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Department of Biology

Courses

Biology

BIOL 111 Concepts of Biology 4 cr. (GE6) This course is designed to accommodate one semester of the General Education requirement for non-science majors at Minot State University. The course will focus on a comprehensive survey of modern biology with an emphasis on enhancing the science literacy of the college educated student. Topics will include, but not limited to: cell biology, genetics, evolution by natural selection, systematics, and the impact of human activity on the biosphere. Where appropriate, topics will be illustrated with examples of the human animal and at all times the course will reflect the five strands of a General Education course. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

BIOL 111H Honors Concepts of Biology 4 cr. (GE6) This course is designed to accommodate one semester of the General Education requirement for non-science majors of Minot State University. The course will focus on a comprehensive survey of modern biology with an emphasis on enhancing the science literacy of the college-educated student. Topics will include, but are not limited to: cell biology, genetics, evolution by natural selection, systematics, and the impact of human activity on the biosphere. Where appropriate, topics will be illustrated with examples of the human animal, and at all times the course will reflect the five strands of a General Education course. Laboratory time will focus on small-scale research projects and in-depth discussion. Honors Program admission is required.

BIOL 103 Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science 1 cr. Designed to acquaint first-year student (freshman) medical technology students with the depth and breadth of this field. Students visit medical technology departments at local hospitals. The course is presented by the education coordinators at local hospitals. Lecture, 1 hour.

BIOL 115 Human Structure and Function 4 cr. Structure and function of the human body. Anatomy and physiology of major body systems is emphasized. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

BIOL 127 Environmental Biology 4 cr. (GE6) Designed to acquaint students with major principles of ecology and the nature of human interaction with the living world. The course will focus on how human action influences the ecology of the earth. Ecological concepts covered will include community structure, predator prey interactions, competition, tropic levels, energy flow, the carbon cycle, and adaptation. In this light, students will examine specific issues and problems including those of land use choices, natural resource exploitation, biodiversity, industrialization, and urbanization.

BIOL 142 General Microbiology 4 cr. (GE6) A survey of microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, microbial interaction with humans, and the impact of microorganisms on the environment. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

BIOL 150 General Biology I: Introduction to Cellular Biology 4 cr. (GE6) Introduction to fundamental concepts of biology at the level of the cell including: bioenergetics, cell structure, physiology principles, genetic function and inheritance. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

BIOL 150H Honors General Biology I 4 cr. (GE6) Introduction to fundamental concepts of biology at the level of the cell including: bioenergetics, cell structure, physiology principles, genetic function and inheritance. Laboratory time will focus on small-scale research projects and in-depth discussion. Honors Program admission is required.

BIOL 151 General Biology II: Introduction to Zoology 4 cr. (GE6) The biology of animals is covered beginning with an emphasis on the underlying cellular structure and physiology and expanding towards larger whole organism features that are difficult to predict from cell biology. The general patterns of animal life are covered. In an effort to connect the general principles offered in this course to one's daily life (e.g., cellular respiration, excretion, muscle structure and function), an emphasis is placed on mammalian systems. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 115 or CHEM 121.

BIOL 151H Honors General Biology II 4 cr. (GE6) The biology of animals is covered beginning with an emphasis on the underlying cellular structure and physiology and expanding towards larger whole organism features that are difficult to predict from cell biology. The general patterns of animal life are covered. In an effort to connect the general principles offered in this course to one's daily life (e.g., cellular respiration, excretion, muscle structure and function), an emphasis is placed on mammalian systems. Laboratory time will focus on small-scale research projects and in-depth discussion. Honors Program admission is required.

BIOL 154 Introduction to Botany 4 cr. (GE6) Introduction to the biology of plants emphasizing evolution and diversity, plant anatomy and development, water and mineral nutrition, photosynthesis, and plant ecology. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

BIOL 154H Honors Introduction to Botany 4 cr. (GE6) Introduction to the biology of plants emphasizing evolution and diversity, plant anatomy and development, water and mineral nutrition, photosynthesis, and plan ecology. Laboratory time will focus on small-scale research projects and in-depth discussion. Honors Program admission is required.

BIOL 215 Genetics 4 cr. Introduction to principles of genetics including: inheritance, DNA and chromosomes, gene regulation, evolution, and genetic engineering. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 150

BIOL 220 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 cr. Structure and function of the human body dealing with the chemical, cellular, and tissue levels of organization and integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

BIOL 221 Anatomy and Physiology II 4 cr. Structure and function of the human body dealing with the digestive, cardiovascular, respiratory, lymphatic, endocrine, reproductive, and urinary systems; special senses and metabolism, fluid and electrolyte, and acid-base balance; metabolism and energetics. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 220.

BIOL 240 Biometrics 4 cr. The course will cover introductory statistic concepts in a form designed specifically for biology majors. It is a practical, sofware-based examination of concepts of sampling, hypotheses testing (non-parametric and parametric), descriptive statistics, contigency, correlation, analysis or variation, linear models, and basi multivariate techniques. Only biological, real-world data will be used. The course will concentrate on underlying princples, applicability and pratcial use of methods covered. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hour. Prerequisites: Math 103 or higher and at least two from BIOL 150, 151, and 154.

BIOL 250 Cellular Biology 4 cr. An advanced cell biology designed for biology majors with an emphasis on biological chemistry, membrane structure and transport, cellular energy metabolism, protein synthesis and modification, subcellular organelle structure and function, and the cell biology of the nucleus. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 150.

BIOL 301 Evolution 4 cr. This course details the processes that influence evolutionary change. An emphasis is placed on the methodology for (1) inferring phylogenetic relationships (i.e., history), (2) determining the relative influences of natural selection and genetic drift, and (3) exploring the conditions that lead to various modes of speciation. Topics covered include population genetics, speciation, microevolution vs. macroevolution, punctuated equilibrium, life history theory, and modes of selection. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, 151, 154, 215.

BIOL 310 Ethnobotany 4 cr. (Diversity)This course will focus on the diversity of plant uses, covering approaches of diverse lectures includeing introduction to medicinal plant uses specific to North Dakota and Native American plant use. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours.

BIOL 325 Entomology 4 cr. Classification, taxonomy, morphology, identification, life histories, interrelationships, and economic importance of insects. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 151.

BIOL 330 Biogeography 4 cr. This course will describe the spatial patterns in the distribution of species and will examine how abiotic and biotic factors are hypothesized to result in these patterns. Lecture, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour. Prerequisites: BIOL 151.

BIOL 335 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 4 cr. A study of the structure of vertebrates, with a focus on revealing the evolutionary relationships of major vertebrate groups. The laboratories will involve detailed examiniation and dissection of a broad range of vertebrate animals, including lampreys, sharks, amphibians, reptiles, and cats. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 151.

BIOL 340 Systematic Zoology 4 cr. Evolution, classification, taxonomy, and identification of invertebrates and vertebrates. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 151.

BIOL 346 Developmental Biology 4 cr. This course covers the morphological changes occurring during the development of select animals, as well as the current understanding of underlying molecular mechanisms that regulate development and produce those morphological changes. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 215.

BIOL 347 General Ecology 4 cr. Plants and animals in their environment. An ecosystem approach is used. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, 151, 154.

BIOL 349 Plant Physiology 4 cr. Physiological processes of plants with special emphasis on nutrition, metabolism, growth and development. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 150.

BIOL 350 Freshwater Biology 4 cr. Biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of inland waters including origins, interrelationships and the effect of civilization. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 142 or 150 or 151 or 154.

BIOL 360 Morphology of Vascular Plants 4 cr. Structure and development of vascular plants with special emphasis on evolutionary trends. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 150.

BIOL 401 Population Genetics 4 cr. This course explores the mechanics of evolution from the viewpoint of allelic frequencies. It begins with the basic theory of Hardy Weinberg equilibrium and expands that theory to embrace linkage disequilibrium, selection in single-locus and multifocus systems, genetic drift, and the effects of mutation rates, population size, and migration on the genetic structure of populations. Exposure is given to classic ideas (e.g., shifting balance theory and runaway sexual selection) and to applications of theory (e.g., breeding designs, conservation genetics). Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory 3 hr. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 215.

BIOL 402 Bioinformatics 4 cr. Computational methods for study of biological sequence data in comparative biology and evolution. Analysis of genome content and organization. Techniques for searching sequence databases, pairwise and multiple sequence alignment, phylogenetic methods, and methods for pattern recognition and functional inference from sequence data. Pre-Requisite(s): BIOL 150 and MATH 103

BIOL 405 Prokaryotic Physiology 4 cr. In depth examination of the physiology, metabolism, and genetics of bacteria and archaea. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 151, BIOL 154, BIOL 215 and BIOL 250.

BIOL 420 Co-op Practicum 4-8 cr. A cooperative program with industry, state, and federal agencies for an in-depth study of a specialized aspect of biology. Students spend approximately 25 clock hours per semester hour for the practicum. Prerequisite: 2 years of biology or consent of biology coordinator. Repeatable for credit.

BIOL 430 Pre-Veterinary Practicum 3 cr. This program is designed to give MSU students a hands-on experience in veterinary medicine. The students spend about 80 hours per semester for the practicum. Prerequisite: 2 years of biology.

BIOL 440 Pre-Med Practicum 3 cr. This program is designed to give MSU students a basic understanding of the hospital and its functions. Students spend approximately 90 hours per semester in the various departments and the family practice clinic. Students are supervised by the physicians involved in the program while the program is coordinated by a biology professor on campus. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

BIOL 445 Cancer Biology 4 cr. This course describes the major aspects of cell cycle control and relates them to the multiple cell cycle defects associated with cancer. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 215.

BIOL 448 Systematic Botany 4 cr. Classification and taxonomy of seed plants with emphasis on local flora. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 154.

BIOL 450 Parasitology 4 cr. Morphology, taxonomy, and life histories of the endemic, exotic, and zoonotic parasites of the animal kingdom. Diseases caused by parasites are also presented. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, MLS majors only.

BIOL 455 Hematology 4 cr. Study of the blood and hematologic disorders including anemia, leukemia, and other blood dyscrasias. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 150, MLS majors only.

BIOL 458 Anatomy of Seed Plants 4 cr. Development of cells, tissues, and organs in seed plants. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 150.

BIOL 460 Herpetology 4 cr. Herpetology is the study of reptiles (exclusive of birds) and amphibians; this includes extant groups (e.g., frogs) and extinct groups (e.g., dinosaurs). This course begins with the phylogeny, history, and taxonomy of "herps" (i.e., reptiles and amphibians) and progresses to coverage of physiology, ecology, and behavior. Prerequisite: BIOL 151.

BIOL 465 Immunology 4 cr. Principles of the mammalian immune response. Detalis of cells and mechanisms used to comb at pathogens. Some exposure to immune system disorders. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 150.

BIOL 470 Histology 4 cr. The course presents the microscopic anatomy of vertebrates with an emphasis on humans.Structure-function relationships at the cell and tissue levels are highlighted. Cell and tissue anatomy comprise the structural basis of normal physiology. Knowledge of histology is essential for understanding disease mechanisms in terms of altered structure and function of the body. Students are expected to identify cells, tissues and organs, and understand the structural basis of their function. Emphasis is placed on microscopic study in laboratories. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 150 or 220.

BIOL 475 Medical Microbiology 4 cr. Isolation, identification and clinical application of pathogenic microorganisms. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 142.

BIOL 480 Molecular Biology 4 cr. This course covers a variety of topics concerning the macromolecules of living cells, focusing on nucleic acids and proteins. Major areas of study include: DNA replication and transcription, protein synthesis (translation), and comparison of processes in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The latter part of the course will focus on mechanisms of gene expression, the molecular genetics of cancer, and applied molecular biology. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 215.

BIOL 492 Directed Research 1-5 cr. The faculty of the Department of Biology considers research a valuable component of the curriculum. The content and extent of research projects are determined by the student and a faculty sponsor. The research may be in the lab or field and is intended to help the student develop a greater appreciation of the scientific process. While publication is not a requirement, all projects have a goal of producing publishable results. A successful experience in research can be an asset for graduate studies and many careers in biology. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 150, 151, 154. Repeatable for credit.