Skip to content
Be seen. Be heard.

Center for the Applied Study of Cognition and Learning Sciences (CASCLS)

Reading List

Books/Articles:

  • Aamodt, S. and Sam Wang, S. (2008). Welcome to your brain: Why you lose your car keys but never forget how to drive and other puzzles of everyday life. - a fun but authoritative book that dispels many mind/brain myths. Sandra Aamodt, Ph.D., is the editor in chief of Nature Neuroscience, and Sam Wang, Ph.D., associate professor of neuroscience at Princeton.
     
  • Armstrong, T. (2000, 2nd Ed.). Multiple intelligences in the classroom. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD). — Armstrong provides many practical applications of the theory, with preface by Howard Gardner
     
  • Astington, J. (1993). The child’s discovery of mind.  Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.  — explores the concept of Theory of Mind, in which we come to understand others form thoughts in their minds that may be the same or different from our own
     
  • Battro, A. (2000). Half a brain is enough: The story of Nico. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
     
  • Bear, M., Connors, B., & Paradiso, M. A. (2006, 4th Ed.). Neuroscience: Exploring the brain. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins. — a comprehensive text written at a level for undergraduate students with available CD-ROM resources
     
  • Caine, R. N., & Caine G. (2011). Natural learning for a connected world: Education, technology and the human brain. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.
     
  • Carey, S. (2009). The origin of concepts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
     
  • Chen, J., Moran, S., and Gardner, H. (Eds.). (2009). Multiple Intelligences around the world. San Francisco, CA: Josey-Bass/Wiley. -a compilation of chapters on experiences and challenges with MI theory in over 16 nations
     
  • Costa, Arthur L. (ed.) (2001, third ed.). Developing minds: A resource book for teaching thinking. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD). — a compilation of articles and book chapters by leading writers on teaching for understanding and critical thinking
     
  • Csikzentmihalyi,.M. (1990). Flow: The psychology of optimal experience. New York, NY: Harper Perennial, HarperCollins. — an exploration of that ‘in the moment’ feeling when we are totally absorbed in a fluid performance
     
  • Csikzentmihalyi,.M. (1996). Creativity: Flow and the psychology of discovery and invention. New York, NY: Harper Collins.
     
  • Damon, W. (1988). The moral child: Nurturing children’s natural moral growth. New York, NY: The Free Press/MacMillian. — clearly written summary of cognitive science knowledge about children’s natural moral development, with approaches to moral education
     
  • Diamasio, A. (1999). Descartes' error: Emotion, reason, and the human brain. New York, NY: Harper perennial, HarperCollins. —neuroscientists Hanna and Antonio Damasio have studied numerous cases of brain injury and framed ideas about the interconnectedness of emotion and reasoning processes
     
  • Diamond, M., & J. Hopson (1998). Magic trees of the mind: How to nurture your child's intelligence, creativity, and healthy emotions. New York: Plume.
     
  • Doidge, N. (2007.) The brain that changes itself: stories of personal triumph from the frontiers of brain science. New York, NY: Viking.
     
  • Eliot, L. (2009). Pink brain blue brain: How small differences grow into troublesome gaps—and what we can do about it. New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.
     
  • Feifer, S. G., & De Fina, P.A. (2005). The neuropsychology of mathematics: Diagnosis and intervention. Middletown, MD: Neuropsyc Press, LLC.
     
  • Feurstein, Reuven; Fuerstein, Refael; & Falik, L.H. (2010). Beyond smarter: Mediated learning & the brain’s capacity for change. New York, NY: Teachers College Press. -Feurstein’s groundbreaking work on mediated learning, in accessible language, with multiple real examples
     
  • Feurstein, R. & Lewin-Benham, A. (2012). What learning looks like: Mediated learning in theory and practice, K-6. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.-to-date summary of Feurstein’s tools and methods for cognitive modifiability and mediated learning
     
  • Flynn, J. (2007). What is intelligence? Beyond the Flynn effect. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
     
  • Gardner, H. (2008). Five minds for the future. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Business School Press. — outlines the specific cognitive abilities that will be sought and cultivated by leaders in the years ahead
     
  • Gardner, H. (2006). The development and education of the mind: The selected works of Howard Gardner.  New York, NY: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group. — a collection of what Dr. Gardner considers his most important work, spanning 30 years, including reflections on the contributions of many great thinkers in the fields of cognitive psychology, neuroscience and developmental science
     
  • Gardner, H. (2006). Multiple Intelligences: New Horizons. New York, NY: Perseus Books.—an update of the several books on Gardner’s theory of multiple cognitive capabilities
     
  • Gardner, H. (1999). Intelligence reframed: multiple intelligences for the 21st century. New York, NY: Basic Books, Perseus Books Group. — Howard Gardner wrote this after reflecting upon the 10 years of effect his original Theory of Multiple Intelligences had on the fields of psychology and education
     
  • Gazzaniga, M.S., Ivry, T.B., & Magun, G.R. (2002). Cognitive neuroscience: The biology of the mind. New York, NY: W.W. Horton and Co. — a comprehensive text which provides an overview of pivotal research studies in psychology and neuroscience
     
  • Geake, J. (2009). The Brain at School: Educational Neuroscience in the Classroom. Open University Press/McGraw Hill.
     
  • Given, Barbara K. (2002).  Teaching to the brain's natural learning systems. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD).
     
  • Goleman, D. (1994). Emotional intelligence: Why it can matter more than IQ. New York, NY: Bantam Books. — a very readable synthesis of the work of many researchers on emotion and effective social interaction
     
  • Gopnik A., Meltzoff, AN, & Kuhl, P .K. (1999). The Scientist in the Crib. New York: William Morrow and Co. — explores the very earliest ways the mind/brain approaches the acquisition of information
     
  • Gordon, B. and Berger, L. (2003). Intelligent memory: Improve the memory that makes you smarter. Viking Press/Penguin Books.
     
  • Gordon, B. (1995). Memory: Remembering and forgetting in everyday life. Mastermedia Ltd./ Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives.
     
  • Hall, P.S. and Hall, N. (2003). Educating oppositional and defiant children. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD).
     
  • Harris, P. (1989). Children and emotion. Oxford, UK & Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers. — a collection of writings on how children develop emotional understanding
     
  • Immordino-Yang, M. H. (2007). A tale of two cases: Lessons for education from the study of two boys living with half their brains. Mind, Brain and Education. 1(2), 66-83. ---This is an article with updates on Nico --the young man Antonio Battro wrote about who had the right side of his brain removed; and Brook--who Dr. Immordino-Yang works with—who had the left side removed.
     
  • Karmiloff-Smith, A. (1992).  Beyond Modularity: A developmental perspective on cognitive science.  Cambridge, MA: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Press. — an examination of infants and children’s approaches to traditional content areas, how the brain becomes ‘modularized’ to process certain types of information in specialized areas, and how the mind/brain ‘redescribes’ its mental representations (physically and figuratively) as learning occurs
     
  • Klahr, D., and Carver, S. M. (2001). Cognition and instruction: Twenty-five years of progress.  Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.— includes key research study findings based on papers presented at the 30th Carnegie Mellon Symposium on Cognition, by content-area.
     
  • LeDoux, J. (1996). The emotional brain. New York, NY: Simon and Schuester.
     
  • LeDoux, J. (2002). The synaptic self: How our brains become who we are. New York, NY: Penguin Books.
     
  • Lewis, M. & Haviland-Jones, J.M. (2000. Eds.). Handbook of emotions. New York: Guilford Press. — a comprehensive compilation of first-source research studies in the field of emotion; Chapter 32 includes: Current directions in emotional intelligence research
     
  • Luria, A.R. (1968). The mind of a mnemonist: A little book about a vast memory. New York, NY: Basic Books. -Luria began his career as a student of Vygotsky. He went on to follow, across decades, the abilities of this individual with seemingly unlimited memory capacity.
     
  • National Research Council (NRC). (1999). How people learn: Brain, mind, experience, and school. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. — an excellent and very accessible overview of how the latest research in cognitive science can influence education, also available as an online book
     
  • Nelson, A., and Gilbert, S. (2005). Harvard Medical School guide to achieving optimal memory. President and Fellows of Harvard College: Harvard Medical Guides. New York, NY: McGraw Hill.
     
  • Parker, S. (2007). The human body: An illustrated guide to its structure, function and disorders. London: Dorling Kindersley Limited.  — a very accessible overview of human anatomy, with excellent full-color illustrations (all body systems, including the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nervous system, explanations of genetics and heritability, includes a DVD-Rom)
     
  • Patel, A.D. (2008). Music, language and the brain. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.   — a very readable yet extensive overview of similarities and differences in how the mind/brain approaches language and music, with nearly a 100 page bibliography
     
  • Peretz, I., Zatorre, R. (2009). The cognitive neuroscience of music. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
     
  • Perkins, David. (1995). Outsmarting IQ: The emerging science of learnable intelligence. New York, NY: The free press.
     
  • Perry, B., and Szalavitz, M. (2006). The boy who was raised as a dog: What traumatized children can teach us about loss, love, and healing. New York, NY: Basic Books.
     
  • Pianta, R. C. (1999). Enhancing relationships between children and teachers. Alexandria, VA. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD). — Robert Pianta examines the importance of positive interpersonal relationships in schools and how teachers can systematically improve relationships with students
     
  • Ratey, J. (2008). Spark: The revolutionary new science of exercise and the brain. New York, NY: Hachette Book Group. 
     
  • Ramachandran, V.S. (2004). A brief tour of human consciousness: From impostor poodles to purple numbers. New York: Pi Press.
     
  • Ridley, M. (1999). Genome: The autobiography of a species in 23 chapters.  New York, NY: Harper Collins.
     
  • Ridley, M. (2003). Nature via nurture: Genes, experience and what makes us human. New York, NY: Harper Collins. — for those interested in what the human genome project has to offer—a new slant on the ongoing discussion of heredity vs. learned ability and behavior
     
  • Rose, D. H., Strangman, N., and Rappolt, G. (2002). Teaching every student in the digital age: Universal design for learning. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD). — David Rose approaches instructional design as universally accommodating all learners, including those with special needs, especially through use of visual learning and contemporary technologies, also available as online book
     
  • Schaler, J. (Ed.). (2006) Howard Gardner under fire: The rebel psychologist faces his critics. Peru, IL: Open Court Press/Carus Publishing Company. — leading experts who disagree with Gardner on specific issues explain their reasons, and Gardner replies
     
  • Siegler, R. (1998, 3rd Ed.). Children’s thinking. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. — an overview of the child’s development of thought, including perception, information processing, conceptual understanding, development of thinking in content areas, etc. from Piaget’s theories to the present—includes end section with questions for the future
     
  • Shearer, B. (Ed.). (2009). MI at 25: Assessing the impact and future of multiple intelligences for teaching and learning. New York, NY: Teachers College Press. — Chapters representing a variety of perspectives, by Chomsky, Csikszentmihalyi, Darling-Hammond, Flynn, Greene, Hauser, Meier, Murray, Posner, Winner, and Gardner.
     
  • Spitzer, M. (1999). The mind within the net: Models of learning, thinking, and acting.  Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
     
  • Sylwester, R. (2005). How to explain a brain: An educator's handbook of brain terms and cognitive processes. Thousand Oaks, CA: Robert Sylwester/Corwin Press.
     
  • Tokuhama-Espinosa, T. (2010). The new science of teaching and learning: Using the best of mind, brain and education science in the classroom. New York, NY: Teachers College Press. -True, applicable neuroscience-with guidelines and real-life classroom illustrations.
     
  • Willingham, D. (2010). Why students don’t like school: A cognitive scientist answers questions about how the mind works and what it means for the classroom. New York, NY. John Wiley & Sons.
     
  • Wolfe, P. (2001). Brain matters: Translating research into classroom practice. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD).
     
  • Zull, J. E. (2002). The art of changing the brain. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing, LLC. — specifically tailored to higher ed., using faculty teaching examples