and BADM 489.

BADM 499 Special Topics in Business Administration 1-8 cr. Topics are variable. Offerings include visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

Biology

BIOL 111 Concepts of Biology 4 cr. (GE6) This course is designed to accommodate one semester of the General Education requirement for non-science majors at Minot State University. The course will focus on a comprehensive survey of modern biology with an emphasis on enhancing the science literacy of the college educated student. Topics will include, but not limited to: cell biology, genetics, evolution by natural selection, systematics, and the impact of human activity on the biosphere. Where appropriate, topics will be illustrated with examples of the human animal and at all times the course will reflect the five strands of a General Education course. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

BIOL 111H Honors Concepts of Biology 4 cr. (GE6) This course is designed to accommodate one semester of the General Education requirement for non-science majors of Minot State University. The course will focus on a comprehensive survey of modern biology with an emphasis on enhancing the science literacy of the college-educated student. Topics will include, but are not limited to: cell biology, genetics, evolution by natural selection, systematics, and the impact of human activity on the biosphere. Where appropriate, topics will be illustrated with examples of the human animal, and at all times the course will reflect the five strands of a General Education course. Laboratory time will focus on small-scale research projects and in-depth discussion. Honors Program admission is required.

BIOL 103 Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science 1 cr. Designed to acquaint first-year student (freshman) medical technology students with the depth and breadth of this field. Students visit medical technology departments at local hospitals. The course is presented by the education coordinators at local hospitals. Lecture, 1 hour.

BIOL 115 Human Structure and Function 4 cr. Structure and function of the human body. Anatomy and physiology of major body systems is emphasized. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

BIOL 127 Environmental Biology 4 cr. (GE6) Designed to acquaint students with major principles of ecology and the nature of human interaction with the living world. The course will focus on how human action influences the ecology of the earth. Ecological concepts covered will include community structure, predator prey interactions, competition, tropic levels, energy flow, the carbon cycle, and adaptation. In this light, students will examine specific issues and problems including those of land use choices, natural resource exploitation, biodiversity, industrialization, and urbanization.

BIOL 142 General Microbiology 4 cr. (GE6) A survey of microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, microbial interaction with humans, and the impact of microorganisms on the environment. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

BIOL 150 General Biology I: Introduction to Cellular Biology 4 cr. (GE6) Introduction to fundamental concepts of biology at the level of the cell including: bioenergetics, cell structure, physiology principles, genetic function and inheritance. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

BIOL 150H Honors General Biology I 4 cr. (GE6) Introduction to fundamental concepts of biology at the level of the cell including: bioenergetics, cell structure, physiology principles, genetic function and inheritance. Laboratory time will focus on small-scale research projects and in-depth discussion. Honors Program admission is required.

BIOL 151 General Biology II: Introduction to Zoology 4 cr. (GE6) The biology of animals is covered beginning with an emphasis on the underlying cellular structure and physiology and expanding towards larger whole organism features that are difficult to predict from cell biology. The general patterns of animal life are covered. In an effort to connect the general principles offered in this course to one's daily life (e.g., cellular respiration, excretion, muscle structure and function), an emphasis is placed on mammalian systems. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 115 or CHEM 121.

BIOL 151H Honors General Biology II 4 cr. (GE6) The biology of animals is covered beginning with an emphasis on the underlying cellular structure and physiology and expanding towards larger whole organism features that are difficult to predict from cell biology. The general patterns of animal life are covered. In an effort to connect the general principles offered in this course to one's daily life (e.g., cellular respiration, excretion, muscle structure and function), an emphasis is placed on mammalian systems. Laboratory time will focus on small-scale research projects and in-depth discussion. Honors Program admission is required.

BIOL 154 Introduction to Botany 4 cr. (GE6) Introduction to the biology of plants emphasizing evolution and diversity, plant anatomy and development, water and mineral nutrition, photosynthesis, and plant ecology. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

BIOL 154H Honors Introduction to Botany 4 cr. (GE6) Introduction to the biology of plants emphasizing evolution and diversity, plant anatomy and development, water and mineral nutrition, photosynthesis, and plan ecology. Laboratory time will focus on small-scale research projects and in-depth discussion. Honors Program admission is required.

BIOL 215 Genetics 4 cr. Introduction to principles of genetics including: inheritance, DNA and chromosomes, gene regulation, evolution, and genetic engineering. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 150

BIOL 220 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 cr. Structure and function of the human body dealing with the chemical, cellular, and tissue levels of organization and integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

BIOL 221 Anatomy and Physiology II 4 cr. Structure and function of the human body dealing with the digestive, cardiovascular, respiratory, lymphatic, endocrine, reproductive, and urinary systems; special senses and metabolism, fluid and electrolyte, and acid-base balance; metabolism and energetics. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 220.

BIOL 240 Biometrics 4 cr. The course will cover introductory statistic concepts in a form designed specifically for biology majors. It is a practical, sofware-based examination of concepts of sampling, hypotheses testing (non-parametric and parametric), descriptive statistics, contigency, correlation, analysis or variation, linear models, and basi multivariate techniques. Only biological, real-world data will be used. The course will concentrate on underlying princples, applicability and pratcial use of methods covered. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hour. Prerequisites: Math 103 or higher and at least two from BIOL 150, 151, and 154.

BIOL 250 Cellular Biology 4 cr. An advanced cell biology designed for biology majors with an emphasis on biological chemistry, membrane structure and transport, cellular energy metabolism, protein synthesis and modification, subcellular organelle structure and function, and the cell biology of the nucleus. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 150.

BIOL 301 Evolution 4 cr. This course details the processes that influence evolutionary change. An emphasis is placed on the methodology for (1) inferring phylogenetic relationships (i.e., history), (2) determining the relative influences of natural selection and genetic drift, and (3) exploring the conditions that lead to various modes of speciation. Topics covered include population genetics, speciation, microevolution vs. macroevolution, punctuated equilibrium, life history theory, and modes of selection. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, 151, 154, 215.

BIOL 310 Ethnobotany 4 cr. (Diversity)This course will focus on the diversity of plant uses, covering approaches of diverse lectures includeing introduction to medicinal plant uses specific to North Dakota and Native American plant use. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours.

BIOL 325 Entomology 4 cr. Classification, taxonomy, morphology, identification, life histories, interrelationships, and economic importance of insects. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 151.

BIOL 330 Biogeography 4 cr. This course will describe the spatial patterns in the distribution of species and will examine how abiotic and biotic factors are hypothesized to result in these patterns. Lecture, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour. Prerequisites: BIOL 151.

BIOL 335 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 4 cr. A study of the structure of vertebrates, with a focus on revealing the evolutionary relationships of major vertebrate groups. The laboratories will involve detailed examiniation and dissection of a broad range of vertebrate animals, including lampreys, sharks, amphibians, reptiles, and cats. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 151.

BIOL 340 Systematic Zoology 4 cr. Evolution, classification, taxonomy, and identification of invertebrates and vertebrates. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 151.

BIOL 346 Developmental Biology 4 cr. This course covers the morphological changes occurring during the development of select animals, as well as the current understanding of underlying molecular mechanisms that regulate development and produce those morphological changes. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 215.

BIOL 347 General Ecology 4 cr. Plants and animals in their environment. An ecosystem approach is used. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, 151, 154.

BIOL 349 Plant Physiology 4 cr. Physiological processes of plants with special emphasis on nutrition, metabolism, growth and development. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 150.

BIOL 350 Freshwater Biology 4 cr. Biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of inland waters including origins, interrelationships and the effect of civilization. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 142 or 150 or 151 or 154.

BIOL 360 Morphology of Vascular Plants 4 cr. Structure and development of vascular plants with special emphasis on evolutionary trends. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 150.

BIOL 401 Population Genetics 4 cr. This course explores the mechanics of evolution from the viewpoint of allelic frequencies. It begins with the basic theory of Hardy Weinberg equilibrium and expands that theory to embrace linkage disequilibrium, selection in single-locus and multifocus systems, genetic drift, and the effects of mutation rates, population size, and migration on the genetic structure of populations. Exposure is given to classic ideas (e.g., shifting balance theory and runaway sexual selection) and to applications of theory (e.g., breeding designs, conservation genetics). Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory 3 hr. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 215.

BIOL 402 Bioinformatics 4 cr. Computational methods for study of biological sequence data in comparative biology and evolution. Analysis of genome content and organization. Techniques for searching sequence databases, pairwise and multiple sequence alignment, phylogenetic methods, and methods for pattern recognition and functional inference from sequence data. Pre-Requisite(s): BIOL 150 and MATH 103

BIOL 405 Prokaryotic Physiology 4 cr. In depth examination of the physiology, metabolism, and genetics of bacteria and archaea. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 151, BIOL 154, BIOL 215 and BIOL 250.

BIOL 420 Co-op Practicum 4-8 cr. A cooperative program with industry, state, and federal agencies for an in-depth study of a specialized aspect of biology. Students spend approximately 25 clock hours per semester hour for the practicum. Prerequisite: 2 years of biology or consent of biology coordinator. Repeatable for credit.

BIOL 430 Pre-Veterinary Practicum 3 cr. This program is designed to give MSU students a hands-on experience in veterinary medicine. The students spend about 80 hours per semester for the practicum. Prerequisite: 2 years of biology.

BIOL 440 Pre-Med Practicum 3 cr. This program is designed to give MSU students a basic understanding of the hospital and its functions. Students spend approximately 90 hours per semester in the various departments and the family practice clinic. Students are supervised by the physicians involved in the program while the program is coordinated by a biology professor on campus. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

BIOL 445 Cancer Biology 4 cr. This course describes the major aspects of cell cycle control and relates them to the multiple cell cycle defects associated with cancer. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 215.

BIOL 448 Systematic Botany 4 cr. Classification and taxonomy of seed plants with emphasis on local flora. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 154.

BIOL 450 Parasitology 4 cr. Morphology, taxonomy, and life histories of the endemic, exotic, and zoonotic parasites of the animal kingdom. Diseases caused by parasites are also presented. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, MLS majors only.

BIOL 455 Hematology 4 cr. Study of the blood and hematologic disorders including anemia, leukemia, and other blood dyscrasias. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 150, MLS majors only.

BIOL 458 Anatomy of Seed Plants 4 cr. Development of cells, tissues, and organs in seed plants. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 150.

BIOL 460 Herpetology 4 cr. Herpetology is the study of reptiles (exclusive of birds) and amphibians; this includes extant groups (e.g., frogs) and extinct groups (e.g., dinosaurs). This course begins with the phylogeny, history, and taxonomy of "herps" (i.e., reptiles and amphibians) and progresses to coverage of physiology, ecology, and behavior. Prerequisite: BIOL 151.

BIOL 465 Immunology 4 cr. Principles of the mammalian immune response. Detalis of cells and mechanisms used to comb at pathogens. Some exposure to immune system disorders. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 150.

BIOL 470 Histology 4 cr. The course presents the microscopic anatomy of vertebrates with an emphasis on humans.Structure-function relationships at the cell and tissue levels are highlighted. Cell and tissue anatomy comprise the structural basis of normal physiology. Knowledge of histology is essential for understanding disease mechanisms in terms of altered structure and function of the body. Students are expected to identify cells, tissues and organs, and understand the structural basis of their function. Emphasis is placed on microscopic study in laboratories. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 150 or 220.

BIOL 475 Medical Microbiology 4 cr. Isolation, identification and clinical application of pathogenic microorganisms. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 142.

BIOL 480 Molecular Biology 4 cr. This course covers a variety of topics concerning the macromolecules of living cells, focusing on nucleic acids and proteins. Major areas of study include: DNA replication and transcription, protein synthesis (translation), and comparison of processes in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The latter part of the course will focus on mechanisms of gene expression, the molecular genetics of cancer, and applied molecular biology. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 215.

BIOL 492 Directed Research 1-5 cr. The faculty of the Department of Biology considers research a valuable component of the curriculum. The content and extent of research projects are determined by the student and a faculty sponsor. The research may be in the lab or field and is intended to help the student develop a greater appreciation of the scientific process. While publication is not a requirement, all projects have a goal of producing publishable results. A successful experience in research can be an asset for graduate studies and many careers in biology. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 150, 151, 154. Repeatable for credit.

Business Information Technology

Courses with BOTE prefix are recognized as common courses across the North Dakota University System.

BOTE 102 Keyboarding I 3 cr. Basic instruction and practice in using the alphanumeric keyboard. Emphasis on proper fingering for touch operation of the keyboard, development of speed and accuracy, and exploration of business document formatting. Offered online only.

BIT 123 Technology-Personal Development 2 cr. (GE4) Introduction to technology for personal development. Emphasis placed on how to exploit technology to achieve goals and improve quality of life.

BOTE 127 Information Processing 3 cr. Introduction to computer concepts, hardware and software applications, operating systems, word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, and Internet. Course may be waived if student holds MOS certification in Word, Excel, and Power Point at the specialist level.

BOTE 152 Keyboarding II 3 cr. Development of speed and accuracy in keyboarding straight copy and production activities. Emphasis placed on formatting and keying various business documents including memos, letters, reports, and tables from straight copy, rough drafts, and unarranged material. Prerequisite(s): BOTE 102 or at least one semester of high school keyboarding. Offered online only.

BIT 154 Word Processing and Presentation Software 3 cr. Use of word processing and presentation software to create professional business documents and presentations. Prerequisite(s): previous computer experience.

BIT 220 Management Information Systems 3 cr. Designed to provide an introduction to systems and development concepts, technology acquisition, and various types of application software that have become prevalent or are emerging in modern organizations and society. This course also introduces students to contemporary information systems and demonstrates how these systems are used throughout global organizations. The focus of this course is on the key components of information systems - people, software, hardware, data, and communication technologies, and how these components can be integrated and managed to create competitive advantage.

BIT 235 Introduction to Web Site Design 3 cr. Basics of web site design using HTML code and web editing software. Prerequisite(s): Previous computer experience.

BIT 236 Business Design Tools 3 cr. Hands-on computer course that surveys current software packages in the area of desktop publishing. Prerequisite(s): Previous computer experience.

BOTE 247 Spreadsheet Applications 3 cr. Intermediate and advanced use of application software for creation of spreadsheets, graphs, databases, and macros. Integration with other software applications is also reviewed. MIS students should take this course prior to CSCI 111. Prerequisite(s): Previous computer experience.

BIT 310 IT Project Management 3 cr. Designed to examine the processes, methods, techniques, and tools that organizations use to manage their information systems projects utilizing a systematic methodology for initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing projects.

BIT 311 Collaborative Computing 3 cr. Designed to explore team creation, social and environmental aspects, member roles, and virtual team management. Prerequisite: BIT 220

BIT 312 Data and Information Mgmt 3 cr. This course provides students with an introduction to the core concepts in data and information management. It is centered around the core skills of identifying organizational information requirements, modeling them using conceptual data modeling techniques, converting the conceptual data models into relational data models and verifying its structural characteristics with normalization techniques and implementing and utilizing a relational database. Prerequisites: BIT 220, BIT 311, and BIT 310.

BIT 318 Business Communication 3 cr. Focuses on oral, written and nonverbal communication skills used in business. Emphasis on virtual and global communication, listening and collaborative communications skills, and enhancement of communication using multimedia. Co-requisite: BADM 301. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 110 and previous computer experience.

BIT 342 Advanced Web Site Design 3 cr. Enhancement of students' skills to plan and develop well-designed web sites that combine effective navigation with the balanced use of graphics, text, and color. Prerequisite(s): BIT 235 and BIT 236.

BIT 358 IT Infrastructure 3 cr.Designed to explore topics related to both computer and systems architecture and communication networks.

BIT 370 Web-Based App Development 3 cr. Designed to explore e-Business technologies, web programming languages, databases, and user input. Offered online only. Prerequisites: BIT 235 and BIT 312.

BIT 385 Technology Management 3 cr. Designed to explore current issues, approaches to the management of technology, the interaction of new technologies with existing technologies, legal and regulatory implications of technology, ethics, and the processes through which organizations generate and absorb technological innovations.

BIT 391 Methods of Teaching Business 3 cr. Emphasizes the competencies needed for preserve teachers that may apply to the teaching of any business course. Special emphasis placed on classroom management strategies, unit development, lesson planning, and evaluation and assessment options, along with other activities pertaining to the actual teaching experience. Offered on campus fall odd years only. Prerequisite(s): Admission to teacher education and MOS certification at specialist level in Word, Excel or PowerPoint.

BIT 421 Philosophy of Career and Technical Education 3 cr. Addresses the history, growth, legislation, and elements of career and technical education. Students research principles and practices of vocational business education and their relationship to general business education and other areas of career and technical education. Offered on campus fall. Co-requisite: BIT 423. Prerequisite(s): Admission to teacher education and junior status.

BIT 423 Coordinating Techniques 2 cr. Study of cooperative office and other work experience programs. Principles in developing career and technical education materials as well as the utilization of community resources are presented. Study of business education curriculum is also included. Offered on campus fall odd years only. Corequisite: BIT 421. Prerequisite(s): junior status and admission to teacher education.

BIT 440 Enterprise Architecture 3 cr. Designed to explore the design, selection, implementation, and management of enterprise IT solutions. The focus is on applications and infrastructures as applied within the business. Prerequisite: BIT 220.

BIT 441 IS Strategy, Mgmt & Acquisition 3 cr. Designed to explore the issues and approaches managing change, manageing the information system's function in organizations, and how the IS function integrates, supports, and enables various types of organizational capabilities. Prerequisite: BIT 440.

BIT 443 Outsourcing Management 3 cr. Designed to explore the initiation of a sourcing decision and evaluation process through supplier selection and transition to outsourcing and insourcing. Prerequisite: BIT 220.

BIT 444 IT Security & Info Assurance 3 cr. Designed to explore hardware, software, processes, communications, applications, and policies and procedures with respect to organizational IT Security and Risk Management. Prerequisite: BIT 358.

BIT 445 IT Audit and Controls 3 cr. Designed to explore the fundamental concepts of the information technology audit and control function. The main focus of this course is understanding information controls, the types of controls and their impact on the organization, and how to manage an audit. Prerequisite: BIT 385.

BIT 452 Client/Server Database 3 cr. Designed to explore the issues of managing database systems as essential organizational resources. Students learn the enterprise-data-architecture components, data storage configurations, and information retrieval methods. Prerequisite: BIT 312 .

BIT 453 Systems Analysis 3 cr. Designed to explore systematic methodologies for analyzing a business problem or opportunity, determining what role, if any, computer-based technologies can play in addressing the business need, articulating business requirements for the technology solution, specifying alternative approaches to acquiring the technology capabilities needed to address the business requirements, and specifying the requirements for the systems solution. Prerequisites: BIT 220, BIT 310, and BIT 311.

BIT 460 MIS Seminar 3 cr. Provides students an opportunity to explore current issues, trends, and careers in the field. Prerequisites: Senior status and final semester of program.

BIT 470 Projects in MIS 3 cr. Culminating experience for all MIS majors. The application of concepts learned from courses taken in the College of Business core, Management Information Systems core, and tracks are applied to real world projects. Prerequisite: Senior Status.

BIT 497 Internship 3-9 cr. Internship allows the student to combine an on-the-job learning experience with related academic coursework. Prerequisite(s): Senior status, restricted to MIS majors.

BIT 499 Special Topics 1-4 cr. Topics will vary from year to year. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

Chemistry

CHEM 110 Survey of Chemistry 4 cr. (GE6) An introductory course covering topics that concern students' everyday lives. This course is designed for liberal arts and General Education students. The course consists of an introduction to the science and includes historical perspectives. The course is intended to present chemistry in its broad cultural, social, and economic context. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

CHEM 115/115L Introductory Chemistry 4 cr. (GE6) Presents knowledge of concepts of chemical principles in greater depth and with more mathematical applications than in CHEM 110. Includes studies of general inorganic principles. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Corequisite: MATH 102 or 103.

CHEM 121/121L General Chemistry I 5 cr. (GE6) This course is the first of a two-semester sequence primarily intended for students majoring in science and science-related fields. Topics likely to be covered in this semester include: matter, measurement, atoms, ions, molecules, reactions, chemical calculations, thermochemistry, bonding, molecular geometry, periodicity, and gases. Lecture, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour; laboratory, 3 hours. Corequisite: MATH 103. Note: CHEM 121 and 121L must be taken concurrently.

CHEM 122/122L General Chemistry II 5 cr. (GE6) This course is the second of a two-semester sequence primarily intended for students majoring in science and science-related fields. Topics likely to be covered in this semester include: intermolecular forces, liquids, solids, kinetics, equilibria, acids, bases, solution chemistry, precipitation, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Lecture, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHEM 121/121L. Note: CHEM 122/122L must be taken concurrently.

CHEM 127 Chemistry of the Environment 4 cr. (GE6)This course is unique in that it uses topics of concern/interest to facilitate the learning and understanding of the scientific concepts behind them. The course will use current environmental topics, such as our atmosphere, global warming, energy, the ozone layer and water quality, to bring forward important chemical concepts as naming, bonding, stoichiometry, energetics, pH and chemical reactions. The course will also bring an interdisciplinary flavor to the material, discussing such topics as the carbon cycle and biological contributions, how earth processes may affect the quality of our drinking water and the effect of acid rain on the earth (both in terms of the geology and the ecosystem). Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

CHEM 230 Quantitative Analysis 5 cr. A course in quantitative chemistry including gravimetric and volumetric analysis, statistical treatment of data, and an introduction to some instrumental analysis. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 122/122L.

CHEM 227 Principles of Environmental Chemistry 4 cr. Designed to provide students with a basic introduction to Environmental Chemistry. The course will introduce students to the environmental pathways, toxicology, and organic and inorganic environmental contaminants. The students will also study various process in the environment, including those in air, soil, and water. Depending on time, students may also be introduced to the management of hazardous materials Prerequisite: CHEM 127.

CHEM 240 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry 5 cr. Theory of bonding and structure in organic molecules and their reactions. An emphasis on functional groups related to biological molecules. This course presents the minimum preparation for CHEM 481. Offered in the fall. Lecture, 4 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 122/122L.

CHEM 341 Organic Chemistry I 5 cr. A study of the different classes of organic functional groups, their nomenclature, reactions, and properties. An introduction to Infrared and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy is included. Offered in the fall. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 122/122L.

CHEM 342 Organic Chemistry II 5 cr. A continuation of CHEM 341. A study of the chemical and mechanistic properties of organic functional groups. Offered in the spring. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 341.

CHEM 360 Principles of Physical Chemistry 4 cr. This course is designed for students interested in chemical education at the secondary level. Topics include gas laws, thermodynamics, equilibria, kinetics, quantum mechanics, and spectroscopy. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 230 and MATH 107.

CHEM 380 Environmental Chemistry 4 cr. The course examines the interaction of chemical substances with the environment. Emphasis is placed on water quality and air quality. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 230.

CHEM 420 Inorganic Chemistry 3 cr. An advanced course in inorganic chemistry, including theories of covalent and ionic bonding, crystalline structure, coordinate covalent bonding, group theory, and coordination chemistry. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHEM 122, MATH 165.

CHEM 422 Inorganic Synthesis 1 cr. Applied techniques in inorganic synthesis and compound characterization. Offered on demand. Laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Corequisite: CHEM 420.

CHEM 430 Instrumental Analysis 5 cr. A survey of instrumental methods used for chemical analysis. These methods include molecular absorption, atomic absorption and emission, fluorescence and phosphorescence, infrared absorption chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 230.

CHEM 440 Organic Spectroscopy 3 cr. Identification of organic molecules via spectroscopic methods. Methods studied include infrared, UV-visible, proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 342.

CHEM 461 Physical Chemistry I 4 cr. This course is the first of a two-semester sequence of calculus-based physical chemistry for chemistry majors. Topics covered include thermodynamics and equilibrium. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 122, MATH 16666, and PHYS 222.

CHEM 462 Physical Chemistry II 4 cr. A continuation of CHEM 461. Topics include: quantum mechanics, molecular orbital theory, group theory, and spectroscopy. Offered alternate spring terms. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 461.

CHEM 481 Biochemistry I 3 cr. Study of major classes of biological compounds, synthesis of macromolecules, enzyme kinetics, intermediary metabolism, and control mechanisms. Lecture, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 240 or 342 and BIOL 150.

CHEM 480L Biochemistry Laboratory 2 cr. A course covering theory and laboratory experience with a variety of techniques used in biochemistry. Laboratory, 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 230. Corequisite: CHEM 481.

CHEM 482 Biochemistry II 3 cr. A continuation of CHEM 481 with more in-depth studies of particular pathways; particular emphasis is placed on medicinal chemistry and on corresponding clinical applications associated with the various pathways. Lecture, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 481.

CHEM 494 Directed Research in Chemistry 1-6 cr. Students conduct research under the direction of a faculty mentor. The general topic and specific goals and activities are agreed upon by the student the mentor. The number of credits is proportional to the time committed to the research. Repeatable for up to 6 credits total.

CHEM 499 Special Topics 1-8 cr. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

Communication Arts/Broadcasting

COMM 099 Recitals 0 cr. This is a zero credit course required of all communication arts majors and minors, and is required each semester in attendance. It is designed to accumulate information about each student's required attendance at predesignated communication arts department recitals. Grading Basis: S/U.

COMM 110 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 cr. (GE1) The theory and practice of public speaking with emphasis on topic selection, content, organization of material, language, methods of securing attention and maintaining interest, delivery and critical evaluation of informative and persuasive messages. May not be used as part of communication arts major, minor, or concentration.

COMM 120 Introduction to Broadcasting 3 cr. Basic introduction to commercial and non-commercial broadcasting.

COMM 191 Freshman Seminar 1 cr. Introduction of departmental requirements and opportunities. Communication arts majors or minors only.

COMM 194 Independent Study 1-3 cr. Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of communication. Communication arts majors or minors only.

COMM 210 Advanced Public Speaking 3 cr. An advanced course in the art of oral discourse. Emphasis is placed on professional presentations, adapting to diverse audiences, logic, persuasion, and rhetorical analysis. Prerequisite(s): COMM 110 or consent of instructor.

COMM 211 Communication and Popular Culture 3 cr. Includes analysis of audience, occasion, subject and speaker. Subject matter will include such media as movies, songs, television, humor, fashion, public demonstration, advertisements, architecture, etc. Includes text readings, group discussion, analytical essays, and a critical paper and presentation.

COMM 212 Interpersonal Communication 3 cr. Introduces fundamental concepts of communication between individuals. Exploring aspects of self expression, relationship communication—how people present themselves, and how others perceive them in return.

COMM 213 Rhetoric of Place and Space 3cr. This class will pursue, historical, literary, artistic, philosophical, and poetic but primarily rhetorical research and discussion on the subject at hand. Students in education, Comm. Arts, Humanities will find it useful in their fields of study, but any student with roots of engagement in PLACE and COMMUNITY will find it useful.

COMM 218 Public Relations Principles 3 cr. An introduction to the theory and practice of public relations, emphasizing management functions, its publics, writing skills, communications process, tools, and professional ethics.

COMM 219 Mass Media and Society 3 cr. Basic communication theory and its application to mass communication with emphasis on social, cultural, and political implication of the media.

COMM 220 Broadcast Advertising and Applications 3 cr. This course will examine, through research ad field experience, the fundamental elements of electronic advertising practices and applications. Students will learn success factors that increase the power of advertising through mass media. Restricted to sophomore, junior, and senior status.

COMM 221 PR & Media Writing 3 cr. Introduction to basic writing skills in the field of public relations & the media. This is a writing intensive course. You will learn how to adapt message for various media & mediums. Specifically, you will learn to compose news releases, media advisories, internal communications information, and more. Active writing is a key component taught in this course. This course teaches students how to prepare professional public relations messages for print electronic media.

COMM 224 Publication Makeup and Design 3 cr. Introduction to the technical aspects of newspaper, magazine, and yearbook production.

COMM 225 Audio Production I 3 cr. Laboratory and lecture course with emphasis on the principles and techniques of radio production and programming.

COMM 244 Reporting and Feature Writing 3 cr. Introduction to news gathering, judgment, writing, history, conventions and style of the news story, the newspaper feature story, and the magazine article.

COMM 245 Collaborative Journalism 3 cr. Introduction to a new mode of journalism in which students work cooperatively with faculty, professional journalists and local citizens to produce news stories relevant to campus and community life.

COMM 281 Reporting and Editing 1 cr. Laboratory course in which class members work on the campus paper and attend staff meetings. Repeatable for credit up to 8 cr.

COMM 283 TV Activities 1 cr. An opportunity for students to work on various video projects that they will produce for on and off campus. Repeatable for credit up to 8 cr.

COMM 284 Radio Activities 1 cr. An opportunity for students to work on various audio projects that they will produce for on and off campus groups. Repeatable for credit up to 8 cr.

COMM 285 Communication Arts Activities 1 cr. The participation in a significant capacity in any communication arts activity above and beyond the requirements of a specific course. Repeatable for credit up to 8 cr.

COMM 286 Promotion Activities 1 cr. The course provides students with an understanding of how to strategically plan promotions. Students are able to engage in real life events activities such as planning, marketing, advertising, production, writing, and more. Students are taught time management along side promotions. This course specifically directs students to have hands on experience within the Broadcasting Department. More directly, writing newsletters, promotions of channel 19, alumni relations, web site writing & creation, and advertising.

COMM 291 Sophomore Seminar 1 cr. Study of communication (people, events, activities) as determined by student/professor consultation. Communication majors or minors only. Grading Basis: S/U.

COMM 297 Internship 1-2 cr. Hands-on experience in the discipline Restricted to communication majors or minors or consent of instructor.

COMM 311 Oral Interpretation 3 cr. The study of literature for performance with emphasis on written and verbal analysis. The technique of performance applied to oral reading of literature.

COMM 315 Persuasion and Argumentation 3 cr. An investigation of the structure, types, and tests of arguments with practical application in preparing and presenting persuasive speeches. Prerequisite(s): COMM 110 or consent of instructor.

COMM 316 Group Dynamics 3 cr. Study of techniques of group discussion and small group theory with emphasis on participating in various types of discussion and conferences.

COMM 317 Rhetorical Theory 3 cr. A study of the development of rhetorical critical standards and practices from ancient times to the present.

COMM 318 Organizational Communication 3 cr. The course is a study of communication practices in organizations by examining organizational structure, leadership, team building, and ethics. The course will include communication areas such as diversity, conflict, stress, and technology.

COMM 322 Media Sales and Analysis 3 cr. A close up look at the business of broadcast advertising, including radio, TV, and cable.

COMM 323 Journalism History 3 cr. Examination of the news gathering function of the mass media with special emphasis on press theory and the development of thought of freedom of expression.

COMM 324 Community Relations 3 cr. This course examines current communication strategies used to establish and maintain contact with communities. Sects of society integrate communication differently and it's essential to a public relations practitioner to understand those levels of communication. This class explores a variety of ways to maintain community relations, focusing specifically on technology and social networking. Most importantly it informs students how to utilize community resources to promote strong community relations.

COMM 325 Campaigns and Strategies 3 cr. This course will explore marketing, public relations, and advertising relationships in today's market. The textbook, classroom lectures, guest speakers, and assignments will build a solid foundation in the fundamentals needed to develop and implement campaigns and strategies in the field of public relations, advertising, and marketing. Prerequisite(s): COMM 218 and Junior or Senior status.

COMM 326 Media Announcing 3 cr. Theories, practices, and techniques of "on-air" presentation will be the focus of this course. Students will develop the skills necessary to perform a variety of media announcing tasks. Students will study the techniques and styles required to perform as media newscasters, interviewers, program hosts, commercial and public service announcers. Prerequisite(s): COMM 120 or consent of instructor.

COMM 327 Editing and Advising 3 cr. Introduction to the problems of administering and advising publications (especially student publications).

COMM 344 Investigative Reporting 3 cr. This course is an introduction to the subject matter, techniques and ethics of investigative reporting. It will include such topics as secondary sources, primary documents, people sources, computer-assisted reporting, writing projects, accuracy and ethics. Prerequisite: COMM 244.

COMM 354 Special Events Planning 3 cr. The course will introduce students to special event processes and techniques. Students will become knowledgeable about model workplace skills, leadership development, promotions, media relations, and production associated with an event. Site selection, program planning, and material development will be among other designations for the course.

COMM 360 Video Production I 3 cr. Emphasis on the operation of video, audio, and editing equipment. Prerequisite(s): COMM 120.

COMM 361 Broadcast News Writing 3 cr. Intensive survey and application of gathering, writing, and presenting.

COMM 362 Electronic News Gathering 3 cr. An introduction to the practical knowledge of basic electronic news gathering production techniques, as well as to learn to operate equipment associated with ENG. Students will learn the correct terminology and the basic formats of ENG. Prerequisite(s): COMM 360.

COMM 389 Directing Forensics 2 cr. Theory, philosophy, and practice in speech contest/festival design and of coaching individual forensic events and debate. Designed for the teacher who will be asked to coach speech on the secondary level. May be taken at the same time as student teaching.

COMM 390 Communication Arts Methods 3 cr. Methods and materials for creative teaching of speaking, listening, and theatre and broadcast activities, in today's secondary school environment. Prerequisite(s): Admittance to Teacher Education.

COMM 392 Junior Project 1 cr. The course will include proposal writing procedures and defense, journal writing, research as dictated by the individual's project, public relations policies leading to the public presentation of a recital. All in preparation for the Senior Recital. Prerequisite(s): COMM 099.

COMM 394 Independent Study 1-3 cr. Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of communication. Communication arts majors or minors only. Repeatable for credit.

COMM 395 Service Learning 3 cr. Students will utilize reflection and research (both primary and secondary) to integrate personal community or global service experience(s). Communication arts majors or minors only.

COMM 397 Communication Arts Practicum 3 cr. Student Internship with application of specialized techniques in broadcasting, theatre, or other areas of communication arts. Grading Basis: S/U.

COMM 410 Advanced Problems 3 cr. Courses beyond the present offerings in broadcasting, speech communication, and theatre arts. No more than three courses may be accrued.

COMM 411 Communication Issues and Ethics 3 cr. The course will focus on current communications issues in social and workplace settings. Areas of study will include the history of free speech, the responsibility of the media, the responsibility of the individual as sender and receiver of messages, and ethical decision making.

COMM 412 Communication Law 3 cr. A study of the regulatory policies (federal, state, and municipal) in modern electronic and print media.

COMM 413 Gender Communication 3 cr. (Diversity) Course designed to explore the theories surrounding differences and similarities in male and female communication. Focus on ways in which gender roles originated and are sustained in a variety of contexts including families, organizations, institutions, peer groups, the media, and interpersonal relationships. Prerequisite(s): COMM 110 and Junior or Senior status.

COMM 425 Crisis Communication 3 cr. This course develops the public relations practitioner from a theoretical and professional approach. Students will learn how to incorporate grounded theory into crisis management plans. This course develops the research base focusing on fundamental case studies within the field in order to develop a proactive approach to crisis management. Students will learn how to use an ethical framework when engaging communities, organizations or the society at large before, during and after a crisis situation.Prerequisite(s): COMM 218

COMM 460 Video Production II 3 cr. Use of TV video, audio, and editing equipment in various news and commercial applications. Prerequisite(s): COMM 360.

COMM 475 Broadcast Production 1-3 cr. The operations, techniques, and practices of broadcast production. Activities include originating, acquiring, organizing, and assembling news segments into a complete television program. Prerequisite(s): COMM 360. Repeatable for credit up to 8 cr.

COMM 492 Senior Project 3 cr. Special project undertaken during the senior year with the direct supervision of an instructor. Projects may be chosen from any area of the communication arts department. Prerequisite(s): COMM 099, 392, and consent of faculty.

COMM 497 Broadcast Practicum 4 cr. Internship in the mass communication field allowing the students to put into practice, in a professional setting, those techniques and theories learned in their coursework. Prerequisite(s): Completion of 40 credits in communications with a 2.75 GPA in major.

Communication Disorders

CD 025 Speech Improvement 1 cr. Therapy for those needing remedial assistance for problems with articulation, fluency, hearing, voice, and/or language disorders. Repeatable for credit.

CD 150 Profession of Com Disorders 2 cr. An introduction into the profession of Communication Disorders. Contents will describe the progression from the preprofessional student level to the expert-consultant level. Major topics will include development of interpersonal skills, professional skills, problem-solving skills, technical skills and knowledge/experience.

CD 310 Intro Communication Disorders 3 cr. A survey of various communication disorders: language, phonology, fluency, voice, hearing impairment, cleft palate, cerebral palsy, aphasia. Ten hours of clinical observation are required.

CD 320 Introduction to Phonetics 3 cr. A study of the sounds of American English and the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) to record normal and disordered articulatory production. Five hours of clinical observation are required.

CD 321 Language Development 3 cr. The study of those events and processes which combine in relatively predictable and observable ways and are evidenced in the acquisition of language.

CD 322 Speech Sound Disorders 3 cr. A study of the types, causes, and treatment of speech disorders including articulation and phonological disorders, voice, and fluency. Prerequisites: CD 310, 320.

CD 324 Techniques in Communication Disorders 3 cr. Therapy approaches and techniques for completing clinical practicum. This course includes a required laboratory experience and is a Prerequisite for CD 411. Prerequisites: CD 322.

CD 331 Language Disorders in Children 3 cr. The study of deviant language patterns and language patterns associated with cultural diversity. Language evaluation with emphasis on linguistic analysis and the development of language programming appropriate to language problems will be covered. Prerequisite(s): CD 321.

CD 341 Speech and Hearing Science 2 cr. Fundamentals of acoustics, speech production, speech perception, and basic instrumentation. Prerequisite(s): CD 310.

CD 342 Introduction to Audiology 4 cr. A study of the basic tests of hearing with emphasis on test administration and interpretation. It includes anatomy and physiology of the auditory system and its relationship to various types and degrees of hearing loss. Prerequisite(s): CD 310.

CD 410 Audiology Practicum 1 cr. This practicum course will provide the undergraduate student in Communication Disorders, who has an interest in Audiology, the opportunity to participate in Audiology diagnostics in the CD clinic. The student will initially observe the audiologic diagnostic/patient management protocols in the clinic and will gradually be required to participate in greater measure. The goal is for the student to acquire greater understanding of audiologic test administration, interpretation, and patient counseling. Pre-requisite: CD 342

CD 411 Clinical Practicum 3 cr. Supervised practicum in a clinical setting. Students must enroll for a minimum of 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): CD 324. Repeatable for credit.

CD 412 Neurology for Comm. Disorders 2 cr. This course provides an overview of the role of neuroanatomy in speech and language. Attention is given to the structures of the brain and spinal cord, the ascending and descending pathways, cranial nerves, and the vascular supply to the brain. The role of these structures in the communication process is discussed. Prerequisites: CD 310, 341.

CD 413 Anatomy and Phys for Comm. Dis 3 cr. This course provides an overview of the anatomical and physiological bases of communication. Attention is given to the structures and functions of the respiratory, phonatory, resonatory and articulatory systems. Prerequisite(s): CD 310, 341, and 412.

CD 420 Advanced Communication Disorders 3 cr. This course will provide a general overview of neurologically based communication disorders, dysphagia, voice disorders, and stuttering. Course work will emphasize characteristics, procedures for assessment, and general treatment approaches for these communication disorders.

CD 426 Speech-Language Development and Disorders for Teachers 4 cr. The study of speech language development and disorders of children. Inter-relationships among personal, social, academic, speech and language skills are covered. Academic modifications and coordination with specialized personnel are emphasized. For non-majors.

CD 427 Aural Rehabilitation 3 cr. Study of the rehabilitative philosophies and methodologies of individuals with hearing impairments.

Computer Science

CSCI 101 Introduction to Computer Science 3 cr. General hardware and software issues such as: terminology, environments. Applications such as: word processing, spreadsheets, databases, Internet usage.

CSCI 111 Introduction to Web Languages 4 cr. Introduction to programming in a high-level language. Emphasis on problem solving and logical thinking. Design, implementation and testing of programs for small scale problems using elementary data types and control structures using web programming languages. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 101

CSCI 112 Visual Basic and VBA 4 cr. Introduction to programming in Visual BASIC and Visual Basic Application. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 111

CSCI 115 Introduction to PC Systems 3 cr. PC hardware and software management, fundamental principles of computer hardware, file management, troubleshooting. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 101 or consent of instructor.

CSCI 127 Beginning JAVA 4 cr. An introduction to programming in the JAVA language. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 101 or departmental consent.

CSCI 160 Computer Science I 4 cr. An introduction to computer science, with problem solving, algorithm development, and structured programming in a high-level language. Emphasis on designing, coding, debugging, and documentation, using techniques of good programming style. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 111

CSCI 161 Computer Science II 4 cr. Object-oriented concepts, terminology and notation. The C++ language is explored including topics such as dynamic memory, exception handling, function and class templates, operator overloading, inheritance, polymorphism, and generic programming with the standard template library. Additional topics may include GUI libraries. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 160.

CSCI 177 Intermediate JAVA 4 cr.Intermediate level programming in the JAVA language. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 127.

CSCI 221 Web and Internet Programming 4 cr. Service side programming for the WWW. Emphasis on servlet programming and distributed component programming using API's for object serialization, remote method invocation, database connectivity and XML generation. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 161.

CSCI 242 Algorithms & Data Structures I 4 cr. Advanced programming techniques including recursion, divide-and-conquer, and backtracking. Dynamic and static data structures including lists, stacks, and queues. Modular programming, program specification and verification, and analysis of algorithms. Prerequisite: CSCI 161.

CSCI 243 Algorithms & Data Structures II 4 cr. Advanced programming techniques including sorting, binary trees, AVL trees, graphs and networks. A discussion of searching techniques for conceptual graphs and networks and additional searching strategies. Analysis of algorithms will also be presented. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 242

CSCI 260 UNIX Environment 4 cr. An introduction to the UNIX environment. Basic tools and utilities. Shell programming. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 160.

CSCI 275 Computer and Digital Hardware I 4 cr. Fundamentals of digital systems, data representations, mathematics of digital systems, microprocessor design and instruction sets, introduction to laboratory equipment. Prerequisite(s): Math 103 and CSCI 160 or instructor consent.

CSCI 297 Internship 1-8 cr. Supervised professional work experience in a cyber-technology environment at the 100 & 200 course level. May not be counted towards earned credits for major or minor. Grading basis: S/U. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

CSCI 299 Special Topics 1-4 cr. Variable topics. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

CSCI 321 Windows Programming 4 cr. Development of applications for the Windows environment and use of a standard library and its classes. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 161.

CSCI 323 Robotics 4 cr. Introduction to robotics, computer design, programming of autonomous robot systems, basic dynamics and control of motion, sensors, and artificial intelligence techniques for robot applications in the real world. Individual and group projects analyze robot control problems and design hardware and software solutions. Students write basic control programs for different robot platforms and apply state-of-the-art artificial intelligence techniques to the control of robotic mechanisms.

CSCI 330 Software Engineering 4 cr. The principles, methods, and models used to develop and manage software projects, including test implementation of a large-scale project. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 161, 275, 340.

CSCI 331 Social Implications 4 cr. (Diversity) The effects of computer technology (hardware and/or software) on society and individuals; ethical problems faced by computer professionals; human interaction and interfacing with computer technology. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 161, 275 and 340 or instructor consent

CSCI 340 Local Area Networks 4 cr. The design and management of local area networks. Emphasis is placed on laboratory work. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 160.

CSCI 352 Comparative Languages 4 cr. Comparison of procedural and non-procedural languages. Study of strengths and weaknesses of languages for solving various problems. Introduction to implementation issues such as memory allocation. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 160.

CSCI 356 Database Management 4 cr. Principles of database design and programming. Relational, network and hierarchical models. Inverted files, searching and sorting key maintenance. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 160 or equivalent.

CSCI 360 Systems Programming 4 cr. Programming using interrupts and operating systems services. Device driver implementation. Brief comparison of different hardware systems. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 370.

CSCI 370 Computer Organization 4 cr. The structure and organization of computer hardware. Register implementation and usage. Memory management. Comparison of architectures. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 275

CSCI 375 Computer and Digital Hardware II 4 cr. Advanced applications of digital systems. Builds on the content of CSCI 275, with emphasis on system design. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 275.

CSCI 391 Teaching Computer Science 2 cr. Classroom management and equipment. Analysis of student difficulties, survey of current literature, observation and practicum. Pre-requisite(s): CSCI 160, CSCI 370 and admission to Teacher Education.

CSCI 394 Independent Study 1-4 cr. Repeatable for credit.

CSCI 440 Data Comm & Computer Security 4 cr. Network administration and management of data protocols and models, basic configrations, software, hardware, amd routing applications. Problems of computer security and possible solutions, internet security, secure operation system and kernels, with a empahsis on applications. Preqeuisite(s): CSCI 340.

CSCI 450 Operating Systems 4 cr. Design and implementation of operating systems. Study of the control of and communication between interacting processes. Resource allocation and management in a multiprogramming environment. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 360.

CSCI 452 Compiler and Interpreter Construction 4 cr. Theory and practice of program translation. Lexical and syntactic analysis, error detection and response, optimization. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 370 and CSCI 352.

CSCI 458 Computer Security 4 cr. Problems of computer security and possible solutions, internet security, secure operating systems and kernels. Emphasis on applications. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 340.

CSCI 460 Project Development 4 cr. A capstone course. The student chooses a project in consultation with the instructor. The student then prepares a statement of the scope of the project and develops it to the specification. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 242, 275 and 356.

CSCI 497 Internship 1-8 cr. Supervised professional experience in computing applications. A maximum of 2 credits may be counted toward a major or minor. Grading Basis: S/U. Prerequisite(s): Departmental Approval. Repeatable for credit up to 8 cr.

CSCI 499 Special Topics 1-4 cr. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

Criminal Justice

CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 cr. Examines the criminal justice process, including legislative law-making, law enforcement, prosecution, the courts, and corrections; highlights contemporary issues and landmark cases influencing case processing at different stages throughout the criminal justice system; familiarizes students with the Bill of Rights and Amendments critical to law enforcement, evidentiary issues, and correctional procedures; a basic survey and Prerequisite(s) for all criminal justice courses.

CJ 226 Introduction to Criminal Investigations 3 cr. This course provides a broad examination of the basic principles involved in conducting a criminal investigation. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201.

CJ 227 Children and Youth as Crime Victims 3 cr. This course will explore the recognized physical, emotional, and behavioral indicators of abuse and mistreatment of children and adolescents, and the factors and conditions which can influence their adult offenders. Potential intervention approaches will be examined regarding their suitablility and desired outcomes while regarding the family relationship. Recommended: CJ 201.

CJ 229 Interviewing and Interrogation 3 cr. Examination of interviewing and interrogation knowledge, principles, interpersonal skills, methods, and techniques for understanding the psychological, ethcial, and legal aspects of obtaining information from subjects. Course provides the fundamentals used in law enforcement, probation, corrections, juvenile justice, homeland security as well as other areas of application.

CJ 299 Special Topics 1-8 cr. Independent investigations of topics of special interest related to criminal justice. Topics may vary to reflect contemporary criminal justice issues. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201. Course may be repeated as topics change, but only 6 credits can be applied toward CJ requirements.

CJ 300 Policing and Police-Community Relations 3 cr. An historical examination of the evolution of the role of police in Western culture; included are the philosophical, social, legal, political, educational and religious influences on the purpose of police power of the state; examines current and future trends, research and practices that are developed for the policing function; discusses the social and individual effects of police work in Western society. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201.

CJ 320 Probation, Parole, and Intermediate Punishments 3 cr. Distinguishes between probation and parole; examines community corrections options, including home confinement, electronic monitoring, intensive supervised probation/parole; uses of volunteers and paraprofessionals; presentence investigation report preparation; probation/parole officer work roles, duties; functions of jails; recidivism of clients; contemporary community correctional issues. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201.

CJ 322 Criminal Law 3 cr. A critical examination of the development and function of Western criminal law; analyzes current definitions of criminal acts and omissions, defenses and justifications in the social and legal society of the United States; illustrates the development of legal interpretations of criminal statutes through the use of current and historical U.S. Supreme Court and state court decisions. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201.

CJ 330 Criminological Theory 3 cr. Provides an examination of the major criminological schools of thought as well as the prominent theorists within each school; theories are presented that examine criminal motivation and the application of criminal law; additionally, the implicit theoretical assumptions regarding the punishment of offenders is examined. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201.

CJ 335 Private Security and Justice Organizations 3 cr. This course introduces the areas of Private Security, Loss Prevention, Corporate Technology Security, Contract-based Private Sector Criminal Justice Organizations, and their relationship to traditional components of American Criminal Justice and Homeland Security. Recommended: CJ 201.

CJ 340 Juvenile Justice System 3 cr. Illustrates major components of juvenile justice system, including arrest, intake, adjudication, and disposition of juvenile offenders; examines transfer process for treating juveniles as adults; describes landmark legal cases extending rights to juveniles; examines juvenile court organization as an adversarial system; treatment of contemporary juvenile justice issues, including death penalty for juveniles and deinstitutionalization of status offenders. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201.

CJ 345 Policy Issues in Criminal Justice 3 cr. Assessment of the development, efficacy, and politics of criminal justice policy. Emphasis on analyzing the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of criminal justice policy. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201.

CJ 348 Legal/Ethical Issues in CJ: Interface with Homeland Security and FEMA. 3 cr. The work in Criminal Justice Organizations (police, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice), Homeland Security, and FEMA are intricately related in the 21st Century, and somtimes involved the same organizations and personnel. Consequently, the challenges of legal and ethical issues are also similar. Using case analysis of actual and situational scenarios, this course explores a wide range of legal philosophies and ethical issues in decision making and agency operations. Included are: conflict in standards, decision making, and operational priorities during routine and crises situations; professionalism in recognizing and dealing with questionable behavior of individuals, and the consequences of failing to deal effectively with them. Recommended: CJ 201.

CJ 350 Criminal Procedure 3 cr. This course is designed to expose students to the rules and procedures in which criminal prosecutions are governed. The course begins with examining the rules and procedures of police investigations and continues throughout the process of the criminal justice process. Examples of questions that criminal procedures addresses are: When can a police officer conduct a search of a home? When can a probation officer enter probation's home without notice? Students will also examine the historical foundation of these rules and procedures. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201 and CJ 322.

CJ 362 Women in the Criminal Justice System 3 cr. (Diversity) Examines the nature and extent of female offenders, victims in the criminal justice system. The course will provide students with an understanding of the processing of women offenders through the criminal justice system. Students will also become familiar with the theoretical concepts focusing on female criminality and victimization. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201.

CJ 365 Law and Society 3 cr. Examination of the various perspectives on the development and implementation of law and assessment of the various facets of law in action. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201.

CJ 370 Court Processing and Sentencing 3 cr. Provides students with a comprehensive analysis of the U.S. court system; the functions of state and federal district, appellate, and supreme courts is reviewed; students are introduced to the influence of extra-legal factors and their differential impact on offender processing; contemporary criminal justice issues facing the court system are also examined. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201.

CJ 375 Gangs 3 cr. Explores gang phenomena in U.S.; concentrates on recent research about gang formation and gang related violence including the various criminological theories that explain the social, economic, political, and environmental reasons for the rise of gangs in various American urban centers. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201.

CJ 380 Corrections 3 cr. Examines institutionalization of convicted offenders; describes jails and prisons; investigates issues including privatization of prison operations, inmate labor, overcrowding, inmate gang formation and culture, and inmate rights; correctional officer duties/training/responsibilities are described; examines post-institutionalization experiences of released inmates in community programs; examines classification systems used to determine one's level of custody; describes different types of prisons/jails and their functions. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201.

CJ 385 Terrorism 3 cr. Explores terrorism from an international and national perspective; examines the social, political, and cultural reasons for terrorism including the law enforcement's fight against terrorism in the U.S. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201.

CJ 390 Criminal Justice in Indian Country 3 cr. Course examines historical and contemporary issues of crime, delinquency, justice, and public safety on American Indian Reservations and Alaskan Native Villages in the US. Specific focus will be given tribal justice systems; tribal interactions with Federal Justice Organizations (FBI, Federal Courts and Probation, Federal Bureau of Prisons), as well as tribal interface with local/county/state police, courts and corrections in 280 states such as ND. Tribal law and order reforms under PL 111-211 are examined along with reform policies for dealing with domestic violence, substance abuse, and gang violence. Recommended: CJ 201.

CJ 394 Independent Study 1-6 cr. Intensive study of substantive interest areas of students; major literature review leading to an analytical paper; topics chosen collaboratively by student and instructor/advisor. Grading Basis: S/U. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. Course may be repeated as topics change, but only 6 credits may be applied toward CJ requirements.

CJ 395 Victims and Victimology 3 cr. The course provides a student's overview of the characteristics and trends of victims in a variety of settings, and the criminal justice system's perception and response to these individuals. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201.

CJ 401 Administration of Criminal Justice Systems 3 cr. An overview of organizational theory as it applies to the administration of Criminal Justice agencies. In addition, this course places an emphasis on criminal justice management theory and policy development. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201.

CJ 420 Current Issues in Homeland Security 3 cr. This course builds on a student's knowledge about the American Criminal Justice System and its relation to Homeland Security. Course examines Homeland Security's history, legal foundation, national infrastructure and interface with criminal justice. Specific focus is given: intelligence and counterintelligence, weapons of mass destruction, cyber-crime, organized crime, domestic and border security, and immigration issues. Incident command and control systems, adopted in 2012 are discussed. Students completing the course satisfactorily may wish to obtain FEMA certificates. Prerequisite: CJ 201 or consent of Department.

CJ 450 White-Collar Crime 3 cr. Categories of job offending are analyzed through criminological theory, law, and the criminal and regulatory justice systems, including corporate crime, professional crime, individual crime, and crime by state workers. Traditional and novel strategies for the social control of these offenses are also presented. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201.

CJ 480 Criminal Justice Research and Data Analysis 3 cr. This course is designed for students interested in graduate studies in criminal justice. Specific emphasis is on applying scientific methodologies and analyses to current issues in criminal justice. Research designs, sampling procedures, data collection instruments, and ethical issues pertaining to special populations, (inmates, juvenile delinquents and minorities) will be the primary focus. Students will also learn data typically collected by CJ departments and agencies. Additionally, students will be provided with hands-on experience in developing a research proposal which incorporates methods and analyses for their criminological study. Co-requisites: CJ 201. Prerequisite(s): MATH 240

CJ 491 Senior Seminar 3 cr. Integration of program outcomes with application of knowledge, values, and skills necessary for field entry, value and ethical considerations, and the development and implementation of future career objectives. Provides application of core courses, provides students with current developments in key core areas. Prerequisite(s): criminal justice major, senior status and must have completed all CJ core courses.

CJ 497 Field Experience 3-6 cr. Student practicum in a criminal justice or related agency; course may be repeated in either the same or different agency; designed to enhance these experiences, supplementary readings and written assignments are required. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201 or consent of instructor; all core requirements must be completed before enrolling. Grading Basis: S/U. Repeatable for credit up to 6 cr.

CJ 499 Special Topics 1-8 cr. Specialized topics offered as regular classes; topics vary depending upon student and faculty interest. Prerequisite(s): CJ 201. Course may be repeated as topics change, but only 6 credits can be applied toward CJ requirements.

Driver Traffic Safety

DTS 225 Introduction to Safety Education 1 cr. Promotes general safety with special emphasis on school bus safety, fire safety and tornado safety.

DTS 230 Driver and Traffic Safety Education 3 cr. Introduction to driver and traffic safety education. A review of various high school textbooks and other teaching tools.

DTS 250 Defensive Driving 1 cr. Classroom course that is a part of the National Safety Council's Driver improvement program. Successful completion allows a three point reduction on a licensee's driving record.

DTS 260 Teenage Driving Behavior Problems 2 cr. Teaches prospective driver educators about the past problems concerning teenage traffic offenders. Assists driver educators in adjusting classroom presentations to address problems with beginning teenage drivers.

DTS 350 Advanced Driving 3 cr. Advanced driving to improve skills, perception, decision making, and general driving ability.

DTS 390 Traffic Law 3 cr. Study of the Code 39 of North Dakota Motor Vehicle laws. Designed to develop an understanding of traffic law in modern society.

DTS 450 Organization and Administration of Safety Education 2 cr. Basic concepts and development of the four phase program: dual controlled car, simulator, multiple car driving range, and classroom. Pre/Co-requisite(s): DTS 230.

DTS 452 Instruction in Range, Simulator and In-Car 3 cr. Instruction in the use of electronic driving simulator, equipment, multiple care driving range, and dual controlled car. Prerequisite(s): DTS 450.

DTS 454 Driver Education for the Disabled 2 cr. Instruction in dual-controlled cars with special hand controls for teaching the handicapped. Prerequisite(s): DTS 450.